Author Topic: Cooking kit  (Read 22542 times)

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Offline WoodsWoman

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Cooking kit
« on: February 23, 2012, 07:47:15 PM »
I'm still trying to put one together.   I'm interested in what you folks have put together for yours.  Not so much the stove..or water containers, but eating utensils, soaps,scrubbers, cutting boards, spice containers, washcloth? , towels or whatever you haul out when its cooking time.

I'm also interested in big 'kitchens' for car camping situations. :)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Gurthy

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #1 on: February 23, 2012, 08:43:18 PM »
For utensils I like the Light My Fire Spork because it is a real fork and a real spoon. Sometimes I'll pack a cheap stainless Mora for prep.

For cleaning I use hot water and a small piece of green pad. On longer trips I'll carry Sal Suds biodegradable soap. Sand works also if there is some nearby.

A split log suffices for a cutting board.

For car camping I'll steal the utensils from the barbecue, take a larger plastic basin for washing dishes, and bring basic stuff like salt, pepper, garlic powder, etc. in small plastic bags (like crack bags).

« Last Edit: February 23, 2012, 08:46:40 PM by Gurthy »

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #2 on: February 23, 2012, 09:07:22 PM »
Ok, well... as of this writing... I have my GSI cup, it's 18 fl oz. So, if you wanted to partake in dehydrated bag cooking, you could water up your meal and have enough left over for tea or coffee. For me it's good for soup, rice, oatmeal, grits, etc. I've got a lid for it from a Bunn coffee maker thinger. I want to add four more items to this kit... I have a fork I need to make my own and put a handle on, it's something I found at a yard sale. I want to carve a nice cherry or apple wood spoon that's just the right size. I need a small pan that's light but packable. That doesn't mean it needs a folding handle, or a handle at all, but I want it to be ~6-8". It's not something I'd carry all the time, but I see lots of uses for it! Lastly, I want to carve myself a nice kuksa. :)
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2012, 10:15:44 PM »
Rog..   so you go out with just one cup?   Do you heat water for your rehydrated meal.. stir in your meal..eat and then clean and reheat water to do your drink (coffee/tea) in that same cup?  No drinking a liquid with your meal?

WW
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2012, 11:28:38 PM »
Well as it stands now, the kit is lacking a few key items - like the cup/kuksa. Let me give an example of a few things I did last year, and bear in mind these were day hike type activities and not an overnight (but you can get buy with just a cup and a water bottle overnight, imo).

I get my fire going and I get a boil on, now... There are two ways to go with this, and I've done them both ways. I could make a soup, and that covers a beverage and part of my meal, all in one cup. Or, I might just make tea. Other food is either ready to eat or can be heated over the fire on a stick or in the ashes themselves with some tinfoil... An example would be some smoked sausage, onions, and small potatoes that I carried right in my pack in some tinfoil and then fashioned a skewer out of some green wood and had kabobs.

Another option would be to just drink water or a drink mix from my water bottle while cooking a rice meal in my cup.

Lastly, many prepackaged dehydrated meals can be made and eaten from the bag, you just add water, mix it up, and let it sit for awhile to hydrate/cook. I could boil my water in the cup, pour it in the bag, and then boil more water for a hot drink while the meal is gettin' hot and squishy.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2012, 10:57:20 AM »
Thanks Rogum...    I was wondering how some guys did a meal with only one cup.   Me.. hah.. plates, full set of silveware, four pots, napkins with rings.. dessert dish...   ya know.. dinning table set up. :P

I too need to carve up a kuksa..  or the canoe cup.. I like those a little better in style.

WoodsWoman

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2012, 11:45:51 AM »
Thanks Rogum...    I was wondering how some guys did a meal with only one cup.   Me.. hah.. plates, full set of silveware, four pots, napkins with rings.. dessert dish...   ya know.. dinning table set up. :P

I too need to carve up a kuksa..  or the canoe cup.. I like those a little better in style.

WoodsWoman

   What kind of camping do you have in mind,  the campers kitchen that I carry in our modded van and the kit that I carry for pack in camps is far different.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2012, 12:00:19 PM »
Moe, both really.   I want a cook kit that will stay in the car.   That kit is for when we go fishing or metal detecting and we are outdoors all day.   I would like to just cook up a meal by the vehicle if possible.  With hubbys new meds he needs to eat something so I thought I may as well be able to just cook up a quick meal and we wont have to head for home , we can stay out doing whatever we were doing.

He also has bad circulation in his hands so having a small stove and cook kit to keep hot drinks/soups available would be nice for him to hold a warm cup for his hands.   

The other is for me to put into a daily walk type bag and eat out in the woods or fields on my walks.

WW

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Professor

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #8 on: February 24, 2012, 12:56:04 PM »
I have cooking kits of all sizes and for many types of outings.

My most recent kick has been to see just how little I can get by with, and it has come down to a 46-oz juice can with a wire bail and a SS cup with a wire handle I bought for 50 cents at a resale shop.  A one-quart Gatorade bottle for water drops inside the can, and the cup sits on the top.

