Author Topic: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES  (Read 30727 times)

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Offline wolfy

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DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« on: August 18, 2012, 10:28:43 AM »
I was doing some multiple D.O. cooking a couple of nights ago and, while tending my 'flock' of five that I had going for this gathering, a gal asked me what tools we found most useful in getting started and making the process easier and more efficient.

I thought it might be useful to new users or folks wanting to get started, to list or discuss some of the items we find most useful around the campfire.  A discussion of dealing with dead ashes that insulates the ovens from the heat of fresh coals ensued.  That gave me an idea for this thread.....to help new users get started off successfully and old users to pass on some of the ideas on tools that they have found most useful.  NO BADGES will be offered for any useful information you would like to add 8). I just thought this would add to everyones' enjoyment and skill-level in D.O. cooking.  My wife and I have been doing this together since we got married and it was one of the few things that I had been doing for a long time that she took to readily.  I just wish she shared my enthusiasm for fleshing and brain-tanning deer hides, half as much ;)

I will start out by offering a suggestion for one of the shovels that we use.  It looks something like this....
http://www.amateurgeologist.com/rockhound-tool-toolite-29-inch-square-end-sifting-shovel.html ,but is not nearly as expensive if you can make your own.  I went to Menard's when those 'el cheapo' light-duty garden tools were on sale and bought one of the D-handled square ended shovels.  I had my buddy cut out a rectangular section in the center of the bottom and weld a piece of expanded metal back over the hole on the inside.........it slides along the ground better if it's welded on the inside.  This makes a VERY handy tool for scooping coals out of a 'trench' fire pit......a little judicious jiggling of the shovelful of coals allows all of the dead and 'coal-smothering' gray ash to fall through the bottom of the shovel.  Now, when you transfer the shovelful of coals to the ovens you are not bringing along a bunch of dead ashes along with the good coals :thumbsup:

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Online madmax

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2012, 10:49:39 AM »
That is an awesome idea.  Thanks a bunch!
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Offline Bearhunter

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DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2012, 11:03:07 AM »
I like to use this while I'm cooking with my Dutch ovens on the wood stove.
It actually is fantastic. I couldn't believe how well it worked when we first got it!

http://www.campchef.com/dutch-oven-dome.html
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2012, 11:16:02 AM »
Wolfy, brilliant!

Bearhunter, what the heck is the fabric?


I like to use this while I'm cooking with my Dutch ovens on the wood stove.
It actually is fantastic. I couldn't believe how well it worked when we first got it!

http://www.campchef.com/dutch-oven-dome.html
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Offline Bearhunter

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DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2012, 11:24:45 AM »
Wolfy, brilliant!

Bearhunter, what the heck is the fabric?


I like to use this while I'm cooking with my Dutch ovens on the wood stove.
It actually is fantastic. I couldn't believe how well it worked when we first got it!

http://www.campchef.com/dutch-oven-dome.html

It's what they use for the space shuttles heat shields :p

Just kidding OP! I really don't know. It's some type of cloth with the liner sewn in.
Some kind of cloth fiberglass maybe?

We've had it going on 4 years now and we use it all the time when we're burning wood. It's held up well for us.
Also, we ordered it online thru Wally-word. It's cheaper there.
I would defiantly recommend one. If or when this one decides to fall apart, we'll get another one.
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Offline Bearhunter

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DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2012, 11:27:01 AM »
Another thing...
We don't just use it for our Dutch ovens. We use it to get things hot quickly when we need to. Even for boiling water quickly. We have found many uses for it.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2012, 11:27:27 AM »
That's pretty neat! I wonder if someone could make one out of polished aluminum sheets that are hinged to fold flat for storage?

Offline Bearhunter

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DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2012, 11:33:15 AM »
That's pretty neat! I wonder if someone could make one out of polished aluminum sheets that are hinged to fold flat for storage?
It folds flat.
But, I bet you could make something similar. It's made out of some kind of material that really holds in the heat and produces a convection oven.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2012, 11:35:35 AM by Bearhunter »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2012, 11:35:09 AM »
My standard fire "accessories":
The shovel is originally for a coal burning house furnace. The bellows is a hand-me-down from my Grandfather.
(Question of the Day: Is it really an 'antique', if it still gets used?  ;) )




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Offline Professor

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2012, 04:28:36 PM »
This is a good idea for a thread; thanks!

