Author Topic: Wilderness Survival Skills Books  (Read 9569 times)

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Offline JTD

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Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« on: December 19, 2012, 04:36:35 PM »
Which do you own, recommend, and why? 


Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2012, 04:47:24 PM »
Which do you own, recommend, and why?
I entered some comments here on Tawrell's book. I think it's worth adding to anyone's library.

http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,4034.msg70021.html#msg70021

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Offline Draco

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2012, 04:59:20 PM »
Best Bushcraft book is by MorsKochanski it is factual and well illustrated.  It lacks any personal stories.  That makes it a dry read but the information is very good and accurate.   

Best survival books in no particular order are:

Cody Lundin 98.6.  It is full of good information and a humorous writing style make this a good book. The pictures are well shot and the illustrations are very clear.  Not your typical rehash of the Air Force Survival Manual.     

Less Stroud Survive!  Good information and again not just a rehash of dated material.  Les' book is full of personal stories and accounts of his experiences.  Les is also willing to break some of the old rules by introducing his common sense style.

Air Force Survival Manual.  Yes it is dated and a dry read but is full of good information.  I highly suggest it.

SAS Survival Handbook.  About the same as the Air Force one but a little more up to date. 

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2012, 05:25:13 PM »
I've got quite a few so I may add them as I go.

If I could only take one book I guess it would be the United States Air Force Search and Rescue Survival Training book now called the USAF Survival Handbook because it is chock full of good info.

As far as Wilderness Survival books I have and really like the Ultimate Guide To Wilderness Living by John & Geri McPherson because they know their stuff and keep it simple and easy to follow.

If you were serious about Wilderness Survival I would also get both books by Samuel Thayer on edible wild plants. The Forager's Harvest and Nature's Garden. The other wild edible book I highly recommend is Edible Wild Plants by John Kallas. These books are probably all you need to be able to feed yourself veggie wise in most places.

"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline land cruiser

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2012, 05:31:53 PM »
Mors's book.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 06:51:17 PM »
I just read Cody Lundin's "98.6" courtesy of Gurthy's 'pass-around' and agree with Draco that is well worth paying attention to.  Barbarossa Bushman's recommendation of John & Geri McPherson's books is also VERY good!  They are nearly ideal for good solid no-nonsense information for my part of the world.....not a true desert, YET ??? and full of information for using our region's plants and critters for food, shelter and clothing!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 06:53:42 PM »
"Outdoor Survival Skills" Larry Dean Olsen (c1967).
Good luck finding a copy outside an old book store.

Ed:
I'll be dipped! It's still available. This 1971 edition has 20 more pages than my 1967 edition.

http://www.amazon.com/Outdoor-Survival-Skills-Larry-Olsen/dp/1556523238/ref=la_B000APEUIS_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1355968386&sr=1-1

Amazon says only 15 copies left. (Don't let the Robert Redford thing scare you. He only wrote a preface to the book)
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2012, 06:57:53 PM »
I think that was the first "survival" manual I ever owned, Ol' P, outside of the Boy Scout's Handbook for Boys.......which should be a good basic introduction for skills for anyone just getting into it, also!
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2012, 07:09:12 PM »
I think that was the first "survival" manual I ever owned, Ol' P, outside of the Boy Scout's Handbook for Boys.......which should be a good basic introduction for skills for anyone just getting into it, also!
It IS the first book on the subject I ever bought, and I pulled it off the shelf to get the title right.
(Apparently my wife is right. I never throw anything away.  :P )
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2012, 07:14:18 PM »
I think that was the first "survival" manual I ever owned, Ol' P, outside of the Boy Scout's Handbook for Boys.......which should be a good basic introduction for skills for anyone just getting into it, also!
It IS the first book on the subject I ever bought, and I pulled it off the shelf to get the title right.
(Apparently my wife is right. I never throw anything away.  :P )

Exact words I've heard echoing here, but our old age proves that it pays off....We SURVIVED :cheers:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #10 on: December 19, 2012, 07:19:55 PM »
I think that was the first "survival" manual I ever owned, Ol' P, outside of the Boy Scout's Handbook for Boys.......which should be a good basic introduction for skills for anyone just getting into it, also!
It IS the first book on the subject I ever bought, and I pulled it off the shelf to get the title right.
(Apparently my wife is right. I never throw anything away.  :P )

Exact words I've heard echoing here, but our old age proves that it pays off....We SURVIVED :cheers:
I'm glad I taught my kids and wife to keep things around that just might prove useful some day. I'd have been on the compost heap long ago, otherwise.  :-\ :P
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline RBM

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #11 on: December 19, 2012, 07:39:50 PM »
Which do you own, recommend, and why?

  • Primitive Wilderness Living & Survival Skills or Ultimate Guide To Wilderness Living by John & Geri McPherson
  • Surviving The Wilds Of Florida by Reid F. Tillery
  • Field Guide to Wilderness Survival by Tom Brown Jr.
  • Primitive Wilderness Skills, Applied & Advanced by John & Geri McPherson
  • Edible Wild Plants (Eastern/Central North America) - Peterson Field Guides
  • Eastern/Central Medicinal Plants and Herbs - Peterson Field Guides

A good range of both primitive and practical skills books in the order of importance to me. The last two are for reference only as there are usually many varieties of one kind of plant and learning local varieties takes a "whole" lot more including time spent hands on over all the seasons of change and using some type of wild plant authority for positive identification and verification. There are no short cuts to learning wild plants. I leave it alone if I don't know what it is.

I will add Larry Dean Olsen's Outdoor Survival Skills. Almost forgot that one. Others I consider worth the read are the SAS Survival Guide by John Wiseman, Bushcraft by Mors Kochanski, and Survive! by Les Stroud. The US Army Survival Manual is also worth the read if you can get through all of it. ;D I would only suggest the old BSA Handbooks of the '50s or '60s or before that still have outdoor camp craft skills in them.
Robert

Offline Gurthy

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2012, 04:45:29 PM »
To those already mentioned I'd add two from Ray Mears: Essential Bushcraft and Outdoor Survival Handbook. Both are pretty general yet fairly comprehensive books.

I've never failed to learn something from every "survival" book I've read, but some are definitely better than others. One that I wouldn't recommend is Six Ways In And Twelve Ways Out. Unless you're in the military and need a SERE-type training manual you should pass on that one.


I like to return to these types of books every now and again to keep topics fresh... they make great bathroom reading material :)

Offline RBM

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2012, 05:08:24 PM »
I only have one book of Mears to draw from, Outdoor Survival Handbook (older book). I hope the newer Essential Bushcraft is better. OSH jumps around from topic to topic too much and revisiting previous topics. The information in it is good but I just wasn't very impressed with it maybe due to the way it was formatted or put together (seemed kind of haphazard) by chapters making it hard to follow. Not taking anything away from the content itself, just the way it was put together (assembled).
Robert

Offline Draco

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2012, 05:34:28 PM »
I have Mears Essential Bushcraft as well.  I would recommend the Mors Kochanski book before Mears.

Offline JTD

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2012, 09:05:34 PM »
Thanks for the input..

So far I've seen alot of the books I dig:



But I'm always looking for new data!

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2012, 09:29:08 PM »
Thanks for the input..

So far I've seen alot of the books I dig:


But I'm always looking for new data!
Ha, ha! There's my man Tawrell's tome.  :thumbsup: Not exactly a pocket guide.  ;)

So now that you have a collection of "how to" books, how about a "how not to" book?
There are not many illustrations, and a few disturbing photos, but the book deals with real life misadventures, and how the participants either survived, or didn't.  Some good lessons to be learned, and some solid tips on everything from survival at sea, to being in a plane crash.

"The Art of Survival" by Cord Christian Troebst, translated from German by Oliver Coburn (c1964).

Heck, it would appear Amazon has just about anything....

http://www.amazon.com/ART-SURVIVAL-Cord-Christian-Troebst/dp/B000GTG6Y4/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1356064007&sr=1-2&keywords=the+art+of+survival

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Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2012, 09:18:04 PM »
I think this book is by far the best that I have read.  I find the techniques easily followed and the illustrations are great.  I did a pass-a-round and you can ask the guys who read it how they liked it.  Here is the link.  http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,1419.msg23667.html#msg23667

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Offline Gurthy

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2012, 08:33:08 AM »
I think this book is by far the best that I have read.  I find the techniques easily followed and the illustrations are great.  I did a pass-a-round and you can ask the guys who read it how they liked it.  Here is the link.  http://bladesandbushcraft.com/index.php/topic,1419.msg23667.html#msg23667

Yep...good book! It's more than just a "survival" book IMO, as is the Mors book and some from Mears. Sometimes a general knowledge of "bushcraft" can avoid a "survival" situation ;)

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #19 on: December 28, 2012, 07:54:31 PM »
While not technically a "survival manual" this book is an incredible resource for travelling in the mountains. It covers everything from gear selection, clothing, footwear, to technical ice climbing, rope rescue and glacier travel. It also discusses campsite selection, navigation, trip planning, high altitude health concerns, climbing knots and anchors, expedition planning, 1st aid, etc. Really, truly an awesome book. I loaned my copy out and it never came back so I bought it again. It's that good.

Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills 50th anniversary edition

Offline Bearhunter

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Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #20 on: December 28, 2012, 08:15:31 PM »
While not technically a "survival manual" this book is an incredible resource for travelling in the mountains. It covers everything from gear selection, clothing, footwear, to technical ice climbing, rope rescue and glacier travel. It also discusses campsite selection, navigation, trip planning, high altitude health concerns, climbing knots and anchors, expedition planning, 1st aid, etc. Really, truly an awesome book. I loaned my copy out and it never came back so I bought it again. It's that good.

Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills 50th anniversary edition
That's funny that you posted this PW :D
My F-in-L gave me a copy of that book for Christmas along with the altimeter that I posted about the other day.
It's the hardback 1966 5th printing edition in perfect shape.
He said that it was his textbook for...

"Mountain Climbing Class, summer 1967"
At the University of Washington
Cool stuff ;)

I haven't started reading it yet though.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #21 on: December 28, 2012, 08:42:39 PM »
I had an earlier edition the first time around, and havent had a chance to dig into the 50th anniversary one yet. But it is definitely a good read and the skills and techniques described will make things easier on any outdoorsmen, not just climbers.

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #22 on: December 28, 2012, 09:09:15 PM »
I have Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills Seventh Edition, the one before the 50th Anniversary edition. I wonder if they are much different?  :shrug: Any new information worth getting it?

Here is an awesome book that I forgot to put on before. Actually it is one of my favorite and easily in the top five. All I can say is it is "chock full" of information and even though the flora and fauna in the book are all native to Cali, it is by no means limited to California and the skills applied with other material. This is some of the most comprehensive info I have found.

Survival Skills of Native California by Paul D. Campbell ISBN 0-87905-921-4

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/survival-skills-of-native-california-paul-d-campbell/1104797829?ean=9780879059217
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Offline RBM

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2012, 09:18:12 PM »

Here is an awesome book that I forgot to put on before. Actually it is one of my favorite and easily in the top five. All I can say is it is "chock full" of information and even though the flora and fauna in the book are all native to Cali, it is by no means limited to California and the skills applied with other material. This is some of the most comprehensive info I have found.

Survival Skills of Native California by Paul D. Campbell ISBN 0-87905-921-4

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/survival-skills-of-native-california-paul-d-campbell/1104797829?ean=9780879059217

Now this one would have been good to post in the "Local survival books where you live?" thread. :thumbsup:
Robert

Offline DomC

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #24 on: July 22, 2013, 02:18:08 PM »
This is my entire library:
1. Basic Safe Travel and Boreal Survival Handbook- M. Kochanski (Kindle E-Book).
2. Bushcraft The Ulitimate Guide to Survival in The Wilderness- Richard Graves (Kindle E-Book).
3. Survivability for the Common Man- Dave Canterbury (Kindle E-Book).
4. Woodcraft A Guide to Camping And Survival- E.H. Kreps (Kindle E-Book).
5. The Green Beret's Compass Course- SGT Don Paul (Kindle E-Book).
6. Woodcraft & Camping- G.W. Sears (Kindle E-Book)
7. Land Navigation, SERE, SCRS 1201 Military Manuals, Survival E-Books- (Kindle E-Book).
8. Bug Out Bag- Robert Reinoehl (Kindle E-Book).
9. Survival Gear You Can Live With- Tony Nester (Kindle E-Book).
10. 98.6 Degrees: The Art of keeping Your Ass Alive- Cody Lundin (Paperback).
11. Stay Alive Survival Skills You Need- John D. McCann (Paperback).
12. SAS Survival Guide For Any Climate, For Any Situation- John "Lofty" Wiseman (Paperback).
13. Special Forces Survival Guide: Wilderness Survival Skills from the World's Most Elite Military Units - Chris McNab (Hardcover).

DomC :) ;)
 
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Offline xj35s

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #25 on: July 22, 2013, 03:26:50 PM »
Nessmuk " woodcraft and Camping.

"How to stay alive in the woods" By Bradford angier

I think everyone should read "The ultimate hang" by Derek Hansen. It's a quick fun read. great info on hammock camping.
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Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Wilderness Survival Skills Books
« Reply #26 on: July 22, 2013, 03:36:02 PM »
While not technically a "survival manual" this book is an incredible resource for travelling in the mountains. It covers everything from gear selection, clothing, footwear, to technical ice climbing, rope rescue and glacier travel. It also discusses campsite selection, navigation, trip planning, high altitude health concerns, climbing knots and anchors, expedition planning, 1st aid, etc. Really, truly an awesome book. I loaned my copy out and it never came back so I bought it again. It's that good.

Mountaineering: Freedom of the Hills 50th anniversary edition

+1 Not a survival book, but a must read.