Author Topic: Anorak  (Read 16197 times)

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Offline land cruiser

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Anorak
« on: January 28, 2013, 09:10:14 PM »
This isn't really a review, just thought I would share with you guys my recent experience with Swazi clothing. I stopped by their booth at the convention and tried a few things on. All were well made with great attention to detail, I especially liked their Tahr Anorak. My only grudge with it came from the fact that it doesn't have pockets, but there is a full zip jacket same length and made from the same material that has those pockets.

Supposedly the new Aegis material is windproof and waterproof. Very comfortable to wear and I like the design of their hood (has a little wire in it). Front pocket will hold a shell on the side.

I'll probably end up buying one just because:) And will keep it in my truck for emergencies. They were all sold out at the show, even floor samples.
http://www.swazi.co.nz/Online-Shop/Wet-Weather-Gear/Tahr-Anorak/

Offline kanukkarhu

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Anorak
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2013, 09:34:02 PM »
Holy moley! That's a LOT of bones for a coat...

Must be nice, though, eh?


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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2013, 11:01:22 PM »
That is a high priced coat at $457 USD.  Must be selling well as they are still sold out on their website as well.  They appear to be, as you note, very well made.  However, I think if your going to go with a waterproof anorak or parka, there are a lot of fine choices and many for a lot less money.   

Historically if its going to be wet my outer garment of choice has been either a Barbour waxed cotton hooded coat or a gore-tex layer heavy duty nylon coat.  It can be an anorak or a parka as, to me, it doesn't matter if it isn't severe cold.  If it is used in extreme cold then I want a breathable material such as canvas. 

Thanks for posting this item, that company makes some interesting clothing.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2013, 01:31:50 AM »
I have always been intrigued by anorak but never bought one because there is no zipper. Is there an advantage to the design that outweighs the convenience of a zipper?

Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2013, 06:19:37 AM »
I would love to see a side by side comparison of this fabric with current generation goretex to see how the performance  compares both with water resistance, breathability, abrasion resistance and durability by an independent lab like Consumer Reports.

Interesting.
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2013, 06:44:37 AM »
i recently purchased an anorak made by duluth pack and although its not waterproof, it is water resistant and has worked out great for trekking in cold temps...as an outer garment anoraks are tough to beat.
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2013, 06:54:29 AM »
If I was not allergic to wool I would be all over one of those Borial shirts Empire sells.  At only a couple of hundred bucks it seems to have the features of this coat.
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2013, 07:16:34 AM »
If I was not allergic to wool I would be all over one of those Borial shirts Empire sells.  At only a couple of hundred bucks it seems to have the features of this coat.
OH yeah!...thems nice...wish list for next christmas...woods
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Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2013, 07:27:02 AM »
If I was not allergic to wool I would be all over one of those Borial shirts Empire sells.  At only a couple of hundred bucks it seems to have the features of this coat.
OH yeah!...thems nice...wish list for next christmas...woods

I have one, really nice garment.  It just has not been cold enough this winter to wear it around here.

LC, sorry for the hijack.
Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved? One should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, it is much safer to be feared than loved.

Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2013, 08:02:56 AM »
about the only problem i see with any "waterproof" garment...thier great for sitting in a duck blind or on a deer stand, but for hiking or working in, thier going to make you sweat big time.
even goretex with its supposed breathability has this same effect on me personally...though i really like my usgi gortex parka...hey beast is goretex really waterproof or just water resistant?...woods 
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Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2013, 08:22:26 AM »
about the only problem i see with any "waterproof" garment...thier great for sitting in a duck blind or on a deer stand, but for hiking or working in, thier going to make you sweat big time.
even goretex with its supposed breathability has this same effect on me personally...though i really like my usgi gortex parka...hey beast is goretex really waterproof or just water resistant?...woods

goretex is water resistant.  It has a semipermeable membrane that allows water molecules to exit the fabric in the form of vapor but not enter. 

It works pretty well but there is certainly room for improvement.  it would be cool if this aegis fabric is the next step.  A fabric called eVent is also well reviewed as the sucessor to goretex but I don't have any first hand experience with it. 
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2013, 08:31:14 AM »
I am sorry LC I looked quickly at the link and mistakenly thought that was a wool anorak like the Borial.  My Bad.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2013, 09:57:45 AM »
i recently purchased an anorak made by duluth pack and although its not waterproof, it is water resistant and has worked out great for trekking in cold temps...as an outer garment anoraks are tough to beat.