My accessories:

* a couple of old disc blades for setting the ovens on outdoors.  They are great for keeping coals under the ovens, leveling the oven easily.  In the fireplace, the hearth serves the same purpose.

* a lid lifter- The one I have came with one of my ovens, but there are several designs that are easily forged.

* a shovel for moving coals.  I have made them, but bought 2 or 3 more at Wal Mart on close-out for $1.50 each.  These are the sheet metal ones; they're light weight but for moving a few coals they work ok.

* a fire rake- basically a straight handle with a curved piece of flat metal on the end.  These are good to rake coals out of the fire and up onto the shovel. The idea for mine was adapted from a similar forge tool.   

* Kevlar glove - great for grabbing hot ovens, lids and tools

* a trivet that is great to set lids on when they come off the ovens to check, stir, or serve the food.  They keep the underside of the lid clean.





« Last Edit: August 18, 2012, 04:37:29 PM by Professor »
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2012, 12:03:41 AM »
Here's a list of videos that I brought over from www.camp-cook.com .......



This guy and his wife are pretty good at slingin' iron.....enjoy!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #11 on: August 28, 2012, 12:21:15 AM »
Here's a list of videos that I brought over from www.camp-cook.com .......

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLF965C2D13FFEBDE9&feature=plcp

This guy and his wife are pretty good at slingin' iron.....enjoy!
Nice collection! Thanks!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #12 on: August 28, 2012, 05:14:23 AM »
Quote from: Old Philosopher

(Question of the Day: Is it really an 'antique', if it still gets used?  ;) )



  It's an antique if it's over thirty years old,  after fifty it's a relic,  after seventy years old it's an artifact,  you do understand the inplication,  right,  even when still being used .... or abused.   :)
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2012, 08:45:13 AM »

  It's an antique if it's over thirty years old,  after fifty it's a relic,  after seventy years old it's an artifact,  you do understand the inplication,  right,  even when still being used .... or abused.   :)
LOL! I prefer the term "vintage".  8) I think I have a T-shirt around here somewhere......
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #14 on: August 28, 2012, 10:25:44 AM »
OK, time for another 'accessory'......a whiskbroom.  They're kinda' nice to have for getting rid of loose ash on the lid, especially in the wind.  Keeps the ash from getting blown into the food when taking the lid off.  I made mine from a little crop of broomcorn I grew in my garden one year :thumbsup:
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #15 on: August 28, 2012, 10:32:03 AM »
Briskbroom.   Have you tried finding one now a days?   I've been keeping an eye open for one for years.  I want one for in my car to sweep out the sand/gravel.    And now that I've got camp ovens I cant find anything thats not plastic bristles.     

I bushcrafted a simple broom out of a handfull of pine needles and a stick with some wire the last time I was out there cookin.   Didnt last all that long tho...  tossed it into the fire when I was done.   But it did the job for that perticular cook.

I'm wishing I had a lid lifter tho.    Anyone make a homemade one?  Or will I need a welder?   :S      Right now I'm just using a pair of thick leather gloves to grab the lids.

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Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #16 on: August 28, 2012, 10:59:57 AM »
Briskbroom.   Have you tried finding one now a days?   I've been keeping an eye open for one for years.  I want one for in my car to sweep out the sand/gravel.    And now that I've got camp ovens I cant find anything thats not plastic bristles.     

I bushcrafted a simple broom out of a handfull of pine needles and a stick with some wire the last time I was out there cookin.   Didnt last all that long tho...  tossed it into the fire when I was done.   But it did the job for that perticular cook.

I'm wishing I had a lid lifter tho.    Anyone make a homemade one?  Or will I need a welder?   :S      Right now I'm just using a pair of thick leather gloves to grab the lids.

WW.

    Lid lifters at Walmart for six dollars in the cast iron section.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #17 on: August 28, 2012, 11:01:58 AM »
Briskbroom.   Have you tried finding one now a days?   I've been keeping an eye open for one for years.  I want one for in my car to sweep out the sand/gravel.    And now that I've got camp ovens I cant find anything thats not plastic bristles.     

I bushcrafted a simple broom out of a handfull of pine needles and a stick with some wire the last time I was out there cookin.   Didnt last all that long tho...  tossed it into the fire when I was done.   But it did the job for that perticular cook.

