Author Topic: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove  (Read 39857 times)

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Offline moa_shooter

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U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« on: February 10, 2013, 10:21:17 PM »
I couldn't find any reference on here to the U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent, so I thought I would post a few pictures of mine 8).  The tent was purchased a couple winters ago from California Army Navy Surplus http://www.calarmy.com/tents/ for $325USD shipped to Michigan.  Side walls are 2' high, floor is 13' wide and forms a hexagon. Made of canvas that was treated with waterproofing and fire repellent (although I doubt this is still effective.)  Silicone ring for a stove jack.  The liner weighs 15.6lbs, tent is 34lbs and all the aluminum pegs are 3.1lbs.  I've used it a few times and only for car camping due to the weight.  When the weather is above freezing the canvas will leak water especially around the seams but I'm hesitant to waterproof it since it is designed for sub zero temps and I believe it should be able to breath. 



It has a separate liner that attaches to the inside with lines to hang wet clothing to dry.  The centre pole is telescoping "magnesium" and weighs 6.6lbs.


Here are the instructions sewn into the interior.  Notice the lazy dude smoking the cigarette.


The tent packed the way I have it pictured below measures approximately 41" long and 39" in circumference and the liner is 19" long and 36" in circumference.  I keep the tent pegs and extra cordage in the little carry bag.



One drawback to this setup is things are pretty gloomy in there as the dark green canvas lets in no light at all.  I have toyed with the idea of retrofitting some white canvas panels to act like skylights.  A coleman lantern mounted on the centre pole is a must.



I've also considered making a tent from the liner.  Problem is there would be no snow skirt and you would have to patch all the grommet holes.

The stove is a Yukon M1950 model and was purchased from AA Surplus Sales http://www.aasurplus.com/Products/97-stove-yukon.aspx for $142USD shipped.  I see on their site that they are sold out but a quick google search shows they can still be found.  It measures 10" wide by 8" tall and 24" deep, nesting stove pipe with guy wires and lines to attach to the tent.  It can get pretty toasty with the stove going and I've had it glowing red a few times.  There is a burner assembly to burn gas and diesel but I didn't want to go down that road.  I understant that in the Canadian Forces they have a similar tent but rely on a Coleman stove for heat instead of the wood stove.  Several guys I've heard report that this will irritate your eyes from the fumes that are produced.



The yukon stove can keep things pretty toasty, so much so we were able to roast marshmallows over it.

"... fire is like a child that needs to be protected, respected, cared for, and ultimately, loved and appreciated." - Les Stroud

Offline Bearhunter

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U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2013, 10:30:28 PM »
Thanks for the info and pics.
One of those would be ideal for a backcountry elk camp if a fellow had a couple of horses.
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Offline SwampHanger

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2013, 03:41:04 AM »
Man that thing makes a heck of a base camp!

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2013, 05:39:12 AM »
   We used to stay in one of those style tents, back when I was in the Corps, during Cold Weather training. We had those Yukon stoves too, although I think they dripped diesel fuel when we used them. We called them "Bomb stoves".  or something like that... Don't remember the exact slang. No one really wanted to mess with them. If I remember correctly, someone would say something like, "Who has EOD tonite, if the "Bomb" acts up, or gets cold?" Something like that...
That was many many Budwiesers ago...Got Anhuesers disease now...which is much like the CRS affliction.
;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline MATT CHAOS

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2013, 06:17:08 AM »
Those tents are awesome.  I feel that your price of $325 is fair, too.  Rumor has it the older the tent like that the more you can get for it.  I have one that is pretty close to your's but mine is from 1927 (I think, I would have to check the stamped marking again to be sure).  The only really difference is the color, mine is a canvas dark tan color.  And mine is a pretty heavy duty canvas.  Also, my center polie is nonexistent and i have to use a piece of PVC.

