Author Topic: What are you reading?  (Read 92280 times)

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Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #200 on: March 07, 2016, 06:40:51 PM »
That sounds like a terrific book Craig.  Especially his observations about the scouts, who are three of the best.  I will have to see if our library can get it. 
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Offline Unknown

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #201 on: March 07, 2016, 06:46:52 PM »
Hmm, interesting...but probably not so much for me to dive in.

Isn't it always the way with underlings questioning the wisdom of their superiors? I did it (justifiably so) when I was lower on the totem in the dumb ole construction field, and had it done to me later on. It happens to every manager, Officer in the military, almost any leader-I think- 
   At times those sorts of critique are possibly valid because those making the assessments aren't dealing with the stresses of the whole picture, kinda gives them a laid-back pigeon hole view of what's going on. Sometimes valid on the whole, more often self-serving imho.

I have had some darn good cabesa tacos, which is beef cheek(I think). probably not the same as mule head, but I would trade you that for the "beef gizzard"  I was served once.

Me? I dont read nuttin' but what you said. :-[
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #202 on: March 07, 2016, 06:54:48 PM »
Fremont deserved all the questions about his wisdom he got.  He made a lot of serious mistakes, in California, during the Civil War, and on his expeditions.  His last one, down in southern Colorado was a disaster. 
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Offline Unknown

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #203 on: March 07, 2016, 07:13:08 PM »
Ohhh, come on Man. He's not so bad. I'm startin' to identify with him.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #204 on: March 07, 2016, 07:22:19 PM »
The men under his command that either froze to death, starved to death or had to resort to cannibalism in order to survive might have a differing opinion. :lol:

That mountain howitzer that they were ordered to so labourisly haul through deep snow and jumbled boulders, set in place in front of Fremont's tent every single night and finally ended up abandoning, near present-day Carson City, was fired only ONE time and that was when they were trying kill a buffalo with it!  :P :doh:
« Last Edit: March 07, 2016, 07:32:04 PM by wolfy »
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Offline Unknown

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #205 on: March 07, 2016, 07:56:40 PM »
I forget how many died, 10 or 20, more? You could find that many wimps in any crowd of 35, 40 today.

I dont know about the gun.

Having made so many expeditions, he must have had some successes(?) I just don't know enough to evaluate whether he was only pleasing to his masters,(and so allowed to continue on at any cost)
 a victim of fate, I'm not sure. Perhaps he was just a misguided opportunist that any other might have filled the role of, and as such, made many a fubar- but- that was a crazycrazy time. It would take a lot of digging to get the full spectrum of influence.

I tip my hat to the depth of your investigation sensei.  Was he a Confederate tool, used by the powerful interests at the time into unwitting circumstance? In the end he died poor, right? I see where he's headed, just now
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #206 on: March 07, 2016, 09:35:47 PM »
He was politically connected.  His wife was the daughter of Senator Thomas Hart Benton.  His legacy is more one of political manipulation than accomplishment.  He more or less hired the right guides (Kit Carson and Jim Bridger) and then followed them around.  His last expedition in Southern Colorado was scouted by Bill Williams because Carson turned him down.  He was advised not to try his route that time of year but chose to anyway. 

This quote from Wikipedia pretty much sums him up. "Historians portray Fremont as controversial, impetuous, and contradictory. Some scholars regard him as a military hero of significant accomplishment, while others view him as a failure who repeatedly defeated his own best purposes. The keys to Fremont's character and personality may lie in his being born illegitimately, his ambitious drive for success, self-justification, and passive-aggressive behavior." 
« Last Edit: March 08, 2016, 10:17:30 AM by wsdstan »
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #207 on: March 07, 2016, 10:05:44 PM »
That pretty well nails it, Stan.  That last foray, that Bill Williams ended up leading, almost killed him when he became confused from freezing cold and starvation and getting them all lost, too.  Fremont was wise (or just very lucky) to choose Charles Preuss (a civilian) to do the surveying, sketching and subsequent map making.   He did a superb job.  They ended up with a map that filled in all the gaps and put to rest the wild speculation that existed in all of the previous maps of the mountainous regions of the western frontier.   The ironic thing about it is, that Jedediah Smith probably had very similar information and maps that he'd drawn and had in his possession when he was killed by Indians in 1831....nearly 17 years prior to Fremont's expeditions. :-\