I'm wishing I had a lid lifter tho.    Anyone make a homemade one?  Or will I need a welder?   :S      Right now I'm just using a pair of thick leather gloves to grab the lids.

WW.
I use a simple lid lifter like this one on Amazon for $10. I don't use my D.O. that much, and it works for me. Any place that sells cast iron should have one on the shelf.

http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-Camp-Dutch-Oven-Lifter/dp/B0000TPDJE/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346172965&sr=8-1&keywords=Dutch+Oven+lid+lifter

I can't believe you're having a hard time finding a natural bristle whiskbroom. Both O'Cedar and Rubermaid make them. Under $10.
The Rubermaid one:

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Offline Gryphon

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2012, 03:38:11 PM »
Pair of pliers.  I use my multitool.  Great for grabbing most anything hot.

Most of the rest I either have or is on my wishlist ...especially the perforated shovel!  I may go get a chinese e-tool and take it to the drill press...and the bellows.  Wished for one of those a couple times now.  May have to make one.

My lid lifter is a whalfart special.  Works great.  I need a trivet for sure.

I keep my DO in a kitty litter bucket.  Fits the oven, an aluminum cook-pan that I use as an ashtray if I'm in an area with no ground fires.  Set a couple bricks on a picnic table, then the tray and cook right there.

I also have a stuff brass and heavy nylon bristle brush and a plastic scraper from Pampered CHef for their stoneware.  Makes cleaning up heavy crud off the iron a LOT easier.

I also stock a roll of paper towels, a container of kosher salt (I like the big grains) and a can of pray cooking oil for cleaning and maintaining.

Oh yeah...TONGS!!!!  I have a few sets of long stainless steel tongs.  I can pick up lids, move coals, stir food and it hold the wadded paper towels for oiling the FREEKING HOT iron without burning my poor fingers...again.

I also always have my sunglasses with me.  A pair of clear safety glasses helps too.  My eyes are sensitive and sometimes I just can't get my face that close to a fire to work the iron without them...especially if we are cooking to the side of a campfire or in a pit because of the wind out here in the desert.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2013, 12:46:43 PM »
I see people still visiting this thread once in a while, so when I saw a 'guest' looking at it today I read through it again myself.  In doing so, I found that no one (including me) has mentioned the BEST lid lifter on the market, bar NONE......MAIR!  MADE IN THE U.S. A.!  :thumbsup: :banana:

http://mairdutchovenlifter.com/

Lodge has one that is similar now, too, but it is made in China and costs you more of your hard-earned frogskins to boot. >:(
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2013, 01:00:47 PM »
I'm glad this one came up again.. :)

Since I've posted on this thread I've acquired a lid lifter from the link you posted. A charcoal starter thingy (looks like a coffee can with handle and holes).  A smaller Dutch oven and a griddle.  A pair of leather gloves and tongs.   

I still need a shovel, and trivet. And a cast iron bacon press (with piggy please). And I'd like to find a sturdy small table to park next to this new kitchen.  :)

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Offline SIXFOOTER

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2013, 05:07:40 PM »
I started out in life cooking On/In cast iron and in the last few years have rediscovered it. I have several DO's and skillets and a griddle. I have a regular lid lifter and it seems to work fine for me. Today I was teaching Blacksmithing to the boy scouts and one of the other guys got a request from one of the BSA guys for a Tall version of the lid lifter, it was produced and all were appropriately thrilled with it.
The fancy one with the moving parts looks neat and all that but I have never felt the need.
I think I'll forge up a batch of trivets though for give-aways and the next Krack trip.
I also make fireplace and camp fire cooking tools, so some of the things I use (no pics at the moment) are a "fireplace stand", 2 vertical tall stakes with a loop on top and a horizontal between them to hang hooks, pots, pans and DO's on. I make pokers, shovels and the like, fire tongs and all that.
I think I'll make a batch of grills to hang off the horizontals, be good to set a regular pan on, warmer rack or meat grill.
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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2013, 05:20:30 PM »
I started out in life cooking On/In cast iron and in the last few years have rediscovered it. I have several DO's and skillets and a griddle. I have a regular lid lifter and it seems to work fine for me. Today I was teaching Blacksmithing to the boy scouts and one of the other guys got a request from one of the BSA guys for a Tall version of the lid lifter, it was produced and all were appropriately thrilled with it.
The fancy one with the moving parts looks neat and all that but I have never felt the need.
I think I'll forge up a batch of trivets though for give-aways and the next Krack trip.
I also make fireplace and camp fire cooking tools, so some of the things I use (no pics at the moment) are a "fireplace stand", 2 vertical tall stakes with a loop on top and a horizontal between them to hang hooks, pots, pans and DO's on. I make pokers, shovels and the like, fire tongs and all that.
I think I'll make a batch of grills to hang off the horizontals, be good to set a regular pan on, warmer rack or meat grill.