The whole rig goes into a paper bag and then into a bag made from an old pantleg.  I preserved a side pocket and a hip pocket, so I can carry my spoon, fire kit, and a few tea bags.

I heat water in the can, and then mix whatever in the cup, eating and drinking "in shifts!"

I have done day trips and overnighters with this rig and it gets the job done with very light weight and low cost.  For clean-up, I rinse the cup with boiling water and wipe it out with a paper towel.  It is good until I get home to wash it up for the next trip.

I often heat the one-cup sized microwave meals of chili, beef stew,  or chicken and dumplings by dropping them in the can of boiling water, and then I can eat out of the packaged container and use the SS cup for my tea or coffee.

For solo trips, or trips where it's "every man for himself," this system works well.  It also requires a fire.  When hot weather returns, I'll likely revert to my canteen kits and alcohol stoves.
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Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #9 on: February 24, 2012, 12:59:13 PM »
The whole rig goes into a paper bag and then into a bag made from an old pantleg.  I preserved a side pocket and a hip pocket, so I can carry my spoon, fire kit, and a few tea bags.

That's friggin' brilliant!  Sew in a draw string around the top and you're good to go.  I'll have to steal your idea!
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Offline Professor

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2012, 01:05:37 PM »
The whole rig goes into a paper bag and then into a bag made from an old pantleg.  I preserved a side pocket and a hip pocket, so I can carry my spoon, fire kit, and a few tea bags.

That's friggin' brilliant!  Sew in a draw string around the top and you're good to go.  I'll have to steal your idea!

I just leave the top open.  The belt loops are a good place to attach a carrying strap and loops of cord to hang the bag from a tree when I get there.  The idea wasn't original, so I guess I stole it, too.

There's room in it for more than just the cook stuff.  Have fun!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2012, 06:48:29 PM »
Moe, both really.   I want a cook kit that will stay in the car.   That kit is for when we go fishing or metal detecting and we are outdoors all day.   I would like to just cook up a meal by the vehicle if possible.  With hubbys new meds he needs to eat something so I thought I may as well be able to just cook up a quick meal and we wont have to head for home , we can stay out doing whatever we were doing.

He also has bad circulation in his hands so having a small stove and cook kit to keep hot drinks/soups available would be nice for him to hold a warm cup for his hands.   

The other is for me to put into a daily walk type bag and eat out in the woods or fields on my walks.

WW

  I posted (I think I did anyway) in another thread on what I carry,  oh ya,  in the thread about enameled cookware, I described my pack kit and mentioned my car camping kit,  though mot in detail.
  Now I have a high top conversion van that I modded that is just the right size for my wife and I to camp in,  I'll tell you what I did to it if you're interested.
  But for now let's talk about my campers kitchen,  mine is a good size,  if you decide to try one you'll have to take into consideration the size of your vehicle,  I built the one I have in '75 when we were camping in the back of a pick up truck with a cap on the bed of the truck.  I've been using it ever since.

  It's basically a plywood box about 18" deep x 36" long x 24" high,  the front opens down and a sliding bracket on each side holds the front open to form a counter top work station,  on the inside, the left 1/3 is divided top to bottom,  this section has two horizontal shelves,  the top one is a drawer for silverware and utensils,  I lined the top of the shelf and the bottom of the drawer with formica so that it slides in and out without binding.
 Under that is another shelf that holds plates, under that goes a salad bowl, cereal bowls, pot holders, dish towels,  and my folding grill top toaster.
 The section on the right has a shelf about 1/3 of the way down that holds coffee mugs,  salt & pepper shakers, sugar bowl, other seasonings, a coffee can, tin of tea bags,  a couple of cans of condensed milk, soup mixes, a few pkgs of Ramens, and other assorted small stuff,  the bottom Right holds my cookware and coffee pot.
 The top of the box is fixed with two small brackets that holds a small two burner Coleman propane stove,  with just enough room left to sit a SS mixing bowl next to the stove,  this bowl does double duty as a wash basin and trash bowl when peeling potatoes,  onions, or for egg shells etc.
 As big as it is I'm sure I left something out,  but you have the idea.

  You can buy Campers Kitchen,  but they aren't cheap,  they're not always the right size,  and you can't  always get them in the configuration  that you'd like,  you can build one easy enough with one sheet of 1/2 plywood,  some scrap formica, a few small brass hinges,  and a closer device,  maybe under fifty bucks.
  All the tools you'd need are a good hand or power saw, hammer, screw driver,  glue, small finish nails or wood screws,  some sand paper,  stain, and poly.
  Coleman sells a folding stand for their two and three burner gas stoves, I keep one in the van under the bunk,  when the weather is nice and we spend all our time outside I put the kitchen on the stand next to the van and under the awning,  it make a great work station for food prep,  and with the stove on top you can make your morning coffee while you fix breakfast over the campfire.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #12 on: February 24, 2012, 11:33:13 PM »
Moe,  I like the sounds of that kitchen box.    That would work for me because we have a van. It sounds like something that can be set on the side in the back and pulled forward when wanting to use it.   