You mentioned that the walls are only 2 feet tall.  Hmm mine possibly may be taller maybe 3 feet but I never measured for sure and I don't regularly use mine. 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2013, 07:25:25 AM »
   We used to stay in one of those style tents, back when I was in the Corps, during Cold Weather training. We had those Yukon stoves too, although I think they dripped diesel fuel when we used them. We called them "Bomb stoves".  or something like that... Don't remember the exact slang. No one really wanted to mess with them. If I remember correctly, someone would say something like, "Who has EOD tonite, if the "Bomb" acts up, or gets cold?" Something like that...
That was many many Budwiesers ago...Got Anhuesers disease now...which is much like the CRS affliction.
;)

I believe that I have one of those stoves, too :P.  As far as I know, it's never been fired up :shrug:   I don't even know how I came into it, but it seems like someone bought it in a "package'' deal on a farm sale or something, didn't want it, and just gave it to me :P  I remember reading the instructions that were still included in the firebox and it said you used it in conjunction with an upended G.I. jerry can?  Is that right?   Anyway, I don't own a Jerry can and it sounded like it could be the potential "bomb" that you're talking about, so I still own it and it's in really good shape with only a few little rust spots on it :).   eBay candidate :shrug:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2013, 08:21:28 AM »
I couldn't find any reference on here to the U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent, so I thought I would post a few pictures of mine 8).  The tent was purchased a couple winters ago from California Army Navy Surplus http://www.calarmy.com/tents/ for $325USD shipped to Michigan.  Side walls are 2' high, floor is 13' wide and forms a hexagon. Made of canvas that was treated with waterproofing and fire repellent (although I doubt this is still effective.)  Silicone ring for a stove jack.  The liner weighs 15.6lbs, tent is 34lbs and all the aluminum pegs are 3.1lbs.  I've used it a few times and only for car camping due to the weight.  When the weather is above freezing the canvas will leak water especially around the seams but I'm hesitant to waterproof it since it is designed for sub zero temps and I believe it should be able to breath. 



It has a separate liner that attaches to the inside with lines to hang wet clothing to dry.  The centre pole is telescoping "magnesium" and weighs 6.6lbs.


Here are the instructions sewn into the interior.  Notice the lazy dude smoking the cigarette.


The tent packed the way I have it pictured below measures approximately 41" long and 39" in circumference and the liner is 19" long and 36" in circumference.  I keep the tent pegs and extra cordage in the little carry bag.



One drawback to this setup is things are pretty gloomy in there as the dark green canvas lets in no light at all.  I have toyed with the idea of retrofitting some white canvas panels to act like skylights.  A coleman lantern mounted on the centre pole is a must.



I've also considered making a tent from the liner.  Problem is there would be no snow skirt and you would have to patch all the grommet holes.

The stove is a Yukon M1950 model and was purchased from AA Surplus Sales http://www.aasurplus.com/Products/97-stove-yukon.aspx for $142USD shipped.  I see on their site that they are sold out but a quick google search shows they can still be found.  It measures 10" wide by 8" tall and 24" deep, nesting stove pipe with guy wires and lines to attach to the tent.  It can get pretty toasty with the stove going and I've had it glowing red a few times.  There is a burner assembly to burn gas and diesel but I didn't want to go down that road.  I understant that in the Canadian Forces they have a similar tent but rely on a Coleman stove for heat instead of the wood stove.  Several guys I've heard report that this will irritate your eyes from the fumes that are produced.



The yukon stove can keep things pretty toasty, so much so we were able to roast marshmallows over it.



  The lantern looks like an oldy but goody,  I have a couple just like it that date back to '57 and '62 and they look and work like new,  as for your worry about Coleman heaters,  I have three of them that I've used since the early '70's,  I've used them in my tents and in my converted camper vans,  and for a while in the capped bed of my pick up truck,  I've never been bothered by any fume smells,  the tents breath enough for venting,  but I always crack a window open in the trucks when using them.
  I always use Coleman fuel so that might be the reason I don't get fumes,  the only smells I've ever experienced was if i let them run out of fuel which I don't usually do, they come with a domed cover that is used when the stove is not in use,  and is also used to put them out,  when you use the cover to shut them down they don't smell.
  If you find one used (one of the bigger ones) it might be a good option for you,  they will burn for about 18 hours on a filling set on medium,  they are compact to carry and do a good job at keeping your sized tent fairly warm in moderate cold.
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Offline kanukkarhu

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U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2013, 10:25:52 AM »
Wow, that is SO cool. What a dream that would be: a week or so in the winter bush with a tent like that... awesome!