I've got some of Sixfooter's camp fire cooking tools, and they're great. I've got the Fireplace Stand set and the squirrel cooker set. These are great tools that will easily last my lifetime and beyond.

The hanging grill sounds like a great idea.

Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2013, 05:46:30 PM »
I started out in life cooking On/In cast iron and in the last few years have rediscovered it. I have several DO's and skillets and a griddle. I have a regular lid lifter and it seems to work fine for me. Today I was teaching Blacksmithing to the boy scouts and one of the other guys got a request from one of the BSA guys for a Tall version of the lid lifter, it was produced and all were appropriately thrilled with it.
The fancy one with the moving parts looks neat and all that but I have never felt the need.
I think I'll forge up a batch of trivets though for give-aways and the next Krack trip.
I also make fireplace and camp fire cooking tools, so some of the things I use (no pics at the moment) are a "fireplace stand", 2 vertical tall stakes with a loop on top and a horizontal between them to hang hooks, pots, pans and DO's on. I make pokers, shovels and the like, fire tongs and all that.
I think I'll make a batch of grills to hang off the horizontals, be good to set a regular pan on, warmer rack or meat grill.
I use a pretty simple hook-type lifter at rendezvous that I built about 35 years ago and it works fine and I've got all the bells & whistles you list, too, but the MAIR-type lifter is a real handy item when handling a half-dozen or so ovens at a time.  It speeds up the moving of the lids from oven to trivet or lid stand without having to concentrate on balancing the lid with the simple hook.  They also completely eliminate those 'Woops' moments altogether :-[.    Where it REALLY comes in handy is tipping the lid to dump dead or dying coals.  They are an ingenious invention that gives COMPLETE control of hot ash-laden lids.  Most people that have ever used one would never be without it!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2013, 07:25:23 PM »

I use a pretty simple hook-type lifter at rendezvous that I built about 35 years ago and it works fine and I've got all the bells & whistles you list, too, but the MAIR-type lifter is a real handy item when handling a half-dozen or so ovens at a time.  It speeds up the moving of the lids from oven to trivet or lid stand without having to concentrate on balancing the lid with the simple hook.  They also completely eliminate those 'Woops' moments altogether :-[ .    Where it REALLY comes in handy is tipping the lid to dump dead or dying coals.  They are an ingenious invention that gives COMPLETE control of hot ash-laden lids.  Most people that have ever used one would never be without it!

I want one so bad I can taste it! I have a hook 'n' bar lifter that broke, and hasn't been replaced. +1 on the ability to dump the ashes without performing a balancing act!
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Offline imnukensc

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2013, 07:33:37 PM »
Heck, I thought I was the DO accessory!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2013, 07:44:39 PM »
Heck, I thought I was the DO accessory!
My cats own me. My dog owns me. Why not my DOs, too?
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2013, 08:17:40 PM »
The Lodge lifter would be pretty easy to replicate.....

http://www.lodgemfg.com/cooking-accessories/deluxe-lid-lifter

If you click on the picture to enlarge it you can see that the sliding mechanism is comprised of a piece of square stock inside of a piece of square tubing.  The rest of it just needs a couple of easy welds and PRESTO, you have become a patent pirate! :-X
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2013, 08:32:06 PM »
The Lodge lifter would be pretty easy to replicate.....

http://www.lodgemfg.com/cooking-accessories/deluxe-lid-lifter

If you click on the picture to enlarge it you can see that the sliding mechanism is comprised of a piece of square stock inside of a piece of square tubing.  The rest of it just needs a couple of easy welds and PRESTO, you have become a patent pirate! :-X
One of my favorite hobbies is looking at stuff like that and saying, "I can make that!"
Whether I ever get around to doing it is quite another matter.... :P
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Offline Dano

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #29 on: November 16, 2013, 11:06:53 PM »
Question- does anyone use their DO with a tripod?  When we went to the Lodge factory store, they stocked two different lengths.  I almost got the shorter one, but then thought about all the times I've used my DO and never saw where the tripod would have made any difference.  Maybe I'm just used to using it on ground.

