Author Topic: Backpacking stoves  (Read 12795 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Backpacking stoves
« on: October 17, 2012, 09:52:54 AM »

  I've been considering a new backpacking stove for a while now,  most of my outings lately have been day hikes and short woods wondering,  sometimes a short walk and a quick camp just to spend the day in solitude,  other times just scouting about or wetting a line.
 While i really enjoy a small camp fire it's not always the practical thing to do,  during those times i've used my DIY alcohol stove,  it's worked OK for boiling water and making Ramens or quick rice,  but it can be a pain metering out the alcohol,  getting it preheated, and the need for a suitable pot stand and wind screen is a bother at times.
 So I'm thinking that a small lightweight fuel stove might be the way to go,  there are so many of them to choose from,  and most aren't cheap,  that it's tough pickking the right one for your needs.
 I mentioned this to a friend and he recommended the one he's been using for a long time,  the MSR Pocket Rocket,  it's one of the lowest priced but better respected stoves for backpackers on the market,  so says the reviews,  so I picked one up last night and gave it a try this morning.
 I am pretty impressed with the little stove,  using it is as simple as it gets,  screw the stove body to the fuel canister, turn the adjustment knob about 3/4 turn to the left and strike a match,  and you are cooking.
 The stove is very compact,  seems to be well made,  the adjustment is full range from off to full blast and anything in between,  boil time at 60 degrees was about 2 minutes for 2 cups of cold water,  set on the lowest setting without having it go out will give you a nice slow simmer,  great for steaming rice and the like.
 I don't know how fast this thing eats through a canister of fuel yet,  but I'm told they are very efficient in that respect.
 The pros are as already stated,  plus there's no priming issues and it will burn well in most weather conditions,  and no messy fuels to spill.
 The cons as far as I can tell is you have to use the MSR fuel or Jet Boil fuel only,  and it's not designed to be a full service camp stove,  meaning it's not made to cook large meals on,  and the recommended pot or pan dia. is basically anything under eight inches.

  So there you have it,  I'd like to hear from any of you who have this or other similar backpacking stoves that care to share their views on them.
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Online madmax

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2012, 10:16:41 AM »
Pocket rocket is my go to backpacking no fire stove.  Worth the money.
"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving pretty with a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways in a cloud of smoke, thouroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, Wow! What a ride!" 
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Offline Frugal Bohemian

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2012, 10:21:19 AM »
I've recently started using one of those lightweight/screw on stoves too.  As far as I can tell, it uses any butane tank on the market.  Mine is some MSR clone I got on Amazon for under $10 (it got great reviews, so I figured I'd give it a whirl).  It packs more power than my Coleman 533 single burner, but I dislike having to worry about how much fuel I have left.  I'd like to find a reliable way to keep track of that, if anyone has any advice.  Also, I have yet to use it in the cold, but I understand the performance isn't as good in low temps.  I really like the piezo starter though (no lighter or matches involved), and the fact that it doesn't have to be pumped or primed.

As Moe stated, I find it best used for quick camp cooking (coffee, soups, etc).  I use a campfire for most cooking chores.
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Offline acara

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2012, 10:24:44 AM »
Longer trips or where I know the weather will be poor (wind/rain) .... DIY paint-can hobo

Shorter trips .. Swedish Volcano stove

I'm having good luck with the SVS & will probably retire the paint can soon. Having a stove/cup/water bottle that fit's in a 10 x 4 Maxpedition is a big weight/size saver for me (I actually use the water bottle as my "dirty water" collection container).

$11.00, plus $2.00 for a plastic/phenoliic stopper to replace the cork one that comes with it & you've got a system that can use alcohol/triox/biomass fuel & will probably outlive you.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2012, 10:36:28 AM by acara »
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Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012, 10:25:20 AM »