This box also sounds like it would work in the fish house in the winter time.  I have a three burner stove in there with a big drawer underneath it.   But nothing else for counter or work station. 

About how heavy would you say your box is when full and ready to go?

I did catch your other post and description on your cook kit.

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2012, 09:24:53 AM »
Moe,  I like the sounds of that kitchen box.    That would work for me because we have a van. It sounds like something that can be set on the side in the back and pulled forward when wanting to use it.   

This box also sounds like it would work in the fish house in the winter time.  I have a three burner stove in there with a big drawer underneath it.   But nothing else for counter or work station. 

About how heavy would you say your box is when full and ready to go?

I did catch your other post and description on your cook kit.

WW.

   How much does it weigh,  good question,  I have never actually weighed it,  but I have handles ( heavy duty drawer pulls) on mine and I have no problems moving it, but then again I'm a pretty big guy.
   Off the top of my head i'd call it at around fifty pounds,  buy I do keep my #10 dutch oven in it along with my other pots and pans,  and it is made to be portable.
   I also keep a night table that has three draws in the van for more storage and usually keep a lantern of some sort on it,  but if I'm using my three burner Coleman with the stand,  I then take the night table out of the van and put the Kitchen on that.

  My van is set up this way,  I took out the two middle seats in back of the driver/passenger seats,  I then made a bed in the rear of the van, the bed just clears the bottom of the side windows in height,  which leave me a lot of room for storage under the bed, which I can access from the rear doors or from inside the van via a couple of cabinet doors.
  On the drivers side,  between the bed and the driver seat I've placed the night table,  next to that is a small upright cabinet that I keep cleaning supplies in as well as paper towels and TP, next to that is my Campers kitchen,  then between the driver and passenger seat I keep the small portable toilet which we don't use if the campground has toilets, but it's nice to have in a pinch.
 Moving back to the passenger side,  between the rear side doors and the bed I've built another small cabinet that holds two plastic three gallon water containers.
 Our clothes are kept in the storage area over the front seats,  canned goods, other packaged foods, and our main first aid kit are stored under the bed in a narrow cabinet the full width of the van.
 Our ice chest is usually kept behind the passenger seat,  though I am thinking about buying one of those racks that fit into the trailer hitch.

 But set up the way it is we still have quite a bit of moving around room in the center of the van behind the front seats,  I also keep a small folding table under the bed in case we run into rain and have to stay in the van,  Have a high top model lets us be able to stand up in the van, and the two front seats swivel,  so we can turn them facing the back of the van, with the small table set up between the two seats we can eat, or play cards, or just share a night cap by candle light in relative comfort.

 And before you get the idea that such a rig costs big bucks,  mine though in good condition is a 1990 Ford E-150 with 80,000 miles that I bought a couple of years ago and did a few repairs to,  my total investment is about $3500.00 dollars.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #14 on: February 25, 2012, 10:26:58 AM »
I'm a big fan of the "chuck box" for car camping! Don't ask me to list the contents.  But it does contain a little note pad for writing down the ONE thing I needed, and failed to replenish!  :P

If I'm on foot, I just carry my G.I. canteen w/cup, an 8" fry pan, 1.5 liter billy, stubby spatula and a set of kinfe-fork-spoon. Also a wad of paper towels instead of a regular washcloth. Everything fits in the billy.
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2012, 10:32:55 AM »
I might have to go back and rethink the GI canteen set (with lid and the little stove from Canteen Shop). It seems like a really nice, compact kit that you can toss on your belt if need be. I would still want a pot or pan besides, but.. Yeah. Dunno! Kinda like my GSI mugs hehe.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2012, 10:41:31 AM »
I might have to go back and rethink the GI canteen set ...It seems like a really nice, compact kit that you can toss on your belt if need be. ...
My canteen lives in my pack. I usually have too much weight on my belt already, plus a gun belt. A steel canteen with a quart of water in it is not exactly 'traveling light'.
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2012, 10:53:23 AM »
Well, I would probably go with the Nalgene canteen, lol. I can't seem to find a steel one in good shape. And I don't carry a handgun, so... :)
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Offline TheOutdoorist

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2012, 12:10:12 PM »
For nights out i carry a Zebra billy can, Primus SS Frying pan, crusader mug and stainless steel nalgene water bottle.. more info http://theoutdoorist.blogspot.com/2012/02/long-term-cooking-equipment.html



Also a Millbank bag for filtration..