Thanks or posting!


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Offline moa_shooter

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2013, 11:10:43 AM »
... I remember reading the instructions that were still included in the firebox and it said you used it in conjunction with an upended G.I. jerry can?  Is that right?  ...

Yes, you can still buy the fuel attachment on the net.  http://www.armysurpluswarehouse.com/outdoor-camping-gear/stoves-accessories/m1950-yukon-stove-burner-assembly.html

Here's a diagram of the setup:

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Offline moa_shooter

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2013, 11:14:32 AM »
...  as for your worry about Coleman heaters,  I have three of them that I've used since the early '70's,  I've used them in my tents and in my converted camper vans,  and for a while in the capped bed of my pick up truck,  I've never been bothered by any fume smells,  the tents breath enough for venting,  but I always crack a window open in the trucks when using them...

These guys who were getting red eyes and suffering from the fumes were using Coleman stoves and not heaters.  I suspect that there must have not been complete combustion of the fuel that caused it.
"... fire is like a child that needs to be protected, respected, cared for, and ultimately, loved and appreciated." - Les Stroud

Offline wolfy

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2013, 12:01:42 PM »
... I remember reading the instructions that were still included in the firebox and it said you used it in conjunction with an upended G.I. jerry can?  Is that right?  ...

Yes, you can still buy the fuel attachment on the net.  http://www.armysurpluswarehouse.com/outdoor-camping-gear/stoves-accessories/m1950-yukon-stove-burner-assembly.html

Here's a diagram of the setup:



I guess I wasn't being clear enough (not unusual), I have all of that assembly, but no hose or jerry can.  I'm not sure I want one, either :shrug:   Are there safety problems with leakage, etc.?
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Offline rogumpogum

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2013, 12:42:21 PM »
The instructions are great, lol!

Nice setup!
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Offline moa_shooter

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2013, 01:31:16 PM »
I guess I wasn't being clear enough (not unusual), I have all of that assembly, but no hose or jerry can.  I'm not sure I want one, either :shrug:   Are there safety problems with leakage, etc.?

Definite safety problems.  My understanding is that when one was operated there always had to be one guy on watch to make sure it didn't get out of hand.  I think the reason for the fuel assembly is that in the arctic there may not always be wood available.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2013, 01:35:18 PM »
Thanks, for the confirmation, moa...just what I needed, but didn't want to hear :cheers:
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Offline SwampHanger

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2013, 03:33:53 PM »
"Fire guard" when I trained with the Army at Ft Dix it was my turn to watch the coal burner. No one told the kracker from Florida that never even seen coal what to do. Well I filled that thing up yep the whole fire box turned red and people were drawing their feet up away from it. We didn't need anyone else to stay up for a while.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #15 on: February 11, 2013, 04:59:23 PM »
The way "we" saw it... It was a potential "Bomb" (still can't remember our slang term, but it involved "Bomb" or something like it...). That diesel drip, with the jerry can with the fuel in it, & we are supposed to sleep...  Yup... you betcha....
 ;)


"Firewatch" =  "EOD" ,
when we were in there, trying to sleep with the "Bomb"  stove...LOL
 :)


Long ago... But I still remember a bit of it...
 ;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Angerland

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #16 on: February 11, 2013, 05:26:15 PM »
well we used the 10 man versions for each squad while I was in  Alaska same jerry can set up with diesl or mogas and were never really that worried about it. we always had a guy up and just turned it down at night so it was warm but not cherry red. we also kept a fire extinguisher right at the center pole for quick use.