  I've been considering a new backpacking stove for a while now,  most of my outings lately have been day hikes and short woods wondering,  sometimes a short walk and a quick camp just to spend the day in solitude,  other times just scouting about or wetting a line.
 While i really enjoy a small camp fire it's not always the practical thing to do,  during those times i've used my DIY alcohol stove,  it's worked OK for boiling water and making Ramens or quick rice,  but it can be a pain metering out the alcohol,  getting it preheated, and the need for a suitable pot stand and wind screen is a bother at times.
 So I'm thinking that a small lightweight fuel stove might be the way to go,  there are so many of them to choose from,  and most aren't cheap,  that it's tough pickking the right one for your needs.
 I mentioned this to a friend and he recommended the one he's been using for a long time,  the MSR Pocket Rocket,  it's one of the lowest priced but better respected stoves for backpackers on the market,  so says the reviews,  so I picked one up last night and gave it a try this morning.
 I am pretty impressed with the little stove,  using it is as simple as it gets,  screw the stove body to the fuel canister, turn the adjustment knob about 3/4 turn to the left and strike a match,  and you are cooking.
 The stove is very compact,  seems to be well made,  the adjustment is full range from off to full blast and anything in between,  boil time at 60 degrees was about 2 minutes for 2 cups of cold water,  set on the lowest setting without having it go out will give you a nice slow simmer,  great for steaming rice and the like.
 I don't know how fast this thing eats through a canister of fuel yet,  but I'm told they are very efficient in that respect.
 The pros are as already stated,  plus there's no priming issues and it will burn well in most weather conditions,  and no messy fuels to spill.
 The cons as far as I can tell is you have to use the MSR fuel or Jet Boil fuel only,  and it's not designed to be a full service camp stove,  meaning it's not made to cook large meals on,  and the recommended pot or pan dia. is basically anything under eight inches.

  So there you have it,  I'd like to hear from any of you who have this or other similar backpacking stoves that care to share their views on them.

I bet it was WWwon that recommended the MSR pocket rocket.  I would have said the same.  Depending on conditions you are going to get 30-40 minutes of burn time at full on with a 100 gram canister.  More on simmer.  Also you can use any iso canister with the same connection. 

My advice is to get one of the larger 230 gram canisters  if you expect extended run times.  They last forever.

Lastly, if you have a postal scale or kitchen scale, weigh the full canister before you go out and mark the weight (A), then weigh it again after you get home (B)and mark it again.  A-B= the amount of fuel left.  That will give you a good idea of how much fuel it burns and keep you from running short in the field.
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Offline land cruiser

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 10:59:07 AM »
I use Jetboil everywhere in US because you can get gas and can't fly with it. Two cups and tea/oatmeal meal is ready in 4min. Helps in the morning. For out of the country trips, I use whatever I can get, but recently bought a converter http://www.ebay.com/itm/130655556260?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649 to ensure fuel compatibility. Haven't tried it out yet.

Offline rogumpogum

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Backpacking stoves
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2012, 12:42:41 PM »
I've typically used my Fancy Feast alcohol stove but I've loathed carrying around the fluid to fuel it. I've spilled it more than once.

Love my Emberlit but can't always have a fire. This year it was so dry here I didn't even use our backyard fireplace.

Might have to check these out. Thanks for sharing your experience!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2012, 12:56:05 PM »

I bet it was WWwon that recommended the MSR pocket rocket.  I would have said the same.  Depending on conditions you are going to get 30-40 minutes of burn time at full on with a 100 gram canister.  More on simmer.  Also you can use any iso canister with the same connection. 

My advice is to get one of the larger 230 gram canisters  if you expect extended run times.  They last forever.

Lastly, if you have a postal scale or kitchen scale, weigh the full canister before you go out and mark the weight (A), then weigh it again after you get home (B)and mark it again.  A-B= the amount of fuel left.  That will give you a good idea of how much fuel it burns and keep you from running short in the field.

  Right you are, it was Wolf that recomended the Pocket Rocket,  he's had his for a few years and it gets a lot of use on his woods bumming hikes, Kayaking, and day long fishing outings,  and he says it's worked great and been trouble free.
  With you and Max backing up his claims I feel sure that I'll be just as pleased with it as you guys have been,  I picked up a couple of 8oz, 230grm. canisters, one to use and one in reserve. and one 100grm. canister to keep in my pack in case the big one runs out on me unexpectedly.
  Thanks for the tip on weighing the fuel,  I wouldn't have thought of it until it was too late.   :)
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2012, 01:28:05 PM »
I do not use mine as an expedition stove; it is not made for that kind of work. High altitude, biting cold, rough handling etc are not what these stoves are about.   In the States I have not had a problem getting fuel; that could be an issue over seas, and flying with one of the canisters, I would assume, would be a no no.   But for weekend trips etc it has been a great stove.

The only real issue you can have is pots falling off.  Those three pot stand legs are not very wide and if the stove is not close to level the pot can slide right off.  It can be a bit of a balancing act with a kidney shaped canteen cup too.