I watched a video where RM cooks bread in a DO over an open fire using a tripod.  I've always just used charcoal or coals and cooked it on the ground.  Maybe I'm stuck in a rut and am not looking outside the box??

The only time I've seen one used was with friends a few years ago.  He fashioned a tripod and had a large metal rack from an old freezer hanging from 3 chains.  We grilled the meat over the coals on the rack and had a DO sitting on the rack off to one side.  That's the only time in my life that I remember using a tripod with a DO....

Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #30 on: November 16, 2013, 11:44:34 PM »
I've been around them, but never owned one.  Most of the rigs I've cooked over were the traditional 'two uprights with crossbar' setups like the old chuckwagon cooks would have used.   Many of the rendezvous blacksmiths make these sets up for sale......that's where I got mine.   They can get quite elaborate and expensive, but the basic setup with a set of several different length 'S' hooks is a good setup to start with.  Many of them are designed to interlock on the ring-ends so you can make them into a tripod, too.   Personally I don't care for the tripod.....it always seemed like the legs were in the way & trying to tend something suspended on a chain while the pot or grill was swinging or turning was a huge PITA, but maybe I just wasn't used to it. ??? 

EDIT:  In post #9 you can see The Professor's setup.....much like mine & I'll bet he can hook those together to form a tripod, too. 
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #31 on: November 17, 2013, 01:07:53 AM »
Question- does anyone use their DO with a tripod?  When we went to the Lodge factory store, they stocked two different lengths.  I almost got the shorter one, but then thought about all the times I've used my DO and never saw where the tripod would have made any difference.  Maybe I'm just used to using it on ground.

I watched a video where RM cooks bread in a DO over an open fire using a tripod.  I've always just used charcoal or coals and cooked it on the ground.  Maybe I'm stuck in a rut and am not looking outside the box??

The only time I've seen one used was with friends a few years ago.  He fashioned a tripod and had a large metal rack from an old freezer hanging from 3 chains.  We grilled the meat over the coals on the rack and had a DO sitting on the rack off to one side.  That's the only time in my life that I remember using a tripod with a DO....
Not a tripod, but this is our rig. Pot o' beans on the side. The lid is off for the photo
That rack setup is portable, but not as portable as a tripod.



Same deal, but this time it's fried potatoes and onions.



Not sure what was in the DO this time around.

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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #32 on: November 17, 2013, 01:20:49 AM »
Those three pictures of that pit , OP, never ceases to make me drool...   I'd be giddy all summer long with a set up like that.  :)

WW.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #33 on: November 17, 2013, 07:43:26 AM »
Back in the days when we were first married and thinking about our 'dream' house, one of the things I wanted to build was one of those BIG colonial walk-in type fireplaces that included a hand-forged, swing out fire crane and a wide hearth that would accommodate tin bake ovens, Dutch ovens, trivets for legless pans, spits for roasting large cuts of meat or turkeys, etc. 

Alas, it never came to be, but Ol' P's setup comes close to what I'm talking about.  I've seen those for sale and remember him showing us those pictures before.  I'm thinking of doing the same thing with our permanent fire pit, too.  Right now, we just use ours with Dutch ovens and occasionally with a plain non-adjustable grill for chicken, steaks, etc.  I like this idea for the option of swinging the supports off the fire or moving the cooking food to warmer or cooler parts of the main fire.  Endless possibilities there!  :thumbsup:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #34 on: November 17, 2013, 09:15:28 AM »
Thanks! Like I posted when I first got that setup, my kid made it in h.s. welding shop. The only change I would make would be a bigger grill, with a 1/2" lip around it. Not a big project if you know how to use a 'stinger'.
This past summer, even with 3 charcoal BBQs and 2 gas BBQs, we did most of our outdoor cooking over the pit.
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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #35 on: November 17, 2013, 09:37:00 AM »
OD'P What keeps the grill and pot holder from falling down the main support? Is that a threaded tee on the back side for locking in place?