I have always thought that the anorak would make an ideal outer 'shell' type of garment, but have held back on buying one.  My fear has always been overheating with the resultant moisture from within being the bigger worry than the complete water repellant benefit of goretex or anything resembling it. 

The design always brought to mind the outer garments utilized by the Inuits and other peoples of the far North.  If it works for THEM, it should work elsewhere, but only if one can keep the perspiration problem under control or ventilate it in some way.  I suppose shedding it completely would be the safest route, but I continue to ponder the benefits/problems.   I'm a firm believer in layering, so that should work well in my situation.

Woods, I like this one best of the many I've seen so far, for my use.......loose enough to 'pump' some air through it when needed, water resistant, but windproof enough to make the design work in winter on the 'Big Open' of the mixed-grass prairie of the Northern Great Plains.   I'm checking this one out......it deserves closer scrutiny :thumbsup:
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2013, 02:40:24 PM »
Anoraks don't have zippers to prevent heat loss where the zipper is located.  The real reason though is the original developers of the garment didn't have the concept of a zipper.  My canvas anoraks work well, let most if not all of the moisture out through the material and by opening the neck a bit.  My favorite extreme cold outer garment is the same as a Anorak but it has a zipper and flap so it is a parka.  Mine is made by Empire Canvas and Wool.  Empire also makes a great Anorak in canvas for those who prefer the traditional style.  Parka or Anorak, both made of canvas and using a coyote fur ruff, are garments well suited to be used as an outer layer in extreme cold.

If its wet I use a waxed cotton coat or gore-tex parka.  My Filson shelter cloth coat works well in the wet when layered over a sweater and wool shirt.  It breathes pretty well but not as well as the untreated canvas.

Another inexpensive and very effective Anorak is the Swedish army model that can be found from time to time on line.  Its also available as a parka.  They are light, easy to get on and off, and dry fairly quickly. 

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Offline wolfy

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2013, 03:31:49 PM »
Thanks, Stan, I'll look at Empire, also...........I always liked capotes too, but thinking a sash will hold them where you want them is folly, at best 8)
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2013, 03:55:48 PM »
Meanwhile, woodsrunner is still the best dressed lot of us bushcrafters...   :P
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Offline land cruiser

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2013, 04:09:44 PM »
I am with Dan, I got exposed to anoraks when travelling in the far north, most indigenous cultures make use of this garment. They also make knives out of scissors, both are out of necessity:)

Offline Bearhunter

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Anorak
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2013, 04:14:53 PM »
I've got one of those surplus Swedish military anoraks. It was white, but I dyed it OD green.
I've thought about waterproofing it, but haven't done it yet.

http://shop.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/cb.aspx?a=713513&SID=1lt0y0n6lask2&cjaffsite=VigLink&utm_medium=CJ&CJ=1&cjaffilid=6147686&utm_campaign=SPG+Product+Catalog+-+SportsmansGuide.com&utm_source=VigLink&cjadvid=1522857&cjadv=CJTSGUSA

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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2013, 04:55:11 PM »
Thanks, Stan, I'll look at Empire, also...........I always liked capotes too, but thinking a sash will hold them where you want them is folly, at best 8)

 :)
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Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #19 on: January 30, 2013, 11:03:05 AM »
Holy moley! That's a LOT of bones for a coat...

Must be nice, though, eh?


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Offline Grabber

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #20 on: October 20, 2013, 12:36:20 AM »
http://www.thebushcraftstore.co.uk/ridgeline-monsoon-euro-ii-waterproof-smock-jacket---teak-7783-p.asp


Bought one of these a year or so ago.  Best purchase I've made since. 
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Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #21 on: October 21, 2013, 06:41:48 AM »
I am not a big fan of anoraks, especially canvas ones. I like my shell layers to be waterproof. I put them on when I need protection from rain, and I take them off when I don't. I don't want to wear a layer that is somewhat water resistant, but then I need to carry yet another layer in case it starts raining. That automatically limits the anorak for me only to cold weather travel where there is no possibility of rain. In such a situation, I have no use for it because the rest of my clothing is wild proof and sheds snow very well without the need for a separate layer.