The thinner cook pots do best on any stove.  A zebra pot or CI fry pan would waste a lot of gas, as opposed to a nice stamped SS cup or pan.  I treated myself a year ago to a titanium cook set that I reserve only for use with my stoves.  I picked them up from Campmor around Christmas on sale (discontinued model) for short money.  They look like new but have cooked more stuff than almost any of my other pans.  Stoves do not leave soot marks.

Be gentle in the handling of it.  Just screw it on the cylinder till it seals, and just turn the on off valve handle till the gas stops, no need to tighten down on stuff so much that you need pliers to get it apart, you will just damage the seals and valves that way.

A shower of ferro rod sparks will get it going too, if you misplace your lighter or matches.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2012, 01:39:24 PM »
I don't believe I'm going to be looking at any NEW stoves.  My OLD Coleman 502, Optimus 8R and Svea 123 were always good reliable cooking platforms and I will not forsake them :thumbsup:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2012, 02:09:57 PM »
I don't believe I'm going to be looking at any NEW stoves.  My OLD Coleman 502, Optimus 8R and Svea 123 were always good reliable cooking platforms and I will not forsake them :thumbsup:

  Aww,  you're just a big old softy.   :)
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Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2012, 03:49:11 PM »
You can use any threaded canister with the Pocket Rocket, not just MSR or Jetboil canisters. You can use SnowPeak, or anything which is not a GAZ connector canister (very hard to find in the US). For cold weather the MSR canisters (and SnowPeak) are much better than Jetboil.

Offline Quinn

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2012, 03:50:03 PM »
+1 on the beloved old Svea 123!
never had a problem with it.
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Offline 04man

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2012, 09:10:56 PM »
^^^^^^^
+2

Offline werewolf won

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #14 on: October 18, 2012, 06:00:05 AM »
If I were spending a week hiking back country mountain lakes to fish, or canoeing some wild river in Canada I would not be using a Pocket Rocket.  When car camping with the Grandkids, roadside picnicking with the Wife etc I still use a Coleman 2 burner or the Peak One.

Like I posted the Pocket rocket has not replaced my stoves for serious stuff.  But for day tripping, fishing and hunting locally the Rocket is simple, convenient and hard to beat.  I can be drinking my tea and heating the second cup of water for my oatmeal in the same time I?d be pumping up the old Peak One, or waiting for my 123 to stop flaring.  Plus, I do not end up smelling like a gas station attendant.  I have found my fishing success has increased many fold simply my not handling my baits with fuel smelling hands.

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Offline Professor

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2012, 06:18:06 AM »
I have always favored gasoline stoves because the fuel is so readily available.  I have a Coleman 502 and a 533 both one-burner stoves and the old stand-by 2-burner Coleman.  We used it every meal for 2 weeks in a Memphis KOA and burned car gas in it.

Canister stoves have never been high on my list because the cans have to be thrown away and you can't find the fuel everywhere.  I really started to change my mind this past summer in the Boundary Waters, though.  There, liquid gasoline wasn't available; and it would be messy, and dangerous to pack in.  The wood for fires was pretty scarce, and even if there was some, it was so hot outside that a fire was no fun to sit by.  A little propane stove would have been great!  My buddy Ryan had a butane stove, but only 1 can of fuel, so we used it sparingly and ate cold meals a lot of the time.

When I got home, I happily went back to my can of gasoline and huge supplies of hardwood for fuel, and hadn't thought much about canister stoves until this post.  There may still be one in my future!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #16 on: October 18, 2012, 08:07:01 AM »
I have always favored gasoline stoves because the fuel is so readily available.  I have a Coleman 502 and a 533 both one-burner stoves and the old stand-by 2-burner Coleman.  We used it every meal for 2 weeks in a Memphis KOA and burned car gas in it.

Canister stoves have never been high on my list because the cans have to be thrown away and you can't find the fuel everywhere.  I really started to change my mind this past summer in the Boundary Waters, though.  There, liquid gasoline wasn't available; and it would be messy, and dangerous to pack in.  The wood for fires was pretty scarce, and even if there was some, it was so hot outside that a fire was no fun to sit by.  A little propane stove would have been great!  My buddy Ryan had a butane stove, but only 1 can of fuel, so we used it sparingly and ate cold meals a lot of the time.

When I got home, I happily went back to my can of gasoline and huge supplies of hardwood for fuel, and hadn't thought much about canister stoves until this post.  There may still be one in my future!

