Author Topic: Madison Grant  (Read 177 times)

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Offline randyt

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Madison Grant
« on: May 11, 2020, 05:17:04 AM »
I recently picked up a couple books by Madison Grant. The Kentucky Rifle Hunting Pouch and Knives in Homespun America. Been wanting to read these books. The funny thing about it is, the books cost more used than new from Track Of the Wolf.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2020, 11:03:43 AM »
I have seen the book on the pouch's but not the book on the knives.  Good stuff I suspect.  Amazon gets $60.00 for the pouch book.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2020, 11:04:58 AM »
I recently picked up a couple books by Madison Grant. The Kentucky Rifle Hunting Pouch and Knives in Homespun America. Been wanting to read these books. The funny thing about it is, the books cost more used than new from Track Of the Wolf.

If you're in to 18th and 19th century primitive living history you are going to enjoy those books,  and if you are into making hunting bags, powder horns, and other accoutrements of the trapper/hunter of the day that revolves around muzzle loading arms you'll find them to be excellent reference guides, Madison Grant is the premier authority on anything related to those topics.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2020, 11:07:16 AM »
I have seen the book on the pouch's but not the book on the knives.  Good stuff I suspect.  Amazon gets $60.00 for the pouch book.

He wrote about bags and pouches, powder horns, and knives of the era.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline randyt

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2020, 03:40:20 PM »
I think the books are 30 something from track of the wolf. I've been enjoying them.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2020, 04:32:09 PM »
I bought both of those books around 40 years ago.....indispensab le information for anyone into muzzleloaders or living history.  The Kentucky Rifle Rifle Hunting Pouch seems to be the 'go-to' source for anyone wanting to put together a bag/horn combo that is not big & heavy, but light & handy for tending a longrifle.....where most people screw up. :P
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2020, 07:51:49 AM »
I bought both of those books around 40 years ago.....indispensab le information for anyone into muzzleloaders or living history.  The Kentucky Rifle Rifle Hunting Pouch seems to be the 'go-to' source for anyone wanting to put together a bag/horn combo that is not big & heavy, but light & handy for tending a longrifle.....where most people screw up. :P

 Right you are Craig,  that's what happens much of the time when writers assume the mantle of expert and write about things that they actually know nothing about.
 Back in the day when Fess Parker was dressing in buck skins and toting a long rifle or musket being Boone or Crocket,  modern BP enthusiast were creating a market for muzzle loaders and all things of that period, some know it all spread the idea that all long hunters, mountain men, and adventurers of the time carried all of their "possibles" in a rather large shoulder bag along with their powder horns,  so manufacturers started making possibles bags about the size of a woman's purse, and it stuck.
 Meanwhile industrious folks who grew up in the valley's and holler's like Madison Grant and others were making authentic period correct shooting pouches and hunting bags along with powder horns and the arms that they accompanied,  but like they say, when legend becomes more popular than truth, print the legend. 
 In truth most people in the colonies that hunted were town folks, farmers, and store keepers and their hunts weren't much different than those of modern hunters today, most were for small game and most were day hunts lasting from an hour or two to a full day when they had the time off,  they usually didn't carry everything needed to maintain their rifles or smoothbore hunting guns,  they carried a small pouch containing a few balls and patch material, a oily rag, an extra flint or percussion caps, a touch hole or nipple pick, and maybe a folding knife or patch knife.
 Their horns were usually small as well, surely not made to hold much more powder than they needed for a days worth of hunting, probably no more than 6~7 inches long, a successful hunter might bag a few pounds of game on an average hunt, he wouldn't want to have to carry around his catch in addition to a possibles bag and large horn that together might weigh several pounds in and of themselves.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Madison Grant
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2020, 10:22:50 AM »
I am sure some of you know about the site: https://contemporarymakers.blogspot.com/  I features both antique and contemporary items. They show rifles, knives, sheaths, bags, and accoutrements from many of the best makers and original items from the colonial period.  It is a part of the contemporary long rifle group. 
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)