One fun fact was that the best way to loosen up the carbon that would coat the inside was to throw in one .556 blank round. If you could pullit off on another squad while you were in for a visit and leave before the bang that was alwys fun. Another trick my PSG always did was to sit there talking and stealthily pour out some tobassco sauce from hsi little MRE botte on the hot surface...almost as bad a MACE for all the guys in the tent.
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Offline Gurthy

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #17 on: February 11, 2013, 09:40:42 PM »
Man, that sure brings back memories! We used the same tent/stove setup during cold weather training back in the day. We would drag that damn thing around on an akio (sled) with waist harnesses like sled dogs. Man that sucked.


Oh, by the way, the official military term for "lazy dude smoking a cigarette" is "officer."  :)

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #18 on: February 12, 2013, 07:46:53 AM »

Oh, by the way, the official military term for "lazy dude smoking a cigarette" is "officer."  :)


 :rofl:


That is funny...
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #19 on: February 12, 2013, 06:25:06 PM »
Great thread, lots of good info here! :thumbsup:

Offline jfish

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2013, 07:12:24 PM »
Moa,  Great looking set up there.  Been using a GP Small (5' walls) with a Yukon 1950 for winter hunting trips about ten years, only way to go.   All ways wondered how you would handle the heat in an Arctic Tent?  Those Yukons will run you out if you stoke it..lol..lol...

 Something you may want to try with regarding to getting better burn control with your stove, found it to be a big after a sub freezing night in the WVa mts.  80+ in the tent 17 outside.  You could never really cut the draft to a slow burn.   If all you are ever going to burn is coal or wood have the round flap on the top sealed shut (weld).  You have to braze it due to the steel used but seal it off.  Add a wood stove gasket around the door entrance and you can throttle back the O2 and slow the burn significantly.    You're still not going to get a full night (6-7 hours) on one stoke but you can extend it to 5 hours pretty regular (seasoned oak).   

Spent many many cold nights in that GP, teens outside, warm as a bug inside..  Nothing beats a wood stove when it cold and wet.   

Regarding any leaks, if yours is like mine Father Time has taken it's toll on the stitching and canvas.  If you want to treat it use, Olympic Deck Sealer not Thompson's.  Olympic is wax linseed oil based while Thompson petroleum based.   Helps but doesn't completely stop the drips.  Ended up buying a green pool cover (round 18') and it fits perfectly over the top with about a foot or so over hang.  Cut a hole for the stove pipe and no more leaks!  Spent two days last season in down pours and dry as a bone inside.   

Good luck and post more pics, love see how others make their camp. 

Offline K7CDL

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2014, 06:27:49 AM »
just found this site. been thinking of one of these for Wyoming winter camping. how well would two 77"L x 25"W x 17"H Cots fit in this tent with the M1950 Stove? would there be much room left?
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« Last Edit: January 11, 2014, 06:55:05 AM by K7CDL »

Offline JTD

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2014, 08:11:27 AM »
Thanks for the post.  Very cool rig

Offline wsdstan

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2014, 11:15:15 AM »
Here is a 1955 video on winter camps in the Army.  At about 14:50 they start erecting the tent and then it goes through the assembly of the stove components to burn gasoline followed by using it for wood.

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Offline mhm123g

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #24 on: January 21, 2014, 10:18:53 AM »
 :( Never never use gas in these stoves!!!
 I was stationed in Germany during the mid 80's and in the field in winter we used these. We always used diesel  to power them. Problem was that in sub 0 temps the diesel would jell in our vehicles. So it became a common practice to add a couple of cups of mo gas  [lo octaine regular] to the vehicles to stop the jelling. What happened next was tragic one night one tent ran out of fuel and siphoned the diesel out of a 5 ton. Those 3 men never woke up. One an officer. They all died from carbon monoxide poisoning. Any type of gas produces co. Diesel and kerosine do not. I think Colman is a high grade diesel but not sure. After this incident clean diesel was always provided and we started keeping the cans inside. Kind of crazy to sleep next to 10 or 15 gal. of diesel but it is what we did. Extended cold can make you do funny things. Like as in 30+ days. I cant imagine spending a whole tour in sub zero temps.