On days out I carry a crusader cook kit, a Timug and Ticup or a usgi cook set



More info here... http://theoutdoorist.blogspot.com/2011/12/cook-kits.html
My Blog - The Outdoorist - http://theoutdoorist.blogspot.co.uk/

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2012, 12:49:55 PM »
I might have to go back and rethink the GI canteen set (with lid and the little stove from Canteen Shop). It seems like a really nice, compact kit that you can toss on your belt if need be. I would still want a pot or pan besides, but.. Yeah. Dunno! Kinda like my GSI mugs hehe.

 I don't care much for the GI canteen,  I've tried to get used to it,  and I keep it clean and even tried a drop of bleach when rinsing it out,  but the water always has the plastic taste after a day or so,  I have picked up an aluminum one but haven't tried it yet.
 But as far as the rest,  my main cook kit is the GI mess kit and I always carry my Canteen cup with a lid that I made of aluminum sheet,  with that I have the GI canteen cup stand/stove,  I drilled four small holes in each side along the top edge,  I cut four lengths of Stainless rod the size of the holes,  these hold the cup so that it doesn't get  stuck in the stand but sits about flush with the top,  it also fits over my alcohol stove and acts like a wind screen,  and I can use it with a twig fire.
  Reversed, the cup nests into the stove,  the rods,  the alcohol stove, and two 3 oz. bottles of alcohol fits into the cup along with a folded sheet of foil and fire steel, and some paper towels, all of this fits into the canteen cover,  the canteen cover has a small pocket that holds a small bottle of water pure tablets.   
  All together it makes a pretty compact and light kit,  my water bottle is a Gyott,  but I have a couple of cheap Wally World SS bottles that have held up darned well for five bucks apiece.
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2012, 01:37:01 PM »
Yeah, I wouldn't use the GI canteen... I'd opt for the Nalgene. I've never had issue with Nalgene bottles and off tastes. Not yet, anyway. My only issue with the canteen cup is that I like to use little alchy stoves once in awhile and they seem to work better with round pots.

I have my eye on a couple different options for a cook kit... Though I'll likely stick with what I got. It works.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #21 on: February 25, 2012, 02:34:09 PM »
I don't care much for the GI canteen,  I've tried to get used to it,  and I keep it clean and even tried a drop of bleach when rinsing it out,  but the water always has the plastic taste after a day or so,  I have picked up an aluminum one but haven't tried it yet....
I think my old WWII canteen is steel, but I can't swear to it.  I had an aluminum one, but don't know where it ran off to. Can't stand the plastic ones!!!!
Once a year I sanitize the canteen with potassium metabisulfite (K-meta, a no-rinse sanitizer for beer/wine making). I find bleach is too hard to rinse out of a canteen. Then I make a strong solution of baking soda (1/4 cu in the quart canteen), and let it sit for 24 hours. The baking soda freshens it up, and removes any "musty" tastes/odors.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2012, 07:07:09 AM »
Yeah, I wouldn't use the GI canteen... I'd opt for the Nalgene. I've never had issue with Nalgene bottles and off tastes. Not yet, anyway. My only issue with the canteen cup is that I like to use little alchy stoves once in awhile and they seem to work better with round pots.

I have my eye on a couple different options for a cook kit... Though I'll likely stick with what I got. It works.

  I like to make up those little alcohol stoves,  my cat goes through two cans of Fancy Feast a day,  that's fourteen cans a week,  I just can't bring myself to throw all of them away,  so I make stove out of some of them and give them away to anyone who can use one.
  Mine seem to work well with most any cup, pot, or small fry pan,  when I make a stove I generally test it before I take it out or give it away,  my test usually consists of two cups of cold water in my GI canteen cup,  I time how long it takes to get the water to a rolling boil,  and then how long it will maintain before it goes out on two oubces of alcohol.
  I use real Denatured Alcohol,  nothing else,  time starts once the stove is primed and the cup is placed on it,  my average time for the boil is about six minutes,  total running time is usually about fifteen to eighteen minutes.
  The only thing I find with my GI cup is that on my stoves the only place that the flame doesn't fit the pot just right is the "hip" curve in the cup,  the flame will generally follow it up toward the top of the cup.
  This hasn't hampered the boiling time at all,  the only problem I find is that it gets a little bit of yellowing stain from the alcohol residue, but it cleans up ok,  oh,  and you need to make sure the butterfly handle is open,  closed they get mighty hot.
  The lid helps a lot,  before I made one I has a devil of a time trying to cook rice  (I only use real rice),  but with the lid it's a snap.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2012, 07:32:29 PM by Moe M. »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2012, 07:25:00 AM »
I don't care much for the GI canteen,  I've tried to get used to it,  and I keep it clean and even tried a drop of bleach when rinsing it out,  but the water always has the plastic taste after a day or so,  I have picked up an aluminum one but haven't tried it yet....
I think my old WWII canteen is steel, but I can't swear to it.  I had an aluminum one, but don't know where it ran off to. Can't stand the plastic ones!!!!
Once a year I sanitize the canteen with potassium metabisulfite (K-meta, a no-rinse sanitizer for beer/wine making). I find bleach is too hard to rinse out of a canteen. Then I make a strong solution of baking soda (1/4 cu in the quart canteen), and let it sit for 24 hours. The baking soda freshens it up, and removes any "musty" tastes/odors.

