Author Topic: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?  (Read 27144 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #50 on: February 28, 2012, 08:31:28 AM »
Hey Outdoorist...  what is the name of the pan set on the upper right side?  The rectangle one?  I like the looks of that one.

I'm envious of your collection. :)   

And I've come to like the looks of the Open Country pots too.

And now I'm going to go investigate the GI mess kit.

I had bought a cheap coleman set..  everything sticks to it..and the pot is a joke.  **sigh**

WoodsWoman.

 In my latest Sportsman's Guide Military Surplus catalog they are selling the GI mess kits,  unissued for $18.00 dollars,  also on special are used but in excellent condition Norwegian military mess kits for $18.00 for three,  GI Canteen cups,  2 for $18.00,  German Military four piece utensil sets , again 3 for $18.00 bucks.
 Danish Military nylon tarps with gromets every 18"'s, condition- like new, size- 6'x8'.
 New unissued Army Reserves backpacks, 1,458 cu. in. cap., Army Digital pattern,  $27.00 bucks.
 Mil.spec. fire steels 3 for $15.00 dollars.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #51 on: March 01, 2012, 10:56:37 PM »
Hey Outdoorist...  what is the name of the pan set on the upper right side?  The rectangle one?  I like the looks of that one.

I'm envious of your collection. :)   

And I've come to like the looks of the Open Country pots too.

And now I'm going to go investigate the GI mess kit.

I had bought a cheap coleman set..  everything sticks to it..and the pot is a joke.  **sigh**

WoodsWoman.

 In my latest Sportsman's Guide Military Surplus catalog they are selling the GI mess kits,  unissued for $18.00 dollars,  also on special are used but in excellent condition Norwegian military mess kits for $18.00 for three,  GI Canteen cups,  2 for $18.00,  German Military four piece utensil sets , again 3 for $18.00 bucks.
 Danish Military nylon tarps with gromets every 18"'s, condition- like new, size- 6'x8'.
 New unissued Army Reserves backpacks, 1,458 cu. in. cap., Army Digital pattern,  $27.00 bucks.
 Mil.spec. fire steels 3 for $15.00 dollars.

  Just in case anyone missed this.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Professor

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #52 on: March 03, 2012, 06:26:28 AM »
How many mess kits does one need? Probably just one, but from where I am sitting, I can touch 3 or 4 and there are 2 more across the room; then there are a couple in the truck, more in the basement, and that doesn't start into my cabin cook gear which stays there year around.

With all of that, the set-up I have used on my January and February overnights and day trips is this old juice can with a wire bail.  I also have a SS cup and a Gatorade bottle for water.  It nests together and drops in a bag made from a pant leg.

No need for a pot hanger.  The tall cylindrical geometry lends itself to heating best from the side heat from the fire. Sit it where the flames blow up against it and it boils water fast for tea, coffee or other heat-and-eat meals.

When it warms up enough for my 4-wheeler to start, and I get too hot packing up the hills afoot, I will carry more food and more gear for cooking.  But for now, this has been a fun way to go!







« Last Edit: March 03, 2012, 06:28:04 AM by Professor »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #53 on: March 03, 2012, 08:24:40 AM »
How many mess kits does one need? Probably just one, but from where I am sitting, I can touch 3 or 4 and there are 2 more across the room; then there are a couple in the truck, more in the basement, and that doesn't start into my cabin cook gear which stays there year around.

With all of that, the set-up I have used on my January and February overnights and day trips is this old juice can with a wire bail.  I also have a SS cup and a Gatorade bottle for water.  It nests together and drops in a bag made from a pant leg.

No need for a pot hanger.  The tall cylindrical geometry lends itself to heating best from the side heat from the fire. Sit it where the flames blow up against it and it boils water fast for tea, coffee or other heat-and-eat meals.

When it warms up enough for my 4-wheeler to start, and I get too hot packing up the hills afoot, I will carry more food and more gear for cooking.  But for now, this has been a fun way to go!





  If only my life was that simple. :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #54 on: March 03, 2012, 10:04:46 AM »
Hey Outdoorist...  what is the name of the pan set on the upper right side?  The rectangle one?  I like the looks of that one.

I'm envious of your collection. :)   

And I've come to like the looks of the Open Country pots too.

And now I'm going to go investigate the GI mess kit.

I had bought a cheap coleman set..  everything sticks to it..and the pot is a joke.  **sigh**

WoodsWoman.

 In my latest Sportsman's Guide Military Surplus catalog they are selling the GI mess kits,  unissued for $18.00 dollars,  also on special are used but in excellent condition Norwegian military mess kits for $18.00 for three,  GI Canteen cups,  2 for $18.00,  German Military four piece utensil sets , again 3 for $18.00 bucks.
 Danish Military nylon tarps with gromets every 18"'s, condition- like new, size- 6'x8'.
 New unissued Army Reserves backpacks, 1,458 cu. in. cap., Army Digital pattern,  $27.00 bucks.
 Mil.spec. fire steels 3 for $15.00 dollars.

  Just in case anyone missed this.