There is a framable and readable copy of the final Preuss map available, but it costs $90.....I'm tempted. :[
« Last Edit: March 07, 2016, 10:38:15 PM by wolfy »
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Offline Unknown

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #208 on: March 08, 2016, 07:08:50 AM »
Wow. I'll have to review the rest of that wikipedia entry. I told ya I was starting to identify with him. I better straighten up.
 
 
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Offline madmax

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #209 on: March 08, 2016, 08:03:41 AM »
"The Swamp".  The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise.  Michael Grunwald.

I'll let you know when I finish.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #210 on: March 09, 2016, 10:25:12 AM »
  I've just finished reading Of Blood and Suffering, the Regaining of Lost Freedom by Robert LaVoy Finnicum, it's a fictional novel about a scattered ranching family caught in the wake of an EMP attack on the US and their individual struggles to to get back to their home,  and then their struggle along with their neighbors to defend what they have against the forces of the HLS agency and those of their neighbors who have not prepared for a world turned upside down. 

  I'd suggest that it's a good read,  and one that will provoke some heavy thinking for some.    :thumbsup:

  * LaVoy Finnicum was the Rancher that was shot and killed by the FBI's HRT team and state police officers during a takeover of a wildlife preserve building,  he was shot and killed during a car stop where officials claim they were serving an arrest warrant on Finnicum.
     The details of the shooting are still being investigated, five FBI agents are facing charges of falsifying reports in the case,  Police claim he was reaching for a gun while other witnesses at the scene claim that the FBI and State Police murdered Finnicum in cold blood,  he was shot nine times by at least four officers and or federal agents.
     A grainy video released by the FBI tend to show Finnicum reaching for his left side, the suggestion made was that he was reaching for a weapon,  witnesses claim he was shot in the side while he had his hands up in surrendering and only grabbed for his side when the bullet hit him, then he was shot several more times and again as he lay in the snow dying.   
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Offline Fink

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #211 on: March 10, 2016, 01:25:12 AM »
I have been listening to the  Arisen Series by Michael Stephen Fuchs and Glynn James. Good stuff!

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Offline zammer

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #212 on: March 11, 2016, 05:05:09 PM »
"The Swamp".  The Everglades, Florida, and the Politics of Paradise.  Michael Grunwald.

I'll let you know when I finish.

Look forward to your thoughts on that as you live in the Sunshine state.  :cheers:
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Offline vonrichthofen

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #213 on: March 14, 2016, 05:30:46 PM »
Reading Pedro, by Pedro Martinez.  An amazing individual besides being one of the smartest pitchers to ever play the game.  He noticed everything. Once struck out a batter on three straight curve balls because he noticed that the pitchers mound was in shadow and the plate was in the sun.  He figured the batter would have an obscured view of his delivery, and with the sun in his eyes would not see the curve on the ball very well.  He was not as big as most pitchers but more than made up for it by being such a fierce competitor.  Sure do miss him in Boston.
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Offline Electric Cowboy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #214 on: March 20, 2016, 05:06:46 PM »
Follow the Rabbit proof Fence, Doris Pilkington.
Based on a true story.
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Offline Electric Cowboy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #215 on: March 20, 2016, 05:09:51 PM »
  I've just finished reading Of Blood and Suffering, the Regaining of Lost Freedom by Robert LaVoy Finnicum, it's a fictional novel about a scattered ranching family caught in the wake of an EMP attack on the US and their individual struggles to to get back to their home,  and then their struggle along with their neighbors to defend what they have against the forces of the HLS agency and those of their neighbors who have not prepared for a world turned upside down. 