Offline Moe M.

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #36 on: November 17, 2013, 10:02:55 AM »
Back in the days when we were first married and thinking about our 'dream' house, one of the things I wanted to build was one of those BIG colonial walk-in type fireplaces that included a hand-forged, swing out fire crane and a wide hearth that would accommodate tin bake ovens, Dutch ovens, trivets for legless pans, spits for roasting large cuts of meat or turkeys, etc. 

Alas, it never came to be, but Ol' P's setup comes close to what I'm talking about.  I've seen those for sale and remember him showing us those pictures before.  I'm thinking of doing the same thing with our permanent fire pit, too.  Right now, we just use ours with Dutch ovens and occasionally with a plain non-adjustable grill for chicken, steaks, etc.  I like this idea for the option of swinging the supports off the fire or moving the cooking food to warmer or cooler parts of the main fire.  Endless possibilities there!  :thumbsup:

  A friend of mine's wife was a history buff and loved 18th. century antiques which she collected when possible,  there also was a nationally know artist who lived in our are who dabbled in all forms of art, painting, clay,  blacksmithing, and furniture.
  He got the idea to build a late 18th. century colonial home using the same materials and building methods used in the period,  he even forged all the nails and hardware by hand,  and got rough cut lumber and beams and hued them out to size with period tools,  he ended up building three of them until he was satisfied with the results.
  My friend and his wife bought the third one,  an exact replica of an 18th. century farm house,  it had a period pantry,  full kitchen/dining room with a huge working colonial fireplace complete with all the irons,  and even had a brick oven and warming closet built into the side of it.
  The house had seven rooms (three bedrooms) and a fireplace in each room,  but that fireplace is what always made me drool,  another friend of mine from CT., a fine builder of beautiful early American firearms (you can look him up on line at Blackhart Longarms),  he and his wife also built a colonial style home about 15 years ago that has a full cooking fireplace.

  But, if I ever get the chance to build a new kitchen in a different home I'd like to explore the type of kitchen featured in the cooking series of Jas.Townsend & Son.,  he has a little higher than normal counter that is topped off with fire brick,  at the rear of the counter is a built in brick wood burning oven,  on the side of the counter near one wall is a swing out cast iron pot holder, and there is a large "tin" chimney (hood) over the counter to vent out the smoke.
  As can be seen in their videos, he builds his cook fire right up on top of the counter,  he can hang a pot on the swing hook to boil water or make a stew,  he draws off coals and uses a spider or trivet to cook with or uses his dutch ovens,  its a great set up in that us old timers don't have to be kneeling by the fire place or stooping over to check how the grub is coming along.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #37 on: November 17, 2013, 10:03:53 AM »
OD'P What keeps the grill and pot holder from falling down the main support? Is that a threaded tee on the back side for locking in place?
This is the locking mechanism. But with the weight of the grill, and even the pot hook, the sleeves won't slip down due to the torque.

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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #38 on: November 17, 2013, 10:12:03 AM »
OD'P What keeps the grill and pot holder from falling down the main support? Is that a threaded tee on the back side for locking in place?
This is the locking mechanism. But with the weight of the grill, and even the pot hook, the sleeves won't slip down due to the torque.



Thanks, I now see how that works, great design. Gravity is a wonderful thing. I'm now in my backyard with a pork butt cooking on the smoker and some cinnamon rolls proofing in the Dutch oven, just looking where I can place a permanent fire pit in the backyard. I'd love to have something like this. Maybe I could talk Sixfooter into making me a custom rig? Thanks for the info.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #39 on: November 17, 2013, 10:30:48 AM »
With proper care, a fire ring like that is virtually a lifetime investment. Those bricks in the photo were carried from Washington 13 years ago, where they were used in a similar fire pit for 3 years before that. They cost all of about $.98/ea on sale at Home Depot.
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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #40 on: November 17, 2013, 10:49:18 AM »
With proper care, a fire ring like that is virtually a lifetime investment. Those bricks in the photo were carried from Washington 13 years ago, where they were used in a similar fire pit for 3 years before that. They cost all of about $.98/ea on sale at Home Depot.