  Good post Professor,  like you I'm partial to a campfire for most of my outdoor cooking,  and when car camping or when a fire isn't practical I haul one of my old Coleman gas stoves out from under the bunk in my van and use that.
  But I really like my little propane one burner stove ( It may have been one of the first practical backpack stoves in the early '70's when I bought it) it's nothing more than a burner perched on two folding legs and screws into a small propane cylinder.
 For making a pot of coffee or tea,  or boiling water for soup and pasta in a confined area like my camper van it's great,  it's only draw back is the size and weight of the cylinder and the eight inch legs of the stove,  it 's not suited much to a minimalist day pack.
 The little Pocket Rocket that I just picked up weighs a scant 3 ounces, and the fuel cylinder isn't any bigger than an average grapefruit,  this makes for a pretty compact and light weight set up to take the place of the little one burner propane stove for pack travel.
  While there are many more expensive stoves on the market,  this one with three fuel cylinders cost me about fifty bucks at the local Pro Bass store.

  BTW-  while I was there I happened to see a new two burner Coleman gas stove,  the sale price was just under $150.00,  my big three burner new was under fifty bucks when I bought it new,  of course the wages were much lower then also.   :)
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #17 on: October 18, 2012, 08:13:06 AM »
  BTW-  while I was there I happened to see a new two burner Coleman gas stove,  the sale price was just under $150.00,  my big three burner new was under fifty bucks when I bought it new,  of course the wages were much lower then also.   :)


Made that one WW was looking at a while back a pretty good value!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #18 on: October 18, 2012, 08:31:25 AM »
  BTW-  while I was there I happened to see a new two burner Coleman gas stove,  the sale price was just under $150.00,  my big three burner new was under fifty bucks when I bought it new,  of course the wages were much lower then also.   :)


Made that one WW was looking at a while back a pretty good value!

  You bet,  when ever I go by a yard sale,  or stop in at a "junk shop" I'm always on the look out for those old Coleman camping appliances,  and believe me they are scarce.
  I really don't need another stove, lantern, or heater,  I just love those old vintage Coleman products,  and they are already gaining in collector value,  the nice part about them is that parts are so easy to find that rebuilding them is inexpensive and easy,  and they don't usually need much in the way of rebuilding past a good cleaning anyway.
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #19 on: October 18, 2012, 08:42:09 AM »
That and the odd generator and a pump packing and you are usually good to go.  You know you have a treasure when you find one in red instead of the green paint.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2012, 09:00:17 AM »
That and the odd generator and a pump packing and you are usually good to go.  You know you have a treasure when you find one in red instead of the green paint.

  Yup,  My grandfather had one of them and I'm pretty sure it had a cooper fuel tank,  at least it was cooper colored.
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Offline AnthonyP

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #21 on: October 18, 2012, 11:53:34 AM »
Hello, I just came back from a trip and used my Pocket Rocket. I love the Stove. However the The Snow
peak seems a little bit more Stable and burns hotter. also you can get a Wind Screen for it. While I would not get now since the improvement is only slight over the Pocket Rocket if I were to do it it again I would get the Giga.

Online madmax

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #22 on: October 18, 2012, 01:28:46 PM »
Great thread Moe.  Lotsa good info and opinions on stoves and fuels.

Somebody oughta put up a "Show your stove" thread... :)
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2012, 06:55:50 AM »
Great thread Moe.  Lotsa good info and opinions on stoves and fuels.

Somebody oughta put up a "Show your stove" thread... :)

  Thanks Max,  It's funny how you get used to things you do often and take for granted those things that you don't.
  This thread points that out to me,  the stove for example,  I mostly cook everything over campfire coals,  it's handy, cheap, and who doesn't like the smell and calming effect of a fire,  I use a couple of different stoves when car camping,  or the fire rings,  but in a walk in camp it's usually the campfire,  once in a great while I might need a small stove on a day hike, so I use a catfood can alcohol stove.
  On a couple of occasions I wished I had a tiny stove that didn't need a messy fuel,  a priming dish, a piece of foil for a wind screen,  and one that didn't go out two minutes before I was done with it.
  I probably won't be using the PR any more than I did the other,  but it's nice to have when you need one and don't need to fuss with it. 
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Offline ShrekVa

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2012, 05:37:51 PM »
I have a swiss volcano stove, works well with a trangia stove inside or burning twigs, I like it alot, and theyre pretty cheap.

Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #25 on: November 30, 2012, 05:53:01 AM »
i have used this setup for many years and over many hundreds of miles
its never let me down and never runs out of fuel...woods



« Last Edit: November 30, 2012, 05:59:11 AM by woodsrunner »
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Offline Satchmo

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Backpacking stoves
« Reply #26 on: November 30, 2012, 06:57:31 AM »
We've had a lot of fire bans in the province the last couple of years because of a lack of rain.  This has led me to use the pocket rocket for most cooking.  While I like the speed for heating up water and such, the thing can be a pain in the tuckus when it's really windy.


Offline ShrekVa

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #27 on: February 10, 2013, 07:31:38 AM »
I'ld like to share that my opinion of the swiss volcanoe stove has changed, with alot of use the the stove part of the kit will begin to lose its form at the base and could possibly collapse with the the weight of a pot when its burning, i've mostly used twigs in it, and a trangia occasionally.
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Offline Draco

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #28 on: February 10, 2013, 08:27:07 AM »
I have always been a jetboil fan.  It is self contained and does not need a separate wind screen like the pocket rocket and others.  I just purchased an Esbit solid fuel stove.  It is less than 50% the weight of the jetboil and half the pack room.  I will give a side by side review at some point. 

Offline Seeker

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #29 on: February 10, 2013, 09:10:47 AM »
You can use walmart canisters with the pocket rocket.  isobutane?  something like that.  it's NOT the propane cylinders.

i love my pocket rocket.  great day-hike stove when the weather's too miserable to trust my (in)ability to make a fire in the rain (even in a twig stove) but i still want to get outside.  also great for short light solo trips (where much canoe portaging is to be expected).
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #30 on: February 11, 2013, 12:31:16 PM »
We've had a lot of fire bans in the province the last couple of years because of a lack of rain.  This has led me to use the pocket rocket for most cooking.  While I like the speed for heating up water and such, the thing can be a pain in the tuckus when it's really windy.

  Forgive the lateness of this post but I was just going over this thread,  Personally I don't like small backpacking stoves,  I like to cook over the coals of a real campfire mainly because I actually like to cook meals as opposed to boiling water for Ramens or other quicky meals.
  That said,  I used to rely a lot on my home made alcohol stove made from cat food cans,  now I carry a Pocket Rocket,  it's compact, fast, inexpensive, and it works every time,  but it's not a good cook stove,  it will usually burn anything that isn't liquid.
  Wind is a problem with all of these types of stoves,  and while some say that they use a wind screen,  they do put themselves at risk,  with a windscreen they are actually cooking over an explosive device,  don't do it.
  I don't use mine very often but it's nice to have just in case,  if you have to use it in the wind, try to set it up on the lee side of a tree to cut the wind,  if in the open you can set it up so that your body breaks the wind,  you could use your pack as a wind break as long as it's kept a foot or so away from the flame,  there are a lot of simple ways to break the wind without putting a dangerous wall around the stove.
  I like mine for soups, Ramens, Instant oatmeal, rice, and hot drinks of all kinds,  and it's great at boiling questionable drinking water,  so it's well woth having one with you.
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Offline Carbonmated

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #31 on: February 13, 2013, 08:47:02 AM »
I have been using the MSR pocket rocket since early November. Great little stove for backpacking in areas where fire bans are a continuous thing. You cannot use standard propane canisters, the MSR's are designed to use blended fuel. You do not need to use MSR fuel cans, there are several that are cheaper and provide more fuel per canister.

Be careful when buying fuel canisters, MSR uses a different thread count than most manufacturers. A local outdoor store where I got my fuel actually saved me at check out. The guy asked what stove I had, he immediately said wrong canisters! Then he explained the thread count differences.

Besides MSR brand fuel cans, I have only found 2 others that fit with proper threads.

I love mine, use it for coffee, quick boils, soup and browning up some spam ...... your dutch oven is not going to work on it, but we have fire bans all over the place year round where I am, this little stove has been great.
No, I'm not happy to see you...... it really is fatwood in my pocket.....

