Author Topic: Mustard Patina  (Read 9986 times)

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Online PetrifiedWood

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Mustard Patina
« on: February 20, 2012, 02:31:27 PM »
Most of you probably already know all about this, but for those who don't...

This is a nice way to get a striped patina on a carbon steel blade. First, make sure the blade is very clean. you can wipe it with alcohol first.

Then using a silicone basting brush (the kind with silicone "noodles" for bristles), bush on a very thin coat of yellow mustard. If the coat is too thick, you will not get a good patina. The coat needs to be thins so that oxygen can react with the steel and the acids in the mustard.







As you can see from the photos, the dark portions are where the mustard was thinnest, and the light portions are where it was thickest.

It makes a nice striped effect that seems to be fairly durable even after the blade has been used to split wood. Eventually, a natural patina will take over and obscure the stripes. If you mess up, you can use some metal polish to remove the patina and then clean all traces of the polish off and try again.
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #1 on: February 20, 2012, 03:29:11 PM »
I got the patina on this...



By sticking it into a giant potato.

I put those osage scales on that knife a couple years back and gave it to my dad as a gift. I did it with bad sandpaper and a dremel that was on it's last legs. First knife I ever worked on like that.

Love those GRKs, but they are a mite thin.
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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #2 on: February 20, 2012, 05:28:00 PM »
Potato does a fine job as well. :)

For that matter the darkest, best patinas I've ever seen were on machetes and cane knives that have seen a lot of use chopping "juicy" plants like thistles and vines, etc. Elderberry saplings leave a nice patina as well.
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Offline madmax

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #3 on: February 20, 2012, 05:29:53 PM »
It sure helps with slowing rust from forming.
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Offline easy_rider75

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2012, 07:06:36 PM »
Damn tempting to try  this on my  Mora but I like a shiny edge LOL
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Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2012, 09:52:28 AM »
I have this little BHK Frontier Trapper.  I got an uneven natural patina on it from cleaning out some pheasants a while ago from the natural acidity in the bird blood etc.  (You can't notice it too much in the picture.)  I decided to force a patina on it with mustard and a basting brush.  Here are my before and after shots of it.


« Last Edit: March 30, 2012, 09:54:12 AM by MATT CHAOS »
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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2012, 11:02:16 AM »
Looks nice, those basting brushes really make the stripes work well.
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Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2012, 11:11:37 AM »
Looks nice, those basting brushes really make the stripes work well.

Thanks.  As you can probably tell, I did not leave the mustard on very long, hence the light patina.  I am debating about giving it a second dose of mustard and leaving it on a lot longer.
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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2012, 11:15:01 AM »
Looks nice, those basting brushes really make the stripes work well.

Thanks.  As you can probably tell, I did not leave the mustard on very long, hence the light patina.  I am debating about giving it a second dose of mustard and leaving it on a lot longer.

It is a little light. If you go for it a second time, remember thin is the key so oxygen can react with the steel. And the appearance of a little rust is normal, it will turn black as you scrub the mustard off in the sink.
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Offline Saintnick001

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2012, 11:29:40 AM »
I've done this on a couple blades as well. I really like the look when you sharpen them and they have a nice duotone effect.
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Offline warren bond

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2012, 12:58:18 PM »
I got the patina on this using mustard and vinegar mix :)


Offline Saintnick001

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2012, 01:38:46 PM »
That's a nice looking piece Warren!
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Offline warren bond

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2012, 02:58:27 AM »
Thanks Nick.

Offline Backwoodschuck

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Mustard Patina
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2012, 09:42:07 AM »
That is so cool

Offline Gryphon

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2012, 05:22:47 PM »
I use a spray bottle of white vinegar.  Makes spots!

Like the stripes with the mustard.  Darker than the vinegar.  I'll have to play with that!
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2012, 08:07:33 PM »
About how long do you let it sit on the knife before washing it off? 

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2012, 09:52:42 PM »
About how long do you let it sit on the knife before washing it off? 

WW.

I let it get mostly dry. I guess somewhere between 15 to 45 minutes. Not very precise, I know. :D
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2012, 10:01:05 PM »
Oh shooot..... *runs for the kitchen*....   I was thinking you'd say over night......

I best go save my knife....

edit:   Plochmans mustard must not be the brand to use?  I rinsed and theres not a single mark on this Mora blade.     And it does say Carbon on it.   

I'm striking 0 today for some reason... lol

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« Last Edit: April 06, 2012, 10:05:11 PM by WoodsWoman »
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #18 on: April 06, 2012, 10:40:05 PM »
Leave it on overnight and wrap the blade in a paper towel I have used that brand on a few knives.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #19 on: April 06, 2012, 11:06:08 PM »
Smokewalker.. wont the motion of wrapping the blade with the papertowel moosh up the lines?   Or am I not supposed to let it touch the mustard?   

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On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #20 on: April 06, 2012, 11:35:55 PM »
Does it have vinegar as an ingredient?

Remember it needs to go on very thin so oxygen can react with the steel. If it's coated completely with a film of mustard so that no air can touch the steel, it won't react nearly as fast.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #21 on: April 06, 2012, 11:42:43 PM »
I put it on with a thin paint brush..  I could see through the mustard.  Maybe too thin?    And it sat for about two hours.    Theres not even a hint of the markings.

Could it be that the metal needs something stronger than alcohol to clean it since its a well used knife?

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Gryphon

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2012, 11:17:55 PM »
With vinegar, I let it set two or three hours.  I have let it go overnight before with no ill effects.

Good mustard is not the stuff to use.  Get the el-cheapo nasty no-name yellow stuff.  Ingredients should read something like: vinegar, vinegar, toxic waste, salt, high fructose corn syrup, vinegar, cat poop, wheat gluten, mustard powder, vinegar, artificial flavors made from yak anal glands and preservatives.

The paper towel is to keep it from drying too much and let it work longer.  Only problem I have had with that is the towel sticks to the blade and gives it the same pattern as the towel.  Ok if you like cross-hatching and Hello Kitty clouds, not so much if you don't.

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Online PetrifiedWood

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #23 on: April 08, 2012, 12:09:38 AM »
:lol: :rofl:
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #24 on: April 08, 2012, 12:28:57 AM »
LOL Gryphon.....      Thanks for the explanation.   I'll have to give it another shot.


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On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Online wolfy

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Re: Mustard Patina
« Reply #25 on: April 08, 2012, 10:01:23 AM »
Now I know why my patina was less than stellar, also....my mustard didn't contain yak anal glands in the list of ingredients  :shrug:
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