Yup, I think that's the perfect design for me. As far as the bricks, is it gravity once again holding it all together, or did you use some construction adhesive to keep it all together?

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #41 on: November 17, 2013, 11:02:05 AM »
With proper care, a fire ring like that is virtually a lifetime investment. Those bricks in the photo were carried from Washington 13 years ago, where they were used in a similar fire pit for 3 years before that. They cost all of about $.98/ea on sale at Home Depot.

Yup, I think that's the perfect design for me. As far as the bricks, is it gravity once again holding it all together, or did you use some construction adhesive to keep it all together?
NO mortar. They are landscape blocks, and there is a lip on the forward bottom edge of each one. Gravity and friction is all they need to stay in place. Unless of course some drunk stumbles into the fire and kicks them over. Don't ask...... >:(
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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #42 on: November 17, 2013, 11:08:58 AM »
With proper care, a fire ring like that is virtually a lifetime investment. Those bricks in the photo were carried from Washington 13 years ago, where they were used in a similar fire pit for 3 years before that. They cost all of about $.98/ea on sale at Home Depot.

Yup, I think that's the perfect design for me. As far as the bricks, is it gravity once again holding it all together, or did you use some construction adhesive to keep it all together?
NO mortar. They are landscape blocks, and there is a lip on the forward bottom edge of each one. Gravity and friction is all they need to stay in place. Unless of course some drunk stumbles into the fire and kicks them over. Don't ask...... >:(
Sounds perfect. I think I've found my next weekend project. As far as a drunken stumble, it would probably be me doing that... Thanks again.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #43 on: November 17, 2013, 11:16:52 AM »

Sounds perfect. I think I've found my next weekend project. As far as a drunken stumble, it would probably be me doing that... Thanks again.
Oh, and BTW, that pipe that supports the whole cooking appliance makes a great launching tube for pop bottle rockets.  8)
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Offline Yellowyak

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #44 on: November 17, 2013, 11:20:24 AM »

Sounds perfect. I think I've found my next weekend project. As far as a drunken stumble, it would probably be me doing that... Thanks again.
Oh, and BTW, that pipe that supports the whole cooking appliance makes a great launching tube for pop bottle rockets.  8)

Bonus for that. I do happen to have some bottle rockets leftover from my last Tennessee trip. My neighbors are going to love my new setup...

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #45 on: November 17, 2013, 11:20:55 AM »
I looked into those blocks in the local garden center.  They were 2.39 each.  And they had a simular cook set up that you pound into the ground there.  I could tell right away it wasn't as sturdy as yours..and the price tag on this one here was 149.00. 

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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #46 on: November 17, 2013, 11:26:39 AM »

Oh, and BTW, that pipe that supports the whole cooking appliance makes a great launching tube for pop bottle rockets.  8)

Bonus for that. I do happen to have some bottle rockets leftover from my last Tennessee trip. My neighbors are going to love my new setup..

And when the cops show up, all the rocket sticks are down in the tube and there's no evidence.  ;D
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Offline Dano

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #47 on: November 17, 2013, 11:30:25 AM »
My aching bones are really begging for one of those cook stands, but for the price, I am going to try to scrounge one together.   The Lodge brand model is $250 and it's made in China.  Pretty sure I can scab something together for a lot less-won't be as pretty, but who cares!

Offline imnukensc

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #48 on: November 17, 2013, 12:55:49 PM »
My fire pit set up is similar to Op's and there's pictures of it on here already (somewhere) so I won't bother to post them again, but a close friend has one of these.  Kinda pricey at $200, but it is very heavy duty and he sure has cooked some good stuff on it.  Have seen these at both Sam's and Home Depot.



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Offline wolfy

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Re: DUTCH OVEN ACCESSORIES
« Reply #49 on: November 17, 2013, 01:02:20 PM »
Just thought of another D.O. accessory that I've owned since my days as a Boy Scout.....aluminum pot pliers.   You used to be able to get them (complete with the B.S.A fleur-de-lis logo) from the local B.S.A. equipment suppliers, but they have quit carrying them. :-\.    Fortunately, another company has begun selling a close copy....

http://frybake.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/potgripz.jpg

They're now $10 per copy, but at least they are available again! :).  Scroll down the page for the pliers, but also note the aluminum fry-bake ovens for backpacking...

http://frybake.com/
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX