Author Topic: Usefulness of fire lays or styles  (Read 3063 times)

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Offline RedBeard

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Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« on: December 29, 2012, 10:03:59 PM »
So I have been trying to look up the different effective uses of different fire lays; ex. Dakota Fire - concealed cooking, Trench Fire - cooking in high wind, pyramid fire - no maintenance fire, etc. I have been unsuccessful so far in finding a comprehensive list that gives both the different styles and there respective uses. I kind of want a place where I can find it all in one because I am trying to write a personal bushcraft/survival manual that both pertains to the regions where I would be and the knowledge I would need to reference and it is just a bit easier if I don't have to jump between like 19 different websites and 4 or 5 different books to write the information down. Maybe somebody knows of a web link or a hard copy reference I could use it would be awesome.
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Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #1 on: December 29, 2012, 10:18:24 PM »
you might be the first one putting that list together friend.  Sounds interesting though.  I really like trench fires.  Especially in the summer and for cooking.  They work great.  Wish I had the answer you were looking for, unfortunately I can just wish you luck in your search. 

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Offline RedBeard

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #2 on: December 29, 2012, 11:42:51 PM »
I have 11 so far and its growing. Just guess its just gonna take the footwork (or finger work) to get a solid list I suppose. If I can't find a comprehesive list I will definitely post it when I'm finished.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #3 on: December 30, 2012, 12:22:38 AM »
I have 11 so far and its growing. Just guess its just gonna take the footwork (or finger work) to get a solid list I suppose. If I can't find a comprehesive list I will definitely post it when I'm finished.
Here's one to add to your list, if it's not already there.

http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/survival/fire/basics/jlscoutfire.html
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Offline RBM

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2012, 12:56:34 PM »
So I have been trying to look up the different effective uses of different fire lays; ex. Dakota Fire - concealed cooking, Trench Fire - cooking in high wind, pyramid fire - no maintenance fire, etc. I have been unsuccessful so far in finding a comprehensive list that gives both the different styles and there respective uses. I kind of want a place where I can find it all in one because I am trying to write a personal bushcraft/survival manual that both pertains to the regions where I would be and the knowledge I would need to reference and it is just a bit easier if I don't have to jump between like 19 different websites and 4 or 5 different books to write the information down. Maybe somebody knows of a web link or a hard copy reference I could use it would be awesome.

I have never seen a "comprehensive" (all inclusive) fire building methods source....yet. I did the normal web search also and mostly scattered methods here and there. I have plenty of books that cover most all of them though. Each has its own reason of usage depending on the situation. There are a "whole" lot of them and that is probably why there is no comprehensive source.

Semantics I guess. To me a fire lay is how the fire is laid out within a build such as teepee, log cabin, pyramid, etc. A fire build is how the fireplace is constructed or structured such as a Dakota fire pit, trench fire, keyhole fire, etc. I think you're referring to fire builds by the fire types you have listed. I think of a fire build as "where" the fire is going to be (fireplace) and the fire lay as how its put together if that makes any sense.  :shrug:
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 02:33:27 PM by RBM »
Robert

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2012, 01:16:08 PM »
So I have been trying to look up the different effective uses of different fire lays; ex. Dakota Fire - concealed cooking, Trench Fire - cooking in high wind, pyramid fire - no maintenance fire, etc. I have been unsuccessful so far in finding a comprehensive list that gives both the different styles and there respective uses. I kind of want a place where I can find it all in one because I am trying to write a personal bushcraft/survival manual that both pertains to the regions where I would be and the knowledge I would need to reference and it is just a bit easier if I don't have to jump between like 19 different websites and 4 or 5 different books to write the information down. Maybe somebody knows of a web link or a hard copy reference I could use it would be awesome.

I have never seen a "comprehensive" (all inclusive) fire building methods source....yet. I did the normal web search also and mostly scattered methods here and there. I have plenty of books that cover most all of them though. Each has its own reason of usage depending on the situation. There are a "whole" lot of them and that is probably why there is no comprehensive source.

Semantics I guess. To me a fire lay is how the fire is layed out within a build such as teepee, log cabin, pyramid, etc. A fire build is how the fireplace is constructed or structured such as a Dakota fire pit, trench fire, keyhole fire, etc. I think you're referring to fire builds by the fire types you have listed. I think of a fire build as "where" the fire is going to be (fireplace) and the fire lay as how its put together if that makes any sense.  :shrug:
Good point, and distinction!
You can BUILD a Dakota fire pit, and then LAY a log cabin (or teepee) fire in it.  You can BUILD a trench, then LAY any type of wood configuration in it you want.
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Offline RedBeard

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2012, 02:21:37 PM »
I guess I'm looking for both builds and lays then. Perhaps once I gets it all researched out I might have to post a new thread with all of them written up so the next guy who wants something similar can find it all together. It should be fun once I get to the part where I start trying all of them to see how well they work for the intended purpose.
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Offline RBM

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2012, 02:22:12 PM »
I guess my most used method is an above ground fireplace. A cleared out area with dirt built up both as a base and a berm all the way around in a circle with the fire lay inside. I often lay green sticks down for a base inside (added ground protection from moisture) for the fire lay on top. We have no rocks here for a circle fireplace unless man-made found blocks. I would only use a "fire pit" dug into the ground for concealment purposes and then be very careful about layering dirt over any underground roots to protect them. Underground roots can catch fire and you can get what they call a "muck fire" that can burn underground for years. That is just as much of a concern as an inadvertent above ground wildfire. So I try to be very careful to steer clear of tree roots setting up a fireplace when possible whether above ground or below.

Some muck fires are naturally occurring from natural compost. Others are not natural.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_muck_fires
« Last Edit: December 30, 2012, 02:43:48 PM by RBM »
Robert

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2012, 08:15:37 PM »
.... be very careful about layering dirt over any underground roots to protect them. Underground roots can catch fire and you can get what they call a "muck fire" that can burn underground for years. That is just as much of a concern as an inadvertent above ground wildfire. So I try to be very careful to steer clear of tree roots setting up a fireplace when possible whether above ground or below....
We spent an afternoon once in Alaska putting out a fire in the natural peat soil. The campfire had been drowned with water a couple days earlier, but the roots carried the fire to a young fir tree. We came across this flaming bush in our travels, and it took a bit to figure out what had happened. We had to trench all the way back to the fire pit, about 30 feet, to make sure we got everything dowsed that was smoldering.
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Offline BigHat

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Re: Usefulness of fire lays or styles
« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2012, 02:43:04 PM »
.... be very careful about layering dirt over any underground roots to protect them. Underground roots can catch fire and you can get what they call a "muck fire" that can burn underground for years. That is just as much of a concern as an inadvertent above ground wildfire. So I try to be very careful to steer clear of tree roots setting up a fireplace when possible whether above ground or below....
We spent an afternoon once in Alaska putting out a fire in the natural peat soil. The campfire had been drowned with water a couple days earlier, but the roots carried the fire to a young fir tree. We came across this flaming bush in our travels, and it took a bit to figure out what had happened. We had to trench all the way back to the fire pit, about 30 feet, to make sure we got everything dowsed that was smoldering.

same thing raged here in southern VA, northern NC earlier this year in the great dismal swamp. burned for months and forced a lot more black bears and coyotes up near my area.
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