  I'd suggest that it's a good read,  and one that will provoke some heavy thinking for some.    :thumbsup:

  * LaVoy Finnicum was the Rancher that was shot and killed by the FBI's HRT team and state police officers during a takeover of a wildlife preserve building,  he was shot and killed during a car stop where officials claim they were serving an arrest warrant on Finnicum.
     The details of the shooting are still being investigated, five FBI agents are facing charges of falsifying reports in the case,  Police claim he was reaching for a gun while other witnesses at the scene claim that the FBI and State Police murdered Finnicum in cold blood,  he was shot nine times by at least four officers and or federal agents.
     A grainy video released by the FBI tend to show Finnicum reaching for his left side, the suggestion made was that he was reaching for a weapon,  witnesses claim he was shot in the side while he had his hands up in surrendering and only grabbed for his side when the bullet hit him, then he was shot several more times and again as he lay in the snow dying.

Thanks Moe, I gave it a read. Not Bad.
Deus Vult

Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #216 on: March 20, 2016, 08:38:42 PM »
More Bernard Cornwell....
'The Pagan Lord'   :cheers:
Also re-reading 'The Burning Land' for the third time. Very captivating books, hard to put down.
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Offline Carson

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #217 on: March 21, 2016, 02:40:19 PM »
More Bernard Cornwell....
'The Pagan Lord'   :cheers:
Also re-reading 'The Burning Land' for the third time. Very captivating books, hard to put down.

White hot historical fiction! I have read the entire series up to the latest Warriors in the Storm. He has not got there yet so more to come. I like his short Arthur series too, The Winter King etc.
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Offline NewEnglandBushcraft

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #218 on: March 21, 2016, 08:14:49 PM »
More Bernard Cornwell....
'The Pagan Lord'   :cheers:
Also re-reading 'The Burning Land' for the third time. Very captivating books, hard to put down.

White hot historical fiction! I have read the entire series up to the latest Warriors in the Storm. He has not got there yet so more to come. I like his short Arthur series too, The Winter King etc.
I've got some catching up to do lol. 'Lords of the North' is on my next must-read list :). Besides the other two I mentioned earlier, I also have 'Sword Song' and 'The Last Kingdom'.

Probably some of the best historical fiction out there.  8)
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Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #219 on: March 31, 2016, 08:46:03 AM »
Just finished  Salt A World History written by Mark Kurlansky. You know a book is good when it drives you to learn more and that is what Salt did for me. There is obviously history, but also took away lessons on cooking, geology, and cartography. It is an easy read, flows well and is not bogged down with  obscure technical terms and pretentious prose. I am ordering Kurlansky's book The Basque History Of The World, being partially Basque I am hoping it is as good as Salt is.


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Offline Mannlicher

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #220 on: March 31, 2016, 10:00:35 AM »
I really enjoy Brit murder mysteries, both on TV and in book form.  Just downloaded from kindle, a 4 volume set of murders by Alan Hunter, featuring Inspector George Gently.  The books are very different from the TV show portrayal of the detective.

Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #221 on: March 31, 2016, 10:01:45 AM »
Just finished  Salt A World History written by Mark Kurlansky. You know a book is good when it drives you to learn more and that is what Salt did for me. There is obviously history, but also took away lessons on cooking, geology, and cartography. It is an easy read, flows well and is not bogged down with  obscure technical terms and pretentious prose. I am ordering Kurlansky's book The Basque History Of The World, being partially Basque I am hoping it is as good as Salt is.




Thanks for the evaluation of SALT, Orbean. :thumbsup:    I just saw it offered on Thriftbooks website for $3.59 a couple of days ago......I'm going for it if they still have it. :)
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Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #222 on: March 31, 2016, 10:37:12 AM »
The Oregon Trail: sketches of prairie and Rocky Mountain life. by Francis Parkman (1823-1893)  Freebie on Kindle Books.
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Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #223 on: March 31, 2016, 10:38:56 AM »
Just finished  Salt A World History written by Mark Kurlansky. You know a book is good when it drives you to learn more and that is what Salt did for me. There is obviously history, but also took away lessons on cooking, geology, and cartography. It is an easy read, flows well and is not bogged down with  obscure technical terms and pretentious prose. I am ordering Kurlansky's book The Basque History Of The World, being partially Basque I am hoping it is as good as Salt is.


Are lady Basque people called Basquettes?  Sorry, I'll just get my hat and coat....
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #224 on: March 31, 2016, 11:25:00 AM »
The Oregon Trail: sketches of prairie and Rocky Mountain life. by Francis Parkman (1823-1893)  Freebie on Kindle Books.
That oughta keep ya' busy for a while. ;D
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Offline Quenchcrack

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #225 on: March 31, 2016, 02:32:59 PM »
Wolfy, I started this book last year but stopped reading before I finished.  Not sure why.  CRAFT is setting in.  It is an interesting book, lots of prose and humor typical of Mark Twain.
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Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #226 on: March 31, 2016, 07:09:30 PM »
Just finished  Salt A World History written by Mark Kurlansky. You know a book is good when it drives you to learn more and that is what Salt did for me. There is obviously history, but also took away lessons on cooking, geology, and cartography. It is an easy read, flows well and is not bogged down with  obscure technical terms and pretentious prose. I am ordering Kurlansky's book The Basque History Of The World, being partially Basque I am hoping it is as good as Salt is.


Are lady Basque people called Basquettes?  Sorry, I'll just get my hat and coat....

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Offline Trekster

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #227 on: March 31, 2016, 07:45:09 PM »
Just finished  Salt A World History written by Mark Kurlansky. You know a book is good when it drives you to learn more and that is what Salt did for me. There is obviously history, but also took away lessons on cooking, geology, and cartography. It is an easy read, flows well and is not bogged down with  obscure technical terms and pretentious prose. I am ordering Kurlansky's book The Basque History Of The World, being partially Basque I am hoping it is as good as Salt is.


Are lady Basque people called Basquettes?  Sorry, I'll just get my hat and coat....

Quenchcrack will be performing two shows nightly. Remember folks it is a two drink minimum and be sure to tip your waitress.

I'll give her my tip in any way she desires!
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Offline RedBeard

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #228 on: March 31, 2016, 09:15:51 PM »
It took me a bit of getting used to. But using the kindle app for Android, I set the color to sepia and turn down the brightness all the way, then adjust the font size. I have read thousands of pages on my tablet this way. I still like a good book for its relative permanence. It doesn't need batteries or any learning beyond the ability to read. But the cost savings and convenience of E books is compelling.

For things like reference materials and how-to books, I like to have a hard copy that will work in a power outage. I like recipes in electronic form since I can print it out and take the page in the kitchen where it can get splashed with oil, tomato sauce, and all the other pitfalls in the kitchen without damaging my only copy.

Another advantage E books have is that they don't make your fingers cramp from propping open a thick springy paperback for hours at a time, especially if you like to hold the book in one hand to have another hand free to sip a drink, snack, etc.

Besides if you can read B&B on a tablet comfortably, a book is an easy transition.  ;D
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #229 on: March 31, 2016, 10:32:43 PM »
RedBeard a Kindle would be a good idea for me to get.  I have way to many books, around 1000, and shelf space for about 500.  They have run me out of my office room at home and they spilled into the living room and just about every table has some stacked there waiting to be read or put in a proper shelf. 

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Offline pommie

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #230 on: April 01, 2016, 06:12:28 AM »
A little heart felt book by her mother.

http://www.bookdepository.com/book/9781405923644/?a_aid=irisgracepainting   free shipping.

about the life of a little girl with autism and a cat.

Got the book yesterday and already 100 pages into it. Very artistic little girl that needed some help to come out of her shell.

Offline gene stoner

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #231 on: April 09, 2016, 11:18:38 AM »

Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #232 on: May 18, 2016, 10:28:06 AM »
Looking for some book recommendations covering the age of exploration. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #233 on: May 18, 2016, 10:37:24 AM »
Here are a couple I would recommend.  They deal with America.

Undaunted Courage by Stephen Ambrose.  An easy to read account of Lewis and Clark's expedition.

Exploration and Empire by William Goetzmann.  This books deals with the exploration of the American west from Lewis and Clark to John Wesley Powell.  One of the best books on the expansion and exploration of the country I have read.

