Author Topic: Trail foods and camp cooking  (Read 65594 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #150 on: May 04, 2014, 03:51:44 PM »
 
  My recipe..........

                              1-1/2 cups of Stone ground yellow cornmeal.
                              1-1/2 cups of All Purpose unbleached white flour.
                              1- tsp. course salt.
                              3- tsp. of double acting baking powder.
                              1/2 - of sugar.
                              1/4 -cup of melted butter.
                              1-1/4 cups of milk.
                              1- large egg (beaten)

    *preheat oven to 425*F.  (put cast iron skillet in the oven when the oven is cold and let it come to temp.)

                               Mix all the ingredients in a bowl  (don't over beat the batter,  some lumps are OK ).
         
    * when the oven beeps take out the skillet and butter it well,  pour the batter in and put it back in the oven.

                               Bake for 20 ~ 25 minutes and check with toothpick,  if it comes out clean it's done.

   My wife loves it warm out of the oven for breakfast topped with apple sauce or strawberry jam.

    * If you have leftover cornbread after a couple of days,  beat a few eggs,  add a teaspoon of vanilla extract, 1/4 cup of sugar,  and 1-1/2 cups of milk,  beat and pour over crumbed cornbread,  bake in a water bath at 350*F.  for 30 minutes (until it's loosely set up),  take it out, let it cool,  makes a great cornbread pudding. 
                               
« Last Edit: May 05, 2014, 04:20:44 AM by Moe M. »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #151 on: May 04, 2014, 04:24:10 PM »
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why do most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #152 on: May 04, 2014, 04:26:48 PM »
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #153 on: May 04, 2014, 04:29:07 PM »
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[

Huh?  1/3 of a tablespoon is 1 teaspoon. 3 tsp = 1 Tbs. And measuring once is more accurate that measuring 3 times for the same volume.
You lost me, Wolfy.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #154 on: May 04, 2014, 04:35:18 PM »
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[

Huh?  1/3 of a tablespoon is 1 teaspoon. 3 tsp = 1 Tbs. And measuring once is more accurate that measuring 3 times for the same volume.
You lost me, Wolfy.
If you didn't like that one, how 'bout this.........In the their zeal to eliminate extra weight in their backpacks, ultralight backpacking zealots carry only the smallest spoon in the set that is practical to eat with and still cover all the bases. :shrug:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #155 on: May 05, 2014, 04:58:32 AM »
Here's a rhetorical question, but I see it all the time. In fact, i have a recipe card in my hand right now that says "3 tsp of .....".  Three teaspoons equals 1 Tablespoon. So why to most recipes call for 3 tsp instead of 1 Tbs???? 
:shrug:
Because adding 3 teaspoons is more accurate than estimating a 3rd of a tablespoon. :[

Huh?  1/3 of a tablespoon is 1 teaspoon. 3 tsp = 1 Tbs. And measuring once is more accurate that measuring 3 times for the same volume.
You lost me, Wolfy.

  Jeeze guys,   it's six of one, or half a dozen of the other,  or,  3 of one and 1/4 0f the other,  it's three little teaspoons,   get to that measure any way it pleases you,   hell,  who even checks to make sure their measures are accurate in the first place.
  It would be interesting to see just how many people don't even own a set of measuring spoons,  one couple we know uses a tea spoon,  a soup spoon,  and a coffee cup as measures,  they just guesstimate for in between measures,  which is probably why their coffee sucks.        :lol:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #156 on: May 05, 2014, 07:46:08 AM »
...
  Jeeze guys,   it's six of one, or half a dozen of the other,  or,  3 of one and 1/4 0f the other,  it's three little teaspoons,   get to that measure any way it pleases you,  ...
That's why I said it was a rhetorical question. Who cares? But it's just one of the little things I always notice. Like a recipe that calls for "4 Tbs" instead of 1/4 cu.  Or people who always say "have to" instead of "need to".  :lol:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #157 on: May 05, 2014, 01:21:37 PM »
...
  Jeeze guys,   it's six of one, or half a dozen of the other,  or,  3 of one and 1/4 0f the other,  it's three little teaspoons,   get to that measure any way it pleases you,  ...
That's why I said it was a rhetorical question. Who cares? But it's just one of the little things I always notice. Like a recipe that calls for "4 Tbs" instead of 1/4 cu.  Or people who always say "have to" instead of "need to".  :lol:

  I know what you're saying and I agree,  it would be a much more simple world, especially for old guys like us if the academics didn't feel a need to complicate everything they get close to,  for some reason they thing that every problem can be solved by turning it into a Math equation.
  Combine that thinking with "new speak" (the art of talking faster than the human ear and mind can understand), and you find yourself in a constant state of saying "What",   what really makes me pause is when I read a recipe then go to the directions and find that one or more ingredients have either been added or omitted either in the list of ingredients or in the directions.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #158 on: May 05, 2014, 01:43:18 PM »
...
  Combine that thinking with "new speak" (the art of talking faster than the human ear and mind can understand), and you find yourself in a constant state of saying "What",   what really makes me pause is when I read a recipe then go to the directions and find that one or more ingredients have either been added or omitted either in the list of ingredients or in the directions.
That is especially evident in broadcasting, where the narrator has to get 5 minutes worth of disclaimers jammed into a 15 second commercial.  :P

