Author Topic: YakBakDekPak  (Read 2623 times)

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Offline Exploriment

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YakBakDekPak
« on: July 21, 2013, 11:14:34 PM »

Had an idea for a backpack that could function both as a deck bag for my kayak that I'm building, but also be easy detach and serve as a day pack when I wanted to get out of the kayak and head of to explore. Besides that, I also wanted a pack somewhat similar to what the Hill People Gear bags are meant to do - compression panels on a frame with a larger pack sack between the two. I knew it would be meant to serve in conjunction with my Kifaru PackFrame, so built it with that in mind.

Rather than reformating it all for here, if these photos interest you, I'll just stick a link to the blog post after the photos, and you can read more about it there.

Oh and I sewed the whole thing by hand. 
  ???




http://exploriment.blogspot.ca/2013/07/yakbakdekpak.html
« Last Edit: July 21, 2013, 11:20:31 PM by Exploriment »

Offline greyhound352

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #1 on: July 22, 2013, 03:44:49 AM »
Wow that is a great looking pack!

I went back to your blog and read the rest about the pack. That is a well thought out and designed pack
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Offline Yeoman

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2013, 08:04:03 AM »
Man, that's something else. That is a really new (to me) pack concept. Is it unique to Hill People?
Some of your finest work (except maybe the kayak)
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Offline Exploriment

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2013, 08:28:46 AM »
You mean the idea of a smaller pack on the front of a packsack mounted on a frame? Not sure if it's unique to HPG. The idea of a frame with a bag on it isn't really new, nor is the idea of people lashing a variety of bags and drybags on to a frame a new idea. Certainly there are quite a few commercial backpacks with a day pack mounted on the front. Kifaru has offered packs for years that you could "Dock'n'Lock" to the outside of a larger pack. The overbuilt quality of their stuff makes for a very heavy package then, and depending on the size of the bag, puts the second pack far out from the center of gravity. My idea with the packsack I want to make is to make it a little bit wider, a little bit taller, but keep the depth to a minimum to avoid having things too far out from the COG.

In an earlier incarnation of a day pack I could dismount and head off with, I made a smallish square and rectangular pack that I could mount atop the pack under a top lid. That way the COG issue wasn't one, but it was a smallish pack. What I could carry was a very bare bones, minimal survival setup.

I wanted a pack that could not only sit atop my kayak deck, but also carry a bit more than an E&E type set up. Some slightly cushier stuff. The other thing is that I want those, whatever you want to call them, 10 essentials or whatever, in one bag, so that it never really changed. I find myself forever futzing around, swapping stuff from bag to bag, getting out to where I am and realizing that the spoon I was meant to eat my lunch with is in that other pouch, and the batteries were forgotten in that other pack. Keep it all together and only have the seasonal/length of trip stuff to change around.

I have been mulling over perhaps two packsacks. Two reasons. I was thinking of having two about the same size, so I could mount them as panniers on a bike, take them off and mount them on a pack frame and head off into areas that a bike couldn't go. The other reason is that some stuff doesn't really change. I'll have a tarp/bivvy/hammock/quilt/underquilt setup, set of night clothes, a few other things, whether I spend the night out no matter what the weather/season. What changes is the amount of food, and the amount of insulation. In the second packsack have more food, another layer to sleep under, warmer clothes. That's one approach I could take.

Or I may just go with one roll top pack sack, and I'll have to take a few minutes to repack if I head out to camp in winter or hunt in fall, etc. No biggy, but it is good to contemplate options. I may just make both to try them out.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2013, 06:59:02 PM by Exploriment »

Offline zammer

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2013, 12:13:16 PM »
LOL...love the "Made in Hamilton " patch, nice touch. :thumbsup:  I don't have any tips to offer, but I think the idea of an easily lashed pack that you can undo and hike with is a great idea, look forward to seeing the final results lashed to the deck of that great looking Kayak.
"big fish like to live in bad places, that's how they get to be big fish"

Offline Exploriment

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2013, 12:23:27 PM »
As soon as I saw that patch at MixedMedia, I knew I had to grab one to stick to anything I make whenever I take a photo of it. I may not have been made here, but I figure I "gotta represent the hood" as far as the stuff I make goes.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2013, 06:59:22 PM by Exploriment »

Offline hunter63

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2013, 02:28:14 PM »
Very cool....does a pack ever get...done?
You have really peaked my interest.
Thanks for the post and pic's.
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Offline Exploriment

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Re: YakBakDekPak
« Reply #7 on: July 23, 2013, 07:07:15 PM »
Quote
Very cool....does a pack ever get...done?

No, I don't think it ever does. I think this great passage by Horace Kephart sums it all up. I have the feeling that I will be forever making, tweaking, fixing, rebuilding  things, until finally at 90 something I will have THE perfect setup. And then I will keel over the next day.

"The only way to have it so is to do the work yourself. One can wear ready-made clothing, he can exist in ready-furnished rooms, but a ready-made camping outfit is a delusion and a snare. It is sure to be loaded with gimcracks that you have no use for, and to lack something that you will be miserable without.

It is great fun, in the long winter evenings, to sort over your beloved duffel, to make and fit up the little boxes and hold-alls in which everything has its proper place, to contrive new wrinkles that nobody but yourself has the gigantic brain to conceive, to concoct mysterious dopes that fill the house with unsanctimonious smells, to fish around for materials, in odd corners where you have no business, and, generally, to set the female members of the household buzzing around in curiosity, disapproval, and sundry other states of mind.

To be sure, even though a man rigs up his own outfit, he never gets it quite to suit him. Every season sees the downfall of some cherished scheme, the failure of some fond contrivance. Every winter sees you again fussing over your kit, altering this, substituting that, and flogging your wits with the same old problem of how to save weight and bulk without sacrifice of utility. All thoroughbred campers do this as regularly as the birds come back in spring.

And their kind has been doing it since the world began. It is good for us. If some misguided genius should invent a camping equipment body that none could find fault with, half our pleasure in life would be swept away."


Quote
You have really peaked my interest.

Well, that makes me glad. If nothing else I want to plant the idea in peoples heads that they too can make anything they set their minds to. No matter what limitations they think face them.