If you are after earlier expeditions such as those coming from Europe in the 1500's then look up Cortex, Pizarro, and Ponce De Leon.

 
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Offline madmax

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #234 on: May 18, 2016, 10:45:04 AM »
A Land Remembered.  Patrick Smith.  FL homesteading.
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Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #235 on: May 18, 2016, 11:34:49 AM »
Undaunted courage I have read several times, IMO it is a classic. Exploration and empire I will lookup. Florida homesteading sounds interesting. Thank you
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #236 on: June 19, 2016, 12:53:13 PM »
I am over half way through THE WORST HARD TIME by Timothy Egan.  It is the story and recorded true account of many of those who remained in the heart of the Dust Bowl during the absolute worst conditions one could possibly imagine.  Many people gave up and left, like the mythical Joad family in Steinbeck's novel THE GRAPES OF WRATH, but this is the true story of those that stayed!   It's hard to read about the unbelievable hardship, desperation, and decade-long incessant weather conditions, but almost impossible to put down!  I highly recommend it. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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Offline Unknown

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #237 on: June 19, 2016, 01:45:42 PM »
What things made them stay, briefly is okay? It's nearly unimaginable to remain, try and get through considering the hardships and dangers, toils those folks faced.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #238 on: June 19, 2016, 02:19:20 PM »
Most of the residents who stayed, either had deep family roots and ties to the land or had arrived from elsewhere with nothing to begin with.  The newer residents were mortgaged to the hilt by failing banks and those who did have a nest egg, from having lived through more prosperous times, saw those meager savings dwindle through taxation.  They could not sell because there were no buyers who would pay for what the land was worth.  They could leave and lose what little they did have, but there were no jobs anywhere in the country due to the economic times of 'The Great Depression.'  They were trapped....and knew it, but had no alternative, except to weather the storm and pray for better times to return.  It's a chilling story.
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Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #239 on: June 19, 2016, 05:52:51 PM »
The Ice Master, The Doomed 1913 Voyage of the Karluk. Written by Jennifer Niven. A man named Vilhjalmur Stefansson, a polar explorer abandoned his crew because of his impatience with the Arctic ice pack. The book is the story of their self rescue from Cape Halkett to St Michael Alaska after their ship was crushed by the ice pack. Great reading.

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Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #240 on: June 19, 2016, 06:07:57 PM »
What things made them stay, briefly is okay? It's nearly unimaginable to remain, try and get through considering the hardships and dangers, toils those folks faced.

My father had a client named Faro Caudill, he settled in Pie Town Nm during the depression. There are a series of photos taken of him and his family that are well known. He eventually moved to Albuquerque and retired as a trade union rep.
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Offline pap11y

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #241 on: June 19, 2016, 07:59:21 PM »
I have just started this.. Great illustration and a bit of inspiration for me to get back out there to play :)


Offline Trekster

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #242 on: June 20, 2016, 12:53:14 PM »
I'm slowly reading through the Third Edition ARRL Ham radio license manual.
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Offline Trekster

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #243 on: June 20, 2016, 12:57:56 PM »
It's been years (over a decade) since I transmitted on a Ham radio and it appears that technology has very much progressed since then. I'm not very electronics savvy other than computers and cellphones. I do have a couple of Baofeng 2016 UV6r handhelds and I put a 15" whip on one but I only use them for police scanners currently. Trying to get all this technical data into my head feels like packing my head full of wool. It's not just the metric system. I probably understand that better than most people my age. It's the numbers. I hate math and numbers and terminology. I'm math retarded.
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Offline Orbean

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #244 on: June 21, 2016, 02:44:56 PM »
I am over half way through THE WORST HARD TIME by Timothy Egan.  It is the story and recorded true account of many of those who remained in the heart of the Dust Bowl during the absolute worst conditions one could possibly imagine.  Many people gave up and left, like the mythical Joad family in Steinbeck's novel THE GRAPES OF WRATH, but this is the true story of those that stayed!   It's hard to read about the unbelievable hardship, desperation, and decade-long incessant weather conditions, but almost impossible to put down!  I highly recommend it. :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Just picked up a copy, hastings had a sale on used books, five for twenty five dollars. Looking forward to reading it
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #245 on: June 21, 2016, 03:54:27 PM »
I am now reading "96 Years in the Black Hills" by Frank Thomson.  Thomson's biographical account of his life in the Spearfish SD area.  A lot of interesting material on the problems and frustrations of a ranchers life in the depression era along with the years after WWII.  Thomson adds a lot of his thoughts about the monetary system and the corruption of the political system.  He would fit right in today.