You buy from the Sportsmans Guide military surplus catalog?  I feel betrayed  :'(  Seriously, some of their stuff is priced right, many military surplus items have gone through the roof recently on the wholesale level. 
Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved? One should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, it is much safer to be feared than loved.

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #55 on: March 03, 2012, 11:46:43 AM »
Sportsman's Guide was really, really nice back in the 1990s. They had some really unique stuff that I got a lot of enjoyment out of...

Not so much now... Prices are much higher and things often go out of stock or backorder quicker than the catalogs get to ya.

I'd like to find a new outlet for Euro gear... Centerfire Systems doesn't have bad prices, but little stock.
"My common sense is tingling..."

Offline Sealegs

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #56 on: March 03, 2012, 12:52:22 PM »
I have a bunch but I tend to go back and forth between the m40 Swedish mess-kit and an old Trangia hiker.





It kind of depends on how many I'm cooking for and what time of year it is. I do have a USGI cup that I use sometimes when I'm out by my lonesome sometimes, but the m40 is still more common even then.

I'd love to get my hands on the new Swedish "mess-kit", now named "soldiers stove". It's nearly all off the shelf stuff from Katadyne group. But in the army version it's a bit scaled down, no fancy colors and it all fits together in a LBE medium sized pocket. Gas, alky and the possibility to hang pots over open fire all in one.



Edit:
I thought I'd add a short note on why the Swedish army feels a need to add bails and whatnot to all our cooking gear. This goes back to the antiquated notion that when in need a soldier should be able to cook by fire. Since you would then want to try and hide said fire as best you can we always dig a fire pit with out shovels (that they also feel a particular need to force us to lug around) and put a pot holder over it. So you can hang a long row of mess-kits over one small pit and switch them around for heat distribution.

Apparently we've been doing this since way, way back when. 1830-40 at least and I'm not terribly sure that this was the first time the Army had us digging fire pits either.

As odd as I am I still find myself doing this and I delude myself into thinking it's good for keeping a fire contained as well. I just like my fire pits. :D
« Last Edit: March 03, 2012, 12:59:58 PM by Sealegs »
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #57 on: March 03, 2012, 01:05:01 PM »
Sealegs, do you have a few pictures of your firepits in action?  I'd love to see them. 
If you could make a new post on your firepits that would be wonderful.   


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Sealegs

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #58 on: March 03, 2012, 01:26:03 PM »
I'll snap a few pictures, it's really just a small hole in the ground.

You either remove just the top layer if you don't have to worry about detection and whatnot, or dig a deeper pit. Scouts and army squads usually dig a small trench next to a lean to. Fire reflector on the other side (drying moist wood/reflecting heat) and noggins towards the flames.

I can type out the instructions.

Eldgrop

If denaturated alcohol is not to be found, a simple firepit can be fashioned over which the entire squads mess kits can be heated simultaneously.

1. Choose a suitable and hidden place adjacent to the bivouac or shelter. Dig a pit that is 40-50cm deep (about 16-20inch) and 40cm wide (about 16inch) and somewhat longer than the collective width of all the mess kits put together.

2. Fill the pit with wood and start a fire. It might possibly need to be further hidden, especially during darkness.

3. A long enough piece of wood is hung at just the right height over the pit that the mess kits are just above the flames/embers. It is placed on Y supports on either side of the pit. Make them adjustable or simply cut to the right length from the start.

4. Hang the mess-kits side by side over the fire. If possible move them around to distribute the heat.


I rarely dig that deep now days though but a fire pit is always easy to fill in after wards. No bush fires for me.

Edit:
Oh, also

Smaller pit by young people. (borrowed from a Swedish forum http://forum.soldf.com/index.php?/topic/23655-oeverlevnad/ )

Also, Swedish fine dining-firepit!
A restaurant where no food is cooked by electricity or gas. Only wood powered fire. Firepit, wooden stove and wood fired owen. The chefs split their own wood in the back of the kitchen.

Newspaper article.
http://www.metro.se/noje/mat-orgasm-helt-utan-el/EVHklh!LUNKnPxVQhKw/
Somewhat disorienting homepage of the chef.
http://www.ekstedt.nu/index_en.html
« Last Edit: March 03, 2012, 01:34:31 PM by Sealegs »
"On little shores, and little seas, live people of little sense.
The world is half as wide, where the people are half as wise."

Offline Moe M.

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #59 on: March 03, 2012, 01:41:23 PM »
Hey Outdoorist...  what is the name of the pan set on the upper right side?  The rectangle one?  I like the looks of that one.

I'm envious of your collection. :)   

And I've come to like the looks of the Open Country pots too.

And now I'm going to go investigate the GI mess kit.

I had bought a cheap coleman set..  everything sticks to it..and the pot is a joke.  **sigh**

WoodsWoman.

 In my latest Sportsman's Guide Military Surplus catalog they are selling the GI mess kits,  unissued for $18.00 dollars,  also on special are used but in excellent condition Norwegian military mess kits for $18.00 for three,  GI Canteen cups,  2 for $18.00,  German Military four piece utensil sets , again 3 for $18.00 bucks.
 Danish Military nylon tarps with gromets every 18"'s, condition- like new, size- 6'x8'.
 New unissued Army Reserves backpacks, 1,458 cu. in. cap., Army Digital pattern,  $27.00 bucks.
 Mil.spec. fire steels 3 for $15.00 dollars.