Offline Bearhunter

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Backpacking stoves
« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2013, 09:19:45 AM »
We've used this one for years. It works much better at high altitudes than many others on the market. We've been at high elevations with folks using MSR's and the like. They were constantly fiddling with their stoves, while we just cooked our meal and ate while they were still trying to get their stove to work :shrug:

http://www.coleman.com/product/sportster-ii-dual-fuel-1-burner-stove/3000000792?contextCategory=2005#.URu8aSi9Kc0
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #33 on: February 13, 2013, 10:02:53 AM »
We've used this one for years. It works much better at high altitudes than many others on the market. We've been at high elevations with folks using MSR's and the like. They were constantly fiddling with their stoves, while we just cooked our meal and ate while they were still trying to get their stove to work :shrug:

http://www.coleman.com/product/sportster-ii-dual-fuel-1-burner-stove/3000000792?contextCategory=2005#.URu8aSi9Kc0

When the old (502?) Sportster, with the bigger green tank first came out YEARS ago, I bought one in 1971 for a trip to the Black Hills and Yellowstone NP.  It was our ONLY stove for several years, and for trips into the BWCAW when fire bans were in place during dry periods.  I used it to melt lead in an old cast iron Lyman lead pot when casting balls for my muzzleloaders, for decades.  The ONLY complaint I've ever heard about them from anyone, is that they're too heavy.....but, I am, too ???   So, we both continue to plug along as the years pass, with few complaints O:-). They're great stoves and apparently, work forever :)
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Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Bearhunter

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Backpacking stoves
« Reply #34 on: February 13, 2013, 10:19:43 AM »
Yeah they are good stoves. We're not 'ultra light' backpackers anyway.
I mean heck, we've carried our fishing gear, belly boat, pump, flippers, and waders many a miles to high elevation mountain lakes without thinking twice about it ;)

Besides... I don't have to worry about the weight of the stove anyway.
My wife always carries it :P
Don't wait until it's too late to live your dream!

Offline bigwolf

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2013, 09:09:24 PM »
I will start by saying I do not own one of these. I saw it on a different forum earlier today and thought it was an interesting piece of technology. Would I ever get one? It would be nice to have for trips with my wife. She likes her gadgets and it would make her happy to be able to charge them up while we were out there.

http://www.biolitestove.com/campstove/camp-overview/features/

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #36 on: February 13, 2013, 09:40:53 PM »
A lot of my early camping and climbing was at or above timberline so I bought a Optimus 8R stove and a little pump that got it going quickly.  I have used it since 1971 I think and, with a few parts replaced over the years, its still a great stove.  I buy old ones at flea markets or yard sales if I see them just in case I need more parts.  They are great stoves, burn white gas, and perform well at all altitudes and in all weather.  A bit heavy compared to the MSR stoves but, for me, the only way to go.

If I can drive to the camp site and fires are not allowed then my old Coleman two burner does the job.

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Offline wolfy

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #37 on: February 13, 2013, 09:48:34 PM »
I've got an 8-R, too, Stan....I kind of like the innards all being folded up in the box for travel and it seems a little more stable than the 123 :P
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #38 on: February 14, 2013, 02:41:41 PM »
I noticed that Wolfy.  You and I sure have a lot in common when it comes to picking gear.  :) 

What I have always like about the stove is how easy it is to get started when you have that little pump.  When its cold and your in need of a hot drink fasty that stove is a great way to shorten the time.  It will boil water really fast and runs for quite a long time on one tank of fuel.   Its also easy to use inside a tent.  Parts used to be easy to get but I noticed last year that most of the places that had parts are either out of business or out of parts.

I also have a Optimus 80, the old brass thing in the blue and red can.  I got it a little before the 123.  It is a great stove, uses a little pump, and is less weight (I think) than the 8R. 
alas, parts are hard to find for it too.  :-[ 
« Last Edit: February 14, 2013, 02:46:50 PM by wsdstan »
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #39 on: February 14, 2013, 02:56:55 PM »
I guess these dependable old stoves are becoming antiques right along with their stalwart owners, Stan >:(
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #40 on: February 14, 2013, 03:38:10 PM »
I guess these dependable old stoves are becoming antiques right along with their stalwart owners, Stan >:(

Boy Howdy!

You want a thrill?  Go on the bay and see what these are bringing.  Jeez, maybe our retirement is saved.  :P
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline wgiles

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Re: Backpacking stoves
« Reply #41 on: February 14, 2013, 05:34:59 PM »
My stove for years was an Optimus 99 and it still is a good stove. I wanted something to take hunting that I could use to make coffee so I got a jetboil with the coffee press and an extra pot. I've been happy with it and I can also use it for minimalist meals. MSR's Micro Rocket might be a good choice.