Author Topic: Enzo Trapper 95 bushcraft knife  (Read 187 times)

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Offline wsdstan

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Enzo Trapper 95 bushcraft knife
« on: October 17, 2020, 12:51:21 PM »
Sorting through my knives today looking for something I couldn't find where it should be I saw a Enzo Trapper 95 that I picked up second hand but have never used.  I sharpened it some when I got it although it was plenty sharp when it got here.

The knife is M2 steel and curly birch on the handle.  It is 8 1/4" overall length and has a 3 3/4" blade.  Scandi grind. 

This is the knife (top one) besides a Bernie Garland recurve bushcrafter to give you a size comparison.



The other side



In the hand



The blade



This is a pretty reasonably priced bushcraft knife when new coming in around $175 with curly birch or $140 with a synthetic material handle.  It isn't in the same class of fit and finish as one of Mike McCarter's  (Sarge on the forum) or Crash's knives but if you are looking for a bushcrafter you can beat up without feeling bad this one would do just fine.

M2 steel is a molybdenum tool steel and can reach RC hardness well over 62 to 64 but for a knife somewhere around 58-59 would be better I think.  With the scandi grind this knife is easy to sharpen and even I got an edge that is scary sharp. 



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Offline wolfy

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Re: Enzo Trapper 95 bushcraft knife
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2020, 01:24:49 PM »
I remember those things being touted as one of the more popular knife-brands/designs for our our needs in this game.  As I recall, you can order a 'blank' and put on your own handle-scale-material of choice.  It would be an option if you wanted to save a couple of frog skins. :popcorn:
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Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Enzo Trapper 95 bushcraft knife
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2020, 05:28:48 PM »
Yes you can although a lot of sellers are posting "out of stock" on them.  The would save you a lot of frogskins.  Used to be $50 for the 01 steel blank (although the msrp was $80)


« Last Edit: October 17, 2020, 05:50:38 PM by wsdstan »
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Enzo Trapper 95 bushcraft knife
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2020, 05:58:05 PM »
Yes you can although a lot of sellers are posting "out of stock" on them.  The would save you a lot of frogskins.  Used to be $50 for the 01 steel blank (although the msrp was $80)

 I've had one in 01 for a lot of years and it's been a really good knife,  mine has Ivory Micarta scales with thin blue liners,  it's also in Scandi grind, though more of a Scandvex now after a couple of sandpaper sharpenings and a few stropings,  the blade is hard enough that it hasn't lost any noticeable edge material.
 The Enzo Trapper in my opinion is a very under rated general purpose knife,  it'll carve a try stick with the best of them,  it'll process fire wood,  do kitchen duty,  and makes a fine hunting knife,  I'd say that it's in the same class as the falkniven F-1,  though not made of laminated super steel it takes and holds a scary sharp edge,  most that I seen on the used market are averaging about $110.00 and can be purchased new for about $130.00 if you look hard enough. 
 For me,  it's a knife that's not worth selling,  it's just that good.   
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Enzo Trapper 95 bushcraft knife
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2020, 06:51:30 PM »
I love those! A little something for everybody... Scandi grind, convex, carbon steel, stainless...
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)