  Just in case anyone missed this.

You buy from the Sportsmans Guide military surplus catalog?  I feel betrayed  :'(  Seriously, some of their stuff is priced right, many military surplus items have gone through the roof recently on the wholesale level.

  I do on occasion when they have some unissued GI Surplus that I'm looking for at super prices,  I'm waiting for an order now,  I picked up an unissued Army Reserve back pack for $26.00,  the nylon tarp for $14.00, a new unissued GI mess kit for under $20.00 bucks and three ferro rods for $12.00, all at member price.
 Knowing a little about small business,  I'm assuming that the chances of your having a stock of unissued surplus US gear,  and at those prices is unlikely.

  But rest assured that for anything else you're my go to guy,  matter of fact if you check your PM's you'll find my request for an order.   :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #60 on: March 04, 2012, 08:45:12 AM »


You're going out for an overnight. Your food might be dry, requiring water to hydrate. You might carry canned meat. Who knows... What you cook isn't as important as what you carry.
[size=78%] but really, this is about preparing food for one person, one meal at a time right? It's an 18oz pot - l[/size][size=78%].[/size]

My choice is based on my pack/kit size. I don't go ultralight or minimalist exactly, I'm just frugal.

Anyway!

What would/do you use, and why?


I use different items all the time. I have the US mil. canteen/cup/case, a couple of SS & a couple Alum. bottles, an old Boy scout messkit (Colemans is just about the same), an old pint size blue enamel mug, & a SS 1qt. pot with lid, a couple of homemade billycans of different sizes... Oh, & a cheap metal spoon & fork.   I have other stuff too, cast iron pans, coffee pots, etc, but I don't haul them for an overnight.


For an daytrip or overnite, I usually just grab something & throw in the haversack/ruck to use. But I like to carry the old blue mug( nostalgia & memories), A SS bottle or 2, the most. I also often like the messkit along. But on a whim, I may grab some of the other stuff instead. I use fire the most for cooking & they all can be used for that. Sometimes I carry a homemade can stove, w/alchohol, but rarely. I like my fires. ;)
I guess I try to be as simplistic & lightweight as possible. Try to use just what I can get by with, & if I need something like a spoon or fork, if I forget to bring them I make some. Sometimes, if I brought canned food of some sort, I may just cook it in the can & then pack the can back out. I try to "make" a lot of what I use. If I want to cook up a hotdog/weiner,  just make a prong out of a forked stick. To cook bacon/bannock I throw it on a stick, & to cook up a nice venison or beefsteak that was brought, I just do it shishkabob style, or make a "grill" out of some green sticks. ( LOL , I guess I use "sticks" a lot. :) ).


As far as far as adult refreshments I see posted, I sometimes use one of the bottles to hold some type of that stuff, hard or soft. ;)


I don't know if the label, "minimalist", is correct for me, but I just like to try to keep things simple & carry as little as possible to do what I want & need to do...


Sorry for the long post. I think I got to rambling a bit.
 :)
« Last Edit: March 04, 2012, 08:48:42 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #61 on: March 04, 2012, 10:03:49 AM »
Rambling is just fine - we're similar in our carrying mentality. It's not exactly minimalist - it's just enough. ;)
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #62 on: March 04, 2012, 12:25:31 PM »
I was doing some surfing last night looking for a smaller wok with lid.     I found a 10 inch one and I would love to pick it up.  I think a wok is a good all around handy thing to have out there in the woods or in a survival situation.   

I have a larger one that I've used for many ways of cooking...not just a quick stir fry.  One can even bake with it.  And another site talked about being able to smoke in it too.   

WW.

 
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: So, really, how much cook kit does one need?
« Reply #63 on: March 05, 2012, 08:44:29 AM »
I was doing some surfing last night looking for a smaller wok with lid.     I found a 10 inch one and I would love to pick it up.  I think a wok is a good all around handy thing to have out there in the woods or in a survival situation.   

I have a larger one that I've used for many ways of cooking...not just a quick stir fry.  One can even bake with it.  And another site talked about being able to smoke in it too.   

WW.

  Not an honest to goodness wok,  but I have used it for a wok,  and two of them clipped together make a good small oven.
  If you have any discount stores near you,  they usually carry stainless steel bowls in different sizes for cheap money,  I've got a couple of six inch ones that I carry for extended (three day week ends) treks,  I've painted the outside of them with black grill paint to help make it easier to clean,  and I keep a small vice grip that works well as a pot holder.
 They nest together well,  and when you pack you can carry dry food or a dish towel inside them to save room.
  You just clamp the vice grip on the rolled edge of the bowl like a handle,  and use the bowl over a small bed of coals just like you would a wok,  I usually use a glove as the handle can get hot at times,  but it work good, and they are pretty light to carry,  mine cost me about $3.95 each.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.