Ah, yes...the 'mystery ingredient'.  I know it well. What really drives me nuts is the person writing the directions who is semi-literate and can't organize their thoughts, and the editor who doesn't see anything wrong with it.
For people who are used to cooking, and know how stuff is supposed to go together, it's not so bad. But for new cooks who rely upon recipes, it can spell disaster when they get all the ingredients in the bowl, and then find out at the bottom of the directions that there were supposed to combine the liquids and dry ingredients in separate bowls before mixing them. Arrrggghhh!
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline diogenes

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #159 on: July 12, 2014, 05:08:08 PM »
I've been making this as a quick snack for years and after having some just now I realized that it'd make for pretty good trail fare.

Garbanzo Beans & Tuna Salad

This is a very simple Italian dish (ceci con il tonno) that can be altered/ added to very easily. The basic recipe is this:

1 can garbanzo beans, drained
1 can tuna, drained
salad dressing (I make my own, but store bought Italian dressing should be fine)
salt & pepper

Just toss the ingredients together and it's ready to eat. Usually with some bread or crackers. For trail eats I'd keep it pretty basic but when I make it at home I usually throw some minced garlic & chili flakes in it and maybe some fresh parsley and chopped scallions. I just had it with pine nuts in it too. Delicious.  8)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2014, 10:22:00 PM by diogenes »
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Offline TN Griller

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #160 on: July 30, 2014, 06:08:44 AM »
diogenes, your garbanzo beans and tuna salad is indeed good eating. I like mine with lemon pepper seasoning.

Offline diogenes

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #161 on: July 30, 2014, 07:25:02 AM »
diogenes, your garbanzo beans and tuna salad is indeed good eating. I like mine with lemon pepper seasoning.

Thanks! That sounds great.   :)
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Offline Orbean

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #162 on: February 21, 2015, 07:19:51 PM »
I have my staples ; white chocolate peanut butter, dried cherries with peanut m&ms, emergen-c pack, and an assortment of granola/fruit/energy bars. I am a huge fan of an instant full cream milk powder called NIDO it is a nestle product. I purchase it from a middle eastern grocery store. It tastes so much better than the low fat instant milk. I drink lot of hot herb tea when camping in the colder weather.
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Offline Moe M.

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My new Bannock recipe
« Reply #163 on: July 02, 2016, 08:26:17 AM »

 I often make bannock while in camp instead of packing bread that has a tendency of getting mould pretty quickly in humid weather,  the problem I have with bannock is that most recipes call for simple ingredients like flour, baking powder, a pinch of salt, and water,  and what you get if you don't burn it is a facsimile of pretty bland primitive bread.
 Yes, I know that it's a primitive food,  but my tastes seem to have gotten allot more sophisticated over time from that of my early ancestors,  so I decided to go on a quest to find a more palate pleasing "Bannock" recipe.
 What I found was several ideas that got me experimenting with different ingredients and this is what I came up with that is easy to make ahead of time and keeps well in storage and transit.

 Bannock Mix (I tried to break it down into parts to make it easier than measurement).

   You can use any unit of measure you please,  mine is based on 1/4 cup per part.

   2 parts Quaker inst. oatmeal.
   2 parts Bisquick baking mix or equivalent.
   1 part brown sugar.
   1/2- tsp. salt.
   2 tsp. baking powder.
   1/4- tsp. of crushed black pepper.
   1/4- tsp. of dried thyme.
   Water enough to make a loose dough.

    I ran the oatmeal through my small food processor,  you could also use a coffee grinder,  just to break it down to a smaller texture,  it doesn't have to be powder.

    * Mix all the dry ingredients in a zip lock bag and store,  when ready to bake your Bannock take out what you need and mix it with just enough water to make a loose dough,  and bake it like you normally would,  at home I bake it in my oven at 400*f. for 20 minutes.
  In camp I usually wrap it on a debarked stick or make a thin loaf on a small plank cut from pine or cedar and placed by the fire to slow bake.

   When it's done it tastes kind of like a fluffy oatmeal cookie.    :banana:

   PS,  if you happen to have any bacon fat left from frying your bacon, a couple of Table spoons full mixed into the dough adds another layer of flavor.

  Enjoy
 
 
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Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #164 on: July 02, 2016, 09:47:40 AM »
Not peeled potatoes baked in hot ash. I'm used to pull them out before they are cooked, make a hole in each and fill it with raw egg. Then I put them for a moment back into hot ash. Seasoned just with salt and pepper. It's tasty and filling meal. Remains of mass, hollowed out from potatoes can be used into stew or soup.