  How did you like the aluminum canteen ?

  I bought one a few months ago at the Army Navy store,  It's not marked, but I think it's likely made in China,  I haven't tried it out yet but look forward to doing so when the weather gets milder.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #24 on: February 26, 2012, 10:16:54 AM »

  How did you like the aluminum canteen ?

  I bought one a few months ago at the Army Navy store,  It's not marked, but I think it's likely made in China,  I haven't tried it out yet but look forward to doing so when the weather gets milder.
I liked the aluminum. It was a lot lighter. I gave it to one of the kids just for that reason.
I don't know if I'd like Chinese aluminum, but then I'm a little paranoid about their (China's) safety record with food items.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline easy_rider75

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #25 on: February 26, 2012, 11:18:54 AM »
GI set is definitely on my  toy list.  As it stands now I  am working on getting my  kitchen kit together. Stove(s) I  think I got pretty much  covered same with  something to  boil water in using  old coffee billy  cans for now. fry pan I don't have  as of yet hoping to get a small cast set. far as  eat out  and utensils I'm gonna have my  fork I use at home yep the lightweight gramweenies may cringe it is a real stainless fork little heavy  but I like stuff that is solid ya know? Cutting board  will be a hand carved one by me  same  with my spoons and such. Plates don't think I  will bother just eat from a bowl or if on my  own right  from my pot cup  gonna be a Kuksa  and a tin  cup as WW said nice to warm your hands around
?I'm not one of those complicated, mixed-up cats. I'm not looking for the secret to life.... I just go on from day to day, taking what comes.?~Frank Sinatra~

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #26 on: February 26, 2012, 01:42:55 PM »
Years ago, at REI I found a knife, fork and spoon made out of this new miracle stuff called Lexan. The stuff was good to 400F degrees, and the spoon weighed less than a round from my .357! The stuff never did break, but got lost over time.  I'm pretty sure these utensils are "industry standard" now for backpacking, and well worth picking up.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #27 on: February 26, 2012, 03:18:22 PM »
Not sure REI sells Lexan anymore... I was looking for a spoon awhile back...
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #28 on: February 26, 2012, 03:33:01 PM »
Not sure REI sells Lexan anymore... I was looking for a spoon awhile back...
Yep! They sure do!

http://www.rei.com/product/401109/rei-4-piece-lexan-utensil-set



But they are temporarily sold out on-line.
You can find a bunch of vendors on Amazon.
Here's just one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA06L05N1529&nm_mc=OTC-Froogle6&cm_mmc=OTC-Froogle6-_-SG+-+Camping+Cookware++++Utensils-_-Liberty+Mountain-_-9SIA06L05N1529
« Last Edit: February 26, 2012, 03:34:48 PM by Old Philosopher »
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #29 on: February 26, 2012, 03:34:07 PM »
Ah, well what the heck are they doing sold out?
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #30 on: February 26, 2012, 03:36:02 PM »
Ah, well what the heck are they doing sold out?
That "New Egg" outfit is selling the 4 piece set for under $8.00.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #31 on: February 26, 2012, 03:37:45 PM »
Check this out, if you're serious.

Lexan utensils on Amazon

One vendor has a 16 piece set for around $8.00
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #32 on: February 26, 2012, 04:01:48 PM »
Serious, but only about a spoon, hehe, thanks. :)
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #33 on: February 26, 2012, 08:04:04 PM »

  My vote goes to Stainless also,  I have a couple of really good three piece sets from the '70's that are clipped together with a clamp ring,  I keep one in each pack,  for cooking utensils I have a wooden spoon,  a small three tined meat fork,  and a small (as in really small) spatula made of some kind of burn proof polymer material that I got from EMS.
 
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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #34 on: February 27, 2012, 06:42:18 AM »
I use a long handle aluminum spoon (trying to find a similar length lexan one) and a cotton handkerchief. That's about it. Together with my pocket knife it is all I need. Of course, your needs will change depending on what food you eat. My food mostly requires boiling (rice, instant potatoes, etc).

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2012, 07:51:45 AM »
I use a long handle aluminum spoon (trying to find a similar length lexan one) and a cotton handkerchief. That's about it. Together with my pocket knife it is all I need. Of course, your needs will change depending on what food you eat. My food mostly requires boiling (rice, instant potatoes, etc).