I also find the design to be restrictive. I don't like coats that are that long. I find they limit movement over more difficult terrain and catch on things. It also creates a huge problem with ventilation, especially if you have a pack on. The fact that a material may be breathable does not prevent overheating. Also, in my opinion, breathability in cold climates is overrated, as moisture tends to freeze within the fabric itself before it can escape.

Most importantly for me however, when it comes to canvas anoraks at least, is the issue of the excessive weight and bulk. Where do you store the anorak when you take it off? My GoreTex jacket weighs 8oz and packs down to the size of an orange.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #22 on: October 21, 2013, 10:19:02 AM »
While I agree with Wood Trekker that synthetics are better than canvas in conditions where temperatures will rise above the melting point that is not what Anoraks are designed for.  Canvas Anoraks are universally used in arctic regions where temperatures do not rise anywhere near the melting point for long periods of time.  They are the outer garment of choice for most arctic expeditions.  I use mine when it is below zero around here and, coupled with its fur ruff, it is a very efficient cold weather article of clothing.  It is large enough to layer a lot of stuff under it and still offer good freedom of movement.  I don't find its length to be restrictive at all.  While I use Gore-Tex and other synthetics some of the time I don't like them as well as the Empire Canvas and Wool garment I use when it is really cold out. 
   
Canvas material is generally tougher than synthetic shells.  It better around the campfire than synthetics as well.  When working with cattle I prefer canvas bibs or coveralls in place of synthetics.  They are just a lot tougher material than any of my synthetics and waterproof enough for that kind of work. 

I believe that canvas breathes far better than Gore-Tex from my experience.   

If temperatures are going to rise above about thirty degrees F then the synthetics are better due to their waterproof qualities.  In mountain regions where weight is an issue they are superior. 

Here is a article about Empire Canvas and the owner.  Gives a little of his insight into why he prefers canvas over synthetics.

http://www.trailspace.com/articles/2009/04/02/gear-maker-profile-kevin-kinney-empire-canvas-works.html

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Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #23 on: October 21, 2013, 12:47:35 PM »
I agree with you that canvas is better around fire than most synthetics. As far as toughness, it depends on the synthetic material. There are many variants of cordura that are much stronger than any canvas for the same thickness.

Canvas is also more breathable than synthetic waterproof layers, but that's just because it is not waterproof. It is like comparing apples to oranges. There are many synthetic shells that are not waterproof that breathe just as well as canvas. My point about breathability is that in cold weather, I think it's benefits are greatly exaggerated. My experience has been that with anything more than just a base layer, if the temperature differential between your body temperature and the outside temperature is significant, the water vapor from your body will condense, and even freeze withing the insulation long before it reaches the outer shell. Thus the breathability issue becomes a lot less significant.

In the end though, those are just minor issues. The main reasons why I don't like traditional anoraks is that they are just not transportable. They are too heavy and too bulky when compared to other available options. If I have to carry my gear on my back, that is a huge consideration. Aside from that, I also take a different approach to layering, which requires a well fitted shell layer, which allows other insulation to go over it: http://woodtrekker.blogspot.com/2013/02/winter-clothing-layering-theory.html

That's not to discourage anyone from trying anoraks, they are just not my first choice.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #24 on: October 21, 2013, 12:51:54 PM »
I think the only point we disagree on is its breathability and the importance of that.  Cotton Anoraks are, in my opinion, superior when the temperature stays below freezing.  Cordura nylon is tough stuff but doesn't breathe well, if at all.  At any rate stay warm.  :)
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Offline Wood Trekker

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #25 on: October 21, 2013, 01:32:44 PM »
I think the only point we disagree on is its breathability and the importance of that.  Cotton Anoraks are, in my opinion, superior when the temperature stays below freezing.  Cordura nylon is tough stuff but doesn't breathe well, if at all.  At any rate stay warm.  :)

At the risk of keeping this going, I'll agree to disagree on the other points, but Cordura is actually very breathable. While it is made of nylon threads, they are woven, which in most cases makes the material very breathable and not waterproof.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Anorak
« Reply #26 on: October 21, 2013, 03:21:42 PM »
While some Cordura such as AFT is very breathable most of it is coated material and isn't.  I have read that the lighter uncoated Cordura breathes pretty well but the 1000 denier doesn't, coated or not.  So it really depends on what type you have it seems. 
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