out

Offline wolfy

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #25 on: January 21, 2014, 10:29:07 AM »
mhm, thanks for the warning!   I believe Coleman fuel is naphtha & kerosene is high grade diesel fuel (jet fuel) or what is sold as 1K kerosene for heaters, lamps, lanterns, etc. :shrug:
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Offline mhm123g

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #26 on: January 21, 2014, 10:54:24 AM »
 Sound like it is safe.Expensive though.. It is easy to go through 5 gal. on a really cold 24 hrs.day night.
One other note on the positive . These things work great. In really cold temps. with cold diesel they can be hard to get lit. The trick is to put a bunch of paper or cardboard in the back of the box and a small piece in the drip pan. Light the the paper in the back to get the draft going. Once the draft is going drip a little fuel on the paper in the pan and ignite it. Close the door and start your drip slow at first then more once the jets take off. By the way if you open her up she will turn cherry red including the stove pipe and eat allot of fuel in the process. Tents have been known to not rely catch fire but lets say get char coaled and burnt around the baffle. Believe me I did it. When you sleep, if you do not have a fire watch, throttle it back to keep it just above freezing. It only takes a couple of minutes to get it hot in a small tent when you wake up.

out

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #27 on: January 21, 2014, 01:47:44 PM »
    Well, after reading the last few posts, I remember that they were "multi -fuel" & that even though I think we used diesel fuel back we were using them, I know that gasoline is a fuel source for these stoves as well as kerosene/JP4/JP5 when the stove has the conversion it for liquid fuels. They can also burn wood/coal. So, out of curiosity , after reading the post about not using gasoline, I went & checked out the Service manual , just to get things right in my mind:
http://www.liberatedmanuals.com/TM-10-4500-200-13.pdf


  I looking through it I noticed that on the first page of the manual is some safety precautions. Here are just a few that I noticed among those there:


   Before Operations
  • Do not operate heater in a totally confined area. Sufficient ventilation to eliminate the accumulation of carbon monoxide fumes must be available
  • Keep fuel outside the tent. Never store spare can of fuel in the tent.
   During Operations
  • Do not operate the stove at full blast even in extremely cold weather. Overheated stovepipe may ignite tentage
     
   Those are just a few items of the lists, but I thought I would mention them , since I "do" remember us having a firewatch. That was the "EOD" quip in my earlier post... the "EOD" was the "firewatch".. We just joked around by calling the FireWatch an ExplosiveOrdinanceD isposal, because of the "bomb" nickname we gave the stoves.
  We maintained a firewatch every time that stove was lit. At least that was the SOP for our unit when we were using them.


   That Firewatch covered the making sure that folks didn't get CO1 poisoning, or that the tent didn't ignite from too much heat, or us freeze our behinds off because it burned too low, etc..


   Also, folks should know that not only gasoline gives of CO1, but diesel , kerosene & the other fuels do also, although in smaller amounts, but it is still there to be concerned about. And , yes, mixing of fuels can be hazardous & is not recommended for use in these stoves.
:)


   
    Well, I just wanted to clear up some things. I am all for passing on information, but it seems to me to be a good idea to make sure that it is as accurate as possible. Thus this post. No intentions of causing any hassles. Just wanting to get the best info out that is possible so folks are not misinformed.
 :)


  BTW, I am sad to hear that some fellow service members lost their lives due to such circumstances that may have been prevented.
 :( 
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #28 on: January 21, 2014, 02:32:23 PM »
    Well, after reading the last few posts, I remember that they were "multi -fuel" & that even though I think we used diesel fuel back we were using them, I know that gasoline is a fuel source for these stoves as well as kerosene/JP4/JP5 when the stove has the conversion it for liquid fuels. They can also burn wood/coal. So, out of curiosity , after reading the post about not using gasoline, I went & checked out the Service manual , just to get things right in my mind:
http://www.liberatedmanuals.com/TM-10-4500-200-13.pdf


  I looking through it I noticed that on the first page of the manual is some safety precautions. Here are just a few that I noticed among those there:


   Before Operations
  • Do not operate heater in a totally confined area. Sufficient ventilation to eliminate the accumulation of carbon monoxide fumes must be available
  • Keep fuel outside the tent. Never store spare can of fuel in the tent.
   During Operations
  • Do not operate the stove at full blast even in extremely cold weather. Overheated stovepipe may ignite tentage
     
   Those are just a few items of the lists, but I thought I would mention them , since I "do" remember us having a firewatch. That was the "EOD" quip in my earlier post... the "EOD" was the "firewatch".. We just joked around by calling the FireWatch an ExplosiveOrdinanceD isposal, because of the "bomb" nickname we gave the stoves.
  We maintained a firewatch every time that stove was lit. At least that was the SOP for our unit when we were using them.


   That Firewatch covered the making sure that folks didn't get CO1 poisoning, or that the tent didn't ignite from too much heat, or us freeze our behinds off because it burned too low, etc..


   Also, folks should know that not only gasoline gives of CO1, but diesel , kerosene & the other fuels do also, although in smaller amounts, but it is still there to be concerned about. And , yes, mixing of fuels can be hazardous & is not recommended for use in these stoves.
:)


   
    Well, I just wanted to clear up some things. I am all for passing on information, but it seems to me to be a good idea to make sure that it is as accurate as possible. Thus this post. No intentions of causing any hassles. Just wanting to get the best info out that is possible so folks are not misinformed.
 :)


  BTW, I am sad to hear that some fellow service members lost their lives due to such circumstances that may have been prevented.
 :(

JB,

You beat me to it. 

Completely agree with you on all points, but especially on the point about the CO from combustion of all fuels.

Well said my friend. 
Upon this a question arises: whether it be better to be loved than feared or feared than loved? One should wish to be both, but, because it is difficult to unite them in one person, it is much safer to be feared than loved.

Offline upthecreek

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #29 on: January 21, 2014, 07:23:42 PM »
Not to derail nor insight. Any combustion regardless of fuel source will use oxygen. In an enclosed space without additional oxygen. You will suffocate. Period.

Creek

I cant wait to get my new scout tent!
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Offline upthecreek

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #30 on: January 21, 2014, 07:25:48 PM »
I'll add that it isn't necessarily carbon monoxide that kills, oxygen deprivation is just as deadly.

Creek
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Offline lgm

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #31 on: January 21, 2014, 08:24:40 PM »
I remember using the tent & stove in the Corps also. We always keep the fuel as far away as we could.
Thought about getting a tent for the adults in scout. That are cool.
What a great day to be outside.

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #32 on: November 12, 2014, 12:16:38 PM »
:( Never never use gas in these stoves!!!
 I was stationed in Germany during the mid 80's and in the field in winter we used these. We always used diesel  to power them. Problem was that in sub 0 temps the diesel would jell in our vehicles. So it became a common practice to add a couple of cups of mo gas  [lo octaine regular] to the vehicles to stop the jelling. What happened next was tragic one night one tent ran out of fuel and siphoned the diesel out of a 5 ton. Those 3 men never woke up. One an officer. They all died from carbon monoxide poisoning. Any type of gas produces co. Diesel and kerosine do not. I think Colman is a high grade diesel but not sure. After this incident clean diesel was always provided and we started keeping the cans inside. Kind of crazy to sleep next to 10 or 15 gal. of diesel but it is what we did. Extended cold can make you do funny things. Like as in 30+ days. I cant imagine spending a whole tour in sub zero temps.

out

I thought anything that burned produced carbon monoxide? Please expound.

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Re: U.S. Army Surplus 5 Man Arctic Tent and Yukon M1950 Stove
« Reply #33 on: November 12, 2014, 01:42:15 PM »
You're right. Diesel especially. I had a friend that always left his window cracked open in the big rig. One night a flat top Pete parked beside him with the 8" stack aimed right at his window. He woke up to cramped muscles and couldn't get up. He crawled out the door and onto the ground where he lay for some time. Was very lucky.
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