  I know that going light is a prime motivator for what many folks carry in their packs,  i'm always interested in what people eat when they are packing in,  being a person who lives to eat and not one who eats to live i'm always amazed at those who eat light while packing light.
 I read a lot about guys and gals who will go out for a couple or three days, or more, with no more than a bag of granola or oatmeal and water, and eat that and drink water for three meals a day.
 A big part of my out door experience is the joy of cooking and experimenting with different ways to make tasty meals with the little kit that I carry,  for example, I can make a really good stew for two with biscuits or dumplings in my Canteen cup or "billy Pot",  now granted that means that I have to carry the 'fixings',  and take the time to prepare and cook it,  but again,  it's a part of the overall experience that I enjoy.
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #36 on: February 28, 2012, 10:20:51 AM »
I'm with you, Moe. I have all these ideas for things I want to try this year and all of it revolves around my cup, sticks, and a wood fire. Though, I do have a little grill idea I might try too. Beans, soups, breads (gluten free, of course), stews... You name it.
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Offline Professor

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #37 on: February 28, 2012, 11:13:27 AM »
I'm still trying to put one together.   I'm interested in what you folks have put together for yours.  Not so much the stove..or water containers, but eating utensils, soaps,scrubbers, cutting boards, spice containers, washcloth? , towels or whatever you haul out when its cooking time.

I'm also interested in big 'kitchens' for car camping situations. :)

WW.

Back in '78, we bought a used Dodge van and converted it for camping.  First, we built a raised bed over the wheel wells with plywood creating space underneath for our kitchen. We'd just open the back doors and we were in the "kitchen."

We had a chuck box that slid under the bed.  It had the flip down door for counter space.  The box had a silverware drawer and space for pots and pans.

We also carried a 2-burner Coleman stove that sat on a table made from a sink cut-out.  The cut-out had metal hooks on one end that attached to one of the back doors, and stood on an adjustable leg at the outer end.

The whole rig worked pretty well unless it rained or there was no shade.  We ate a lot of meals that way, because we traveled in the summer with a bluegrass band and camped out at festivals at fairgrounds and campgrounds.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2012, 11:15:44 AM by Professor »
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #38 on: February 28, 2012, 12:24:18 PM »
I too want to be a good over-the-fire cook.  :)     For many reasons.     I'm hoping soon PW or Red will make a cooking section in here so we can start sharing recipes or techniques.  And of course pictures of meals on the fire.

Professor..  did you take your cast irons with when you went out with the van?   I found a cast iron grill/griddle  the other day and I have plans for that too.   

Moe..  I'd love to hear how you make a stew out there in the woods.  That sounds like something I'd try.

WW.   
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #39 on: February 28, 2012, 02:01:01 PM »
I use a long handle aluminum spoon (trying to find a similar length lexan one) and a cotton handkerchief. That's about it. Together with my pocket knife it is all I need. Of course, your needs will change depending on what food you eat. My food mostly requires boiling (rice, instant potatoes, etc).

  I know that going light is a prime motivator for what many folks carry in their packs,  i'm always interested in what people eat when they are packing in,  being a person who lives to eat and not one who eats to live i'm always amazed at those who eat light while packing light.
 I read a lot about guys and gals who will go out for a couple or three days, or more, with no more than a bag of granola or oatmeal and water, and eat that and drink water for three meals a day.
 A big part of my out door experience is the joy of cooking and experimenting with different ways to make tasty meals with the little kit that I carry,  for example, I can make a really good stew for two with biscuits or dumplings in my Canteen cup or "billy Pot",  now granted that means that I have to carry the 'fixings',  and take the time to prepare and cook it,  but again,  it's a part of the overall experience that I enjoy.

I'm horrible when it comes to food. I mostly eat because I need the fuel. I cook as little as possible. Here is what I took on the last three day trip: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2012/02/backpacking-food-for-trip-21812-22012.html

Offline Professor

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #40 on: February 28, 2012, 05:54:16 PM »
I too want to be a good over-the-fire cook.  :)     For many reasons.     I'm hoping soon PW or Red will make a cooking section in here so we can start sharing recipes or techniques.  And of course pictures of meals on the fire.

Professor..  did you take your cast irons with when you went out with the van?   I found a cast iron grill/griddle  the other day and I have plans for that too.   

Moe..  I'd love to hear how you make a stew out there in the woods.  That sounds like something I'd try.

WW.

Yes, a 10 1/2 inch cast iron skillet was always in the van kit.  That same skillet is now hanging in the cabin on a nail, and has been in several of my videos.

I have a cast iron griddle, too!  Great for pancakes and grilled cheese sandwiches.

I think a camp cooking or woods recipe section would be great as well.
...and I'll see you soon!

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #41 on: February 28, 2012, 08:58:09 PM »
I too want to be a good over-the-fire cook.  :)     For many reasons.     I'm hoping soon PW or Red will make a cooking section in here so we can start sharing recipes or techniques.  And of course pictures of meals on the fire.

Professor..  did you take your cast irons with when you went out with the van?   I found a cast iron grill/griddle  the other day and I have plans for that too.   

Moe..  I'd love to hear how you make a stew out there in the woods.  That sounds like something I'd try.

WW.

  If you want to learn about cooking over a fire you really need to look into the Professor's video series,  good stuff.

