Author Topic: More pickle magic  (Read 368 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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More pickle magic
« on: January 18, 2019, 07:37:01 AM »
 In my thread on Deli Styled pickles I mentioned that I was experimenting with making Bread & Butter pickles and also sweet pickled Vegetable Salad, for the salad I used sliced pickling cucumbers, thin sliced carrots, celery, strips if red and green bell pepper, thinly sliced yellow onion, green string beans, and bite sized pieces of cauliflower.
 I made a batch of each a couple of days ago and they turned out fantastic, the taste is great striking a perfect balance of sweet & sour, for the Bread & Butter pickles I used a combination of English Cucumber and medium sized pickling cucumbers, I also added some thin sliced onion and some red bell pepper sliced in thin strips, there wasn't much difference between the two types of cucumbers in the finished product.
 For me the magic about these pickles is that they are easy to prepare and are ready to eat in anywhere from a couple of hours to a couple of days, the dill Deli Styled will keep in the fridge for several weeks and the Bread & Butter pickles and salad will keep for over a month in the fridge, and they don't require a lot of work, no pressure cooker or water bath methods or clean up to worry about.
 If anyone is interested in the recipes for either or both I'll be happy to post them here,  there didn't seem to be much interest in the Deli Styled pickles.
 Winter is a great time for these kind of projects especially if you like to cook and experiment with different types of foods. 

 I've been reading about the process of fermentation pickling and preservation using salt and filtered water as the base pickling agents (no vinegar or other acidic ingredients), the benefit of the fermentation process is that it preserves foods as well and as long (from what I read) as the more labor intensive canning methods do but doesn't destroy some of the nutrients or probiotic qualities of the foods being processed.
 There is some small amount of attention that must be given to the foods being preserved by fermentation in the first week or two depending on the foods, the fermentation process give off gas which builds pressure in the containers that have to be released at least once a day until the initial process is complete, this is referred to as burping, but there are burping valves on the market for that specific part of the process.
 Once the food has gone through the initial fermentation process you just screw the lids on hand tight and store in the fridge, if long term storage is your goal you can use the same process but put the appropriate jars with the food included through a simple water bath process at the end of the fermentation period and store them on a shelf or in your pantry for up to a year or more.
   
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Offline wolfy

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Re: More pickle magic
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2019, 10:19:58 AM »
My brother made several 5 qt. ice cream bucketfuls of those refrigerator bread & butter pickles every year.  When things like zucchinis and cucumbers start producing overwhelming numbers of fruits, pickles are about your only hope of keeping ahead of them.  We just leave them in the buckets in the fridge and they keep for months without canning. :shrug:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: More pickle magic
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2019, 10:09:57 PM »
My brother made several 5 qt. ice cream bucketfuls of those refrigerator bread & butter pickles every year.  When things like zucchinis and cucumbers start producing overwhelming numbers of fruits, pickles are about your only hope of keeping ahead of them.  We just leave them in the buckets in the fridge and they keep for months without canning. :shrug:

 I've never made this stuff before I ran across a recipe that got me started,  I've always been interested in food preservation, I remember when I was a kid, we lived in my grand parents three family house, we on the first floor, my grand parents on the second, and my aunt & uncle on the third floor.
 They had all experienced the great depression and the rationing of WW-2,  so they raised chickens, a lot of chickens, the folks bartered what we didn't use, for milk from the milkman, bread and pastry from the baker, Ice from the ice house, and beef and pork from the butcher shop.
 We also had a big victory garden (about a third of an acre,  there was a root cellar in the basement along with shelves for storing canned goods, starting around August until October the family was harvesting a canning as the produce was ready, my mom and dad and my uncle and aunt did most of the work of picking, cleaning, and canning, my grand parents were up into their 60's (people aged younger back then), they helped where they could, but the bulk of the work was left to the younger folks although it was my dad and grand dad that did the butchering and made the sausage.
 To the point, I was always interested in it but it was harder work than I cared to get into,  I've always had the urge to make jellies, jams, and pickles but never pursued it,  all that prep, pressure cookers, sterilizing jars and lids and all the assorted canning tools seemed like more work than fun.
 With the discovery of these quick and easy recipes without the need for pressure cookers and the assorted tools and hours of work,  it's made it possible for me to jump into it without having to fall too far.
 I used to have a garden every year, but my arthritis makes kneeling and bending to tend the garden too difficult even with raised beds,  but thankfully we still live in a semi rural area and there are plenty of great farmers markets going continuously from about June to October, the produce is always nice and the prices always reasonable. 

 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.