The most interesting part to me has been the cattle and sheep programs the federal government established to deal with the problems ranchers and farmers were having trying to survive on their farms.  Dust storms, farm crop prices, loans from the bank, land prices are all covered.  He paints a dismal picture of the day to day life of the average man in these times in western South Dakota.  Land sold for a $1.00 an acre with few takers.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline wolfy

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #246 on: June 21, 2016, 04:16:28 PM »
Sounds like a good read, but I'm not sure I could take two books on that subject, back to back. :'(

I'll make a note of it for later, though. :thumbsup:
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Offline wissahickon

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #247 on: June 21, 2016, 05:04:16 PM »
I got a good haul of books for Father's Day and I started the pile with Tom Brown Jr.'s Field Guide, Wilderness Survival.  My three year old picked it out, apparently. 

My dad used to have The Tracker by TB and I always thought it was cool when I was a kid.  I don't know much about the guy, aside from him having been sued for "tracking" the wrong guy at one point.  Hopefully I didn't subconsciously retain much from that book. 

This book, so far, seems to be a pretty good read.  I'm sure it's already on a lot of your radars but for those who haven't heard of it:

It focuses on survival when no tools are available.  All the usual topics are covered (shelter, fire, water, food, etc).  His anecdotes are fairly hokey but they keep the reading a bit less monotonous than a lot of similar books on the topic.  Typically the anecdotes cover mistakes he made while learning the skills described and they help to explain what Brown considers to be the common slip-ups a reasonable person would make. 

As an added bonus, TB apparently learned most of what he's teaching very near my home making the information provided especially relevant for my needs. 

One downside is that the info covered in the book has, for the most part, been beaten into the dirt by pretty much every bushcraft book written since its publication (1983).  Granted, this has nothing to do with the quality of the book and is certainly not Brown's fault but if the first few pages of his writing leave you with a bad taste in your mouth, there's nothing here that can't be found in a thousand other presentations. 

On the positive side, the writing is clear and informative.  It's more thorough than a lot of books out there these days (that seem to be published just to keep the author's name out there), it doesn't operate under the assumption that you're loaded with tools, and the illustrations are excellent.  Aside from being much nicer to look at than, say, Mors Kochanski's (Northern) Bushcraft, the quality of the illustrations leaves the reader with little doubt as to what the heck the author is talking about. 

Overall, a pretty good read (so far) though it's nothing that can't be found elsewhere. 


Offline Trekster

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #248 on: June 21, 2016, 07:03:05 PM »
I just printed out a few of my Expedients/X files pdfs and put em in a three ring binder. I've read through a few of em.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #249 on: June 21, 2016, 09:35:02 PM »
I am now reading "96 Years in the Black Hills" by Frank Thomson.  Thomson's biographical account of his life in the Spearfish SD area.  A lot of interesting material on the problems and frustrations of a ranchers life in the depression era along with the years after WWII.  Thomson adds a lot of his thoughts about the monetary system and the corruption of the political system.  He would fit right in today.

The most interesting part to me has been the cattle and sheep programs the federal government established to deal with the problems ranchers and farmers were having trying to survive on their farms.  Dust storms, farm crop prices, loans from the bank, land prices are all covered.  He paints a dismal picture of the day to day life of the average man in these times in western South Dakota.  Land sold for a $1.00 an acre with few takers.

Bet is that it is 4-6K now, or more.

Not that I am complaining or making a statement. But that land is worth a lot more now... I would think. He just lived in a different time. His "heirs" might not be saying the same thing.
;)


Sounds like a good read though. :) Kind of the type of stuff I like to read. Real stuff.
;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)