  Stew is easy in a canteen cup or billy can,  you can use chicken, beef or hamburg, just about anything as a base.
  Lets take a beef stew, if I take raw meat with me It's frozen,  just before I leave the house the last thing I do is take my meat out of the freezer,  I wrap it in a double layer of foil (Make sure the actual meat is in a freezer bag),  and roll it up in my poncho or whatever acts as a bit of insulation,  it will last a couple of days like that before it starts to go south in warm weather.
 I carry a small seasonings kit that includes salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, garlic and onion powder, Italian seasoning, and beef or chicken bullion, and I also carry a four ounce bottle of light olive oil.
 Along with the meat and seasonings you'll need to have your veggies,  I don't do any prep at home,  when you prep (cut up or dice) stuff at home to take on the trail it gets limp or stale quicker.
 For me that's a couple of med.potatoes,  one for the stew and one for home fries for breakfast, a couple of stalks of celery, a couple of carrots, onion, and a parsnip if there a small one in the fridge.
 Also in my bag of cooking tricks is six ounce plastic bottle of rice and one with Idaho instant potatoes, and a zip-lock bag of baking mix or flour.

 OK,  lets cook, first cut your top round or sirloin strip into cubes, season your meat to taste and dust with flour or baking mix,  next heat a little olive oil in your cup, billy, or small pot and brown your meat,  when the meat is browned take it out of the pot and set it aside,  chop up half of your onion, a stalk of celery, and one carrot to about a 1/2" dice and put it all in the pot, add a little salt and pepper,  and saute in the browning oil for a couple of minutes.
 Now add water to halfway in the cup and bring to a boil then move it  off the heat and add a heaping teaspoon of beef bullion and half a teaspoon of Italian seasoning and stir, add the meat to the pot and let it slow simmer for about an hour covered (lid or aluminum foil).
 When the meat is tender add cubed potatoes and parsnip, if you need more water add it now,  bring it to a slow boil and cook until the potatoes and parsnip is fork tender, then taste to adjust seasonings,  if you like it thicker, add a table spoon of instant potato to the pot a stir until smooth, want it thicker, add more.
 If it's a bit watery tasting add a little more bullion ( I use the granulated bullion).

 PS- except for the hour it takes for the meat to cook,  it takes more time to type this recipe out than to prep this stew.
   
 These are the ingredients that I like,  you can use any combination that you like,  as for seasonings you can adjust to your taste by using other seasonings,  such a parsley or a bay leave,  or whatever.
 Served with Biscuits, bannok, or a bagget taken from home and warmed by the fire it should be a fair meal for two.
 Of course a little bigger pot would be better,  and give you leftovers for breakfast.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2012, 09:02:30 PM by Moe M. »
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2012, 11:58:32 PM »
Thats what I wanted..  a descriptive process.   Thanks.     

Ok..questions.   

What do you use for chopping and cutting on?  Do you have a cutting board with you too?
Do you make yourself a table or use your knee?
What do you do with leftovers.  Stews always seem to make 'to much'.  :)

Do you have pictures of your spice / oil / grains containers or how you pack them up?

I did make myself a 'freezer'  out of a Hersheys container.   I put frozen foods in it and pretend  I cook so many of the items a day and took them out one by one.    On the third day that last item was still frozen.  I kept the 'freezer' on the counter in 70 something temps.    Just to see if it would work. 

I wish I could watch Professor's videos.   My connection is just too slow for them.

I wish Spring would get here.. I want to get out and learn.   I'm realizing theres different catagories of 'bush/camp cooking'.    And I'd like experience in all of them.

Thank you Moe for taking the time on this topic.  Its appreciated.

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #43 on: February 29, 2012, 08:33:26 AM »
I'm still trying to put one together.   I'm interested in what you folks have put together for yours.  Not so much the stove..or water containers, but eating utensils, soaps,scrubbers, cutting boards, spice containers, washcloth? , towels or whatever you haul out when its cooking time.

I'm also interested in big 'kitchens' for car camping situations. :)

WW.

I'm in the process of transitioning from a car camping setup to a more packable setup.  The issue I think I'm most likely to run into is that I really really like to eat well at camp.  Typically Dutch oven cooking, percolator for the coffee, bacon and eggs on a cast iron griddle, etc.  Really hearty meals in other words.  I don't see myself being satisfied with heat-n-eat or boil-in-bag foods (though trail mix and dehydrated fruits are a favorite of mine).  I can get into dried soups though, I think.

So I'm trying to think through a smaller camp kitchen.  I've got a nesting mess kit with a couple pots and a frying pan, but I don't think it's as practical as I thought it would be.  The 7" fry pan is too small to cook fish (if I'm lucky enough to catch any) for 2 or 3 people.  I'll probably keep one of the pots though.

