Author Topic: Homemade bag  (Read 3134 times)

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Offline WoodsWoman

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Homemade bag
« on: February 22, 2012, 11:07:28 PM »
I'm looking for ideas for a bag to make to carry with me on short woods walks.  An over the shoulder type bag.  Just enough in it that if I get troubles I have what I need in it.   

Do you have one made?  What do you carry in it?  What is it made of?
 
Show and tell please.
Thanks.
WW. 
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Homemade bag
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2012, 12:25:53 AM »
I have several that I own.. Lots of surplus, really, and most gas mask bags. The problem with those, for me, is that I like my bags to hang low on my hip and not up above my waist. I think they were made for smaller (thinner) people than me. One option I tried was the MOLLE sustainment pouch, which has d rings so you can hoop up a custom strap (I got a nice one from strapworks.com). The problem with that is that it's TOO big. It's meant to hold a couple big MRE bags inside of it.

So, I think what will happen is that I will end up making my own, likely out of thin canvas, and probably Civil War style, though a mite wider to easily hold a Nalgene: http://www.jarnaginco.com/CWHaversacks.html. Another option, seen on a blog I visit regularly, is a monk's bag: http://manta-bushcraft.blogspot.com/2011/12/monks-bag.html

By making my own, I can make the strap just how I want it, or interchangeable if I use d rings (seeing as how I'm getting thinner).

Thing about haversacks is that you need to figure out how much you're willing to carry over your shoulder, so that it doesn't bear down and make you uncomfortable. Personally, I wouldn't carry more than 5-6lbs: Basic water, snacks, cup, and an "oh shiitake!" kit. Maybe a few other goodies as well. ;)
"My common sense is tingling..."

Offline Mr. Tettnanger

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Re: Homemade bag
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2012, 06:09:35 AM »
I have made many of these type of bags out of leather. I think that one of the best over the shoulder, day hike bags, on the cheap.....is the Finnish Gas Mask Bag!

I have several of them and LOVE them!

Offline Gurthy

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Re: Homemade bag
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2012, 07:25:41 AM »
I made a haversack last year from an old canvas military shelter half. I even carry it when I have my small backpack on because it is very good for gathering edibles and materials and also for keeping field guides handy. It's nothing special, but I'll post up pics a little later.

Edit- pic:

« Last Edit: February 23, 2012, 08:30:28 AM by Gurthy »

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Homemade bag
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2012, 09:56:27 AM »
Thats what I was looking for.   Thanks Guys!    I think I'll have to haul out my sewing machine today and see what I can find in the material tub.  :)

Just out of curiousity.. if you were to head out the door for a day trip a half hour from now..  What would you throw in it to take with you?

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Gurthy

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Re: Homemade bag
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2012, 11:07:50 AM »
Quart of water
Nesting cup
Knife or multitool
Fire Kit
Compass
Map
Snack food and tea
Small first aid kit
Whistle

Don't forget the PSK in your pockets!

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Homemade bag
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2012, 11:12:14 AM »
Well, let's assume I'm just going out for a walk with no real intentions other than to practice a few skills, do some plant/tree id, check out the sights, maybe gather a few things, have a snack/lunch, and maybe even fish.

First: I'm not fond of mint tin survival kits - that's me. I'd like my entire haversack to be a kit that I can use in case I am in trouble.

Secondly: This isn't a go/E&E/BOB bag. This is a hiking bag.

In no particular order:

1-Water! I'm not a fan of steel bottles because I can't see my water level, and they are heavier than a Nalgene plastic bottle, which is my preferred choice of water carry. 32oz bottle. I'd carry a few purification tablets if needed, but I'll also carry,

2-GSI Glacier cup! I have a couple of these, one for nesting with my bottle when hiking and one that is a cook kit for my overnight pack. As an option, I might carry a lightweight woodburning stove or an alcohol stove if I plan on cooking lunch in a place where a regular wood fire would be frowned upon. Both options add negligible weight (1.5oz-4oz).

So, in just those two items, I have like 2.25lbs of weight. I could probably cut that if I went titanium with a mug, but...C'mon. $30+ for a titanium mug? $10 for a GSI cup? If you need to fashion a lid for the GSI cup, you can use the top/bottom of a fruit can, there is a size that's just perfect and that weighs nothing.

3-Food! I'll always carry a little packet of spices, hot sauce, tea and drink mixes. Not a lot. Trail food might include jerky, nuts, sunflower seeds, dried fruit, pepperoni, etc. If I plan to have lunch... Who knows? Rice or rice noodles, smoked fish, cous cous, dehydrated veggeis, whatever. Foraging and fishing may add to the lunch?

4-Shelter?! Yeah. I like to have a tiny tarp with me when roaming for a couple reasons. I like shade and I don't like getting rained on. If I get too hot (I overheat easily), then I'll either aim for shade or make my own. I would set up a wind break or tarp when fishing as well, especially along a stream. Ideal size would be 5x7, and while you can get those made by Etowah for a certain, erm, business... I'd rather not buy from that business anymore. So, I think my next step is making my own, perhaps even out of silnylon to keep the weight down in this hiking pack (though, I prefer the heavier duty tarps for overnight, as silnylon and sparks don't mix well).

5-Cutting tool(s)! Yeah, we all carry one or two pocket knives or a multitool, but I'd also carry my fixed blade. If fishing, I might even consider a folding fillet knife. Opinel makes a great one. These aren't pack items, so much, but if I am carrying a multitool, that's always in the pack and not weighing down my pantaloons. YMMV, you might even choose a hawk, folding saw, or hatchet.

6-Forage bag! Ziplocks will do. Homemade are fun. Use them for foraging nuts, berries, and other wild edibles. Use them for packing out your trash. Use them for gathering tinder. Use them for holding fossils, indian artifacts, beach glass, shark's teeth, or feathers.

7-Fire kit! Depending on mood, this could be a lighter and a ferro rod or a full blown fire kit that has five or six ways of making fire.

8-FAK! Doesn't have to be a big first aid kit. This is where a mint tin might excel. Bandies, pills, lip balm, etc. You all know what goes in a FAK.

9-Fishing kit! I'm working on a nice handline kit, but I also have a pack rod that breaks down to about 12" for each section, add an ultralight spinning real and you have a lot for little weight. A small tackle box can be no more than a small ziploc to a film canister to a mint tin to one of those small Plano tackle containers. This is for me specifically, because I like fishing.

10-Compass! Because.. Compass!

11-Bandana! Lots of uses.

12-Cordage! Doesn't have to be a lot. For the weight, bank/trot line is pretty good and you get a lot more of it compared to paracord (which is great as we all know). I carry both. Sometimes I even carry hemp (cord, people, cord!).

13-Journal/Sketchbook! Self explanatory. I bring a pencil, usually. If I'm feeling really artsy, I'll bring a small watercolor pan and a brush.

Okay, I think those are the basics... I might be missing something and I might swap things in and out. I might add stuff depending on mood.
"My common sense is tingling..."