We did this OFTEN when I was in college.  Just toss the spuds into the hot ashes, open a can of beans and put the can in the ashes, too.  When all is done, cut the spud in half, top with beans.  Chile works well for this too.
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Offline mmch244

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Re: Trail foods and camp cooking
« Reply #165 on: August 18, 2018, 11:28:45 AM »
In response to original post and a few since then: My kids and I make our own packable meals instead of buying the freezedried meals which cost more (yes, the freezedried meals weigh less but to me are often tasteless). I found corn on the cob that's shelf stable at our local Walmart ($1.38 and you get 2 ears, PKG says" So Natural minute corn on the cob, boils 2-4 mins in a Jet Boil/Camp Chef Stryker backpacking stove. We pack Applesauce pouches, Jiff to go singles, crackers, planter peanut single serve pouches, pasta sides Alfredo (calls for milk, we buy the shelf stable milk at Dollar tree, it's shelf stable until opened but kids drink it up whatever we don't use for cooking), I add 1 pouch of Tyson's grilled and ready premium white chicken pouches to the Alfredo noodles,
I add a couple pouches of hot cocoa and instant cider pouches, for me I gotta have my coffee ( I have the jet boil and I carry a GSI 20oz coffee press because coffee is that important to me and I don't have to dump/wash my coffee out to be able to cook something else. I carry coffee mate 2go creamer ( no refrigeration required and liquid stevia (to me it tastes better than the packets but I'm sure packets are lighter for weight),  I add a couple of hard candy suckers (cheap at Dollar tree) in each Ziploc bag (meal kits), I also add a couple of pouches of Oatmeal (we like the Strawberries and cream), I also found Barilla makes fully cooked Rotini noodles in a pouch (says ready in 60 sec in a microwave or 2-4 min on stove top at a boil, jet boil in about 2 min). I add mini box of raisins (from dollar tree), I get Goya chicken bouillon powder packets and Mac and cheese powder packets (I save my Mac and cheese powder packets when cooking at home as at home I use real cheese so I save the pouches for backpacking), I add a pouch of tuna to go with the Barilla pasta, I also add a pouch of Idahoan mashed potatoes, I also add a couple protein bars from Aldi's and flavor water drink pouches (from dollar tree, country time lemonade, Hawaiian Punch multiple flavors plus all are sugar free, I usually add jerky for our hikes and trips (single serve jack links as they are sealed and no refrigeration required). Just an FYI for those who might be weighing pros and cons or comparing Jet Boil Flash (I have this) to the Camp chef Stryker (my kids have these)here's what we found: the Stryker has a larger pot but isn't tall enough to fit 100G isobutane fuel canister inside of the pot and be able to lock the toggle down on the lid to secure for travel while the Jet Boil Flash is easily accommodating for the 100G Jet Boil brand fuel canister but not the Coleman brand isobutane fuel canister. Jet boil flash offers a coffee press attachment(purchased separately at scout shop $10)for those who are kinda like me and require coffee whereas Camp chef Stryker does not, so a separate coffee press would be required or use instant coffee or a pour over set up (to me it's worth carrying the extra weight for my GSI 20oz coffee press). Both boil in about the same time frame of 2 min (boiling water). Jet boil Flash also offers a separate pot support that turns your Jet Boil Flash into a regular backpacking stove if you had an extra pot pan set or mess kit and didn't want to cook and prepare each item separately in the same pot (purchased separately at Cabela's $10, to add this you just unscrew the jet boil pot off the base burner and the pot support locks in and can support typical backpacking pots and pans just like the Optimus crux solo lite ). Jet boil flash has a rubberized cap that covers the pot/lid I found it tends to pop off in my rucksack at times whereas Camp chef Stryker has a metal toggle that locks the cap/lid onto the top of the pot for storage. Jetboil provides a plastic cover that covers where the stove screws onto the base of the pot where the special fins are to protect against damage where Camp chef Stryker doesn't offer that option. Jet boil Flash had a cloth handle built into to neoprene cover on the pot whereas Camp chef Stryker has a plastic and metal handle.
Both have their ups and downs, both perform well so it would boil down to accessories, cost, and staying together while packed inside your pack.
Jet boil offers accessories, has protective cover fins and fuel canister 100G fits inside, I bought mine for $100 plus $10 coffee press, plus $10 for the pot support
Camp chef Stryker has a larger pot but isn't tall enough for fuel storage, no accessories as of yet, I bought kids $70 ea. Hope this helps if anyone was wondering what the difference between Jet Boil Flash and the Camp chef Stryker and pros and cons as well as other camp food ideas others use. Note we have yet to go more than 2 days backpacking so with that being said is why I don't mind the added weight of gear and food, if we were to go for a week or more then yes I would definitely be considering lighter food options.