Here's the camp kitchen I'm thinking about:
  • 1 or 1 1/2 Qt. pot with lid
  • 10" Stainless skillet (modified so the handle is folding or removable)  BTW SS pans can be seasoned similar to cast iron
  • Metal pie pans (for dual duty plate/bowl)  I think they will probably be able to nest in the skillet.
  • Folding fork/spoon/knife set (they were a gift, I have yet to use them....they might be better in concept than in reality)
  • Some sort of cup that nests with my Naglene bottle, preferably with measuring capabilities
  • A small (possibly round to fit in the pie pan?) wooden cutting board
  • I've got a set of plastic travel bottles, that I could use for olive oil, Italian dressing, dishsoap, etc
  • They sell a multi-spice container in most sporting goods stores (I'll ditch the curry and cayenne and replace with herbs of some sort)
  • For utensils, I've got a mini wire wisk and a small wooden spatula that I carved.  I'll have to think about what else I need for utensils.
  • A couple Micro-fiber towels (like Sham-Wow!)
  • A small tea infuser basket for straining cowboy coffee

I'm still sort of thinking this through, however I've got most of what I need already.  I just need to figure out a way to make it all nest (as much as possible) and sew up a bag to store it in.

Thanks, WW, for bringing the subject up.  It's forcing me to really think about how I'm going to transition from a full Rubbermaid tote full of kitchen goods, to a small stuffsack with just the things I need.
« Last Edit: February 29, 2012, 08:54:15 AM by Frugal Bohemian »
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Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #44 on: February 29, 2012, 08:37:30 AM »
I did make myself a 'freezer'  out of a Hersheys container.   I put frozen foods in it and pretend  I cook so many of the items a day and took them out one by one.    On the third day that last item was still frozen.  I kept the 'freezer' on the counter in 70 something temps.    Just to see if it would work.

BTW what is this Hersheys container you're talking about?  I also need some sort of insulated, soft-sided, food storage bag.  I was thinking maybe one of those insulated lunch sacks.  This would be mainly for eggs, butter, steak, bacon, etc.  We're currently using a hard plastic Igloo Playmate cooler, but that ain't gonna fly for hiking.
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #45 on: February 29, 2012, 10:08:44 AM »
FB..    I used this container, wrapped in half inch foam and then wrapped in Duct Tape. 

 

And this is what I put in it for my trial.   I froze everything first.

1. Talapia fillet
Two packaged raw egg for scrambled eggs
1 package of chopped onion/greenpepper/spam bits ( for omelet)
2 packages of butter vaccuum sealed in icy tubes
2 packages of crisco  same as above
2 Cheddar Beddar hot dogs
1 bag of hashbrowns
1 bag of cut in half bacon strips


 

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #46 on: February 29, 2012, 10:32:38 AM »
FB..    I used this container, wrapped in half inch foam and then wrapped in Duct Tape. 

 

And this is what I put in it for my trial.   I froze everything first.

1. Talapia fillet
Two packaged raw egg for scrambled eggs
1 package of chopped onion/greenpepper/spam bits ( for omelet)
2 packages of butter vaccuum sealed in icy tubes
2 packages of crisco  same as above
2 Cheddar Beddar hot dogs
1 bag of hashbrowns
1 bag of cut in half bacon strips


 

WW.

Argh!  I can't view the pic....apparently my employer finds that site to be "Social Networking", and thus off limits?

Frustrating!
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #47 on: February 29, 2012, 10:49:27 AM »
Shoot.. 

Its a Nesquick  container. For making instant choco milk.

  The foodstuff is vaccuum packed into small sizes and those tubes from icies for kids.   I cut them in half and filled them with butters,crisco, raw egg, bbq sauces, soy sauce, peanut butter, homemade jams, mayo, sour cream, salad dressings.  I just had a blast finding things to fill and seal and freeze.  :)     

I have another idea cooking in my head.  Since this container is bulky I have a clear vinyl bag from doggy treats I'd like to do the same thing too.   With the vinyl bag it will be flat instead of hard case like the container.    AND I found some camo duct tape.  ha ha.

I'm not sure on how to get the pictures so you can see them.   

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #48 on: February 29, 2012, 10:53:52 AM »
aha.  I know what you're talking about.  Nesquick?  Like this? http://www.recyclethis.co.uk/20101011/how-can-i-reuse-or-recycle-plastic-nesquik-tubs

It's not insulated though, right?  And things stayed frozen (or at least cold enough) for 3 days?  That's pretty impressive.

I love the idea for the tubes too.  Very inventive.
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Cooking kit
« Reply #49 on: February 29, 2012, 11:04:34 AM »
Yup..thats the container.     I wrapped it in 1/2 inch foam and then wrapped the whole thing with duct tape.   Everything that went in there was frozen.     They stayed rock hard all the way to the third day out wich was the fish and crisco and the bag of hashbrowns.

With this container in mind I've frozen bratwurst pattys, hamb. pattys, sliced ham, chicken breasts ect. to fit it.   So all I have to do is grab and pack meals in.   

On the new one with the vinyl bag I want to make a pocket on the outside for the spices or dry packets. 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.