Author Topic: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL  (Read 21585 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« on: September 18, 2013, 07:05:55 PM »
Here's a basic recipe for a Bisquick-type mix that we mix up to take on Boy Scout camping weekends.  Way cheaper than boxed Bisquick and very good, too!  It makes a pretty large quantity, but it originally came from some Scouting publication long since lost to the mists of time ???

I will list the basic recipe first, and then come back in future posts in this thread to tell you what quantities of other ingredients to mix with it to make things other than basic biscuits.  The batches are pretty big because it is meant for a Boy Scout Troop, but you can feed a bunch of folks at a weekend group camp or use your calculator to cut them down in size for smaller amounts.

BASIC MIX:

5 pounds all-purpose flour

2 1/4 cups dry milk

3/4 cups baking powder

1/2 cup sugar

3  tablespoons salt

2  pounds vegetable shortening

Mix all of the dry ingredients together thoroughly in a large bowl.   Add the shortening & cut it into the dry ingredients until it is a uniform mealy or crumbly consistency.  Store at room temperature in a tightly covered container.


I'll start off with....

BASIC BISCUITS:

3 Cups basic mix

3/4 Cup water

Form into biscuits.  Place in preheated Dutch oven, on a hot rock, in a reflector oven, twisted onto a preheated stick or bake like a bannock in a skillet tipped toward the fire to brown the top.  Takes about 10-15 minutes in my Dutch & reflector ovens.


I'll be back with more......I promise O:-)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Dano

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 5009
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2013, 07:34:37 PM »
Dang Wolfy, Thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Offline wsdstan

  • Supporting Member
  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8733
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2013, 08:09:06 PM »
Thanks Wolfy, this will be just what I need for some new ideas.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8266
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #3 on: September 18, 2013, 08:30:57 PM »
  Have you got a tip for an easy way to cut two pounds of crisco into five pounds of flour ?     :stir:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2013, 09:36:36 PM »
  Have you got a tip for an easy way to cut two pounds of crisco into five pounds of flour ?     :stir:
Well, all I can tell you is I used an old potato masher in one hand and a pastry cutter in the other......seemed to get the job done ???    It works pretty well, actually O:-)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2013, 10:33:03 PM »
+1 on the pastry cutter. I'd be lost without mine.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8266
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2013, 07:07:24 AM »
  Have you got a tip for an easy way to cut two pounds of crisco into five pounds of flour ?     :stir:
Well, all I can tell you is I used an old potato masher in one hand and a pastry cutter in the other......seemed to get the job done ???    It works pretty well, actually O:-)

  Well,  that wouldn't work for me,  this is totally unrelated but you know how that works,  you gots to tell your story when it's there or you loose it.
  Potato mashers are one of those kitchen tools that are personal,  if you get one that works good for you it becomes precious and extremly valuable,  I had such a masher for about 40 years,  it was heavy duty, had wood scales like a fine knife,  and the design of it's business end was fantastic.
  About seven years ago we did our kitchen over,  new appliances, new cabinets, fresh paint on the walls,  and a new awning window put in over the sink,  everything was perfect,  except that when we unpacked our boxes of kitchen stuff (had to pack it in boxes to take down the old cabinets) we never found our cherished potato masher. :'(
  I bought a few since then,  used them once or twice then threw them out,  it seems all they're making these days is for looks and not for actually working,  I still have hopes that it's hiding somewhere in the storage room waiting to be found,  until then I continue to use my old fathful pastry cutter to do double duty.
 Actually it does a pretty good job of mashing,  but it could use a bit longer handle.   :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2013, 09:07:44 AM »
...  I had such a masher for about 40 years,  it was heavy duty, had wood scales like a fine knife,  and the design of it's business end was fantastic.
  ...

Like you, I've been forced to use newer, 'improved' potato mashers over the years. But this is my ol' standby. I inherited it from my mother. I just used it yesterday to crush grapes for jelly.

I also use it to crush dried eggshells for my chickens.

Sorry for the derail....




I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2013, 10:23:54 AM »
Over the years, I have been on a quest to find the article involving making bread, using the flour sack as the mixing bowl.

I though it came from a cook book by Bradford Angier,( he has many)......the book in question was from the local library, described the process.
Don't have a name, and they actually tossed it out, as I was the only one that had checked it out for years......wish I could have gotten it.

The idea was to take your flour sack, make a bowl in the inside, add the other ingredients, mixing in the flour until you have a ball of bread dough.......It would only take as much flour as it needed.

Seems I may have missed the part of having the dry ingredients per mixed as described....Maybe?...

But thanks for posting...... this seems like a good possibility. 
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2013, 10:45:26 AM »
You know, I remember reading that, too! You must be an old phart, too ;D   I never did try it, but I do remember the process.  First you make a well in the rolled down flour sack, pour in the liquid ingredients (my recollection says it was a cup of sourdough), then stir that around in one direction with a clean stick or your finger until the wad of dough adhering to the stick reverses direction, then reach in and pull the wad off the stick, turn it over a couple of times until it's well covered with flour and no longer 'sticky'.  Dust a board with flour, then remove the wad from the sack and knead enough flour into the wad to make the dough the proper consistency for your bread or biscuits. :shrug:

                                                                    :tent:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2013, 10:59:47 AM »
Yeah, dirt is too new for me.....
We tried many of versions at rendezvous, but always ended up putting it into a bowl.
Kinda worked.

The idea was to avoid bringing a the bowl.

I have purchased many of the books written by Bradford Angier, checked out many more, actually all that the local library has, including the satellites....no luck.

......some of the books I bought were from libraries all over, that some one had salvaged and sold them on the interweb......somet imes paid more for shipping than the book.

Some day some one will say, ....Oh yeah, I know what you are taking about....it's in "Thus and such" book....LOL
Good to know I'm not the only old phart, that as a "recollect" of that process.
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2013, 11:13:19 AM »
It's possible that old Bradford was just a pre-Internet bullschidter, conjured the whole technique in his own mind, knew it wouldn't work and is now looking down and laughing at all of us who actually try it! :lol:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2013, 11:34:26 AM »
LOL, guess I never thought of it that way.....as an outdoorsman, (that what they called us and them, back then), and of course many of my outdoorsy friends have been known to stretch the truth a mite......generally when ink-a-hall has been involved.....The perfect gag.......LOL

Oh well, the quest continues....One must have a quest.
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2013, 12:15:27 PM »
You know, I remember reading that, too! You must be an old phart, too ;D   I never did try it, but I do remember the process.  First you make a well in the rolled down flour sack, pour in the liquid ingredients (my recollection says it was a cup of sourdough), then stir that around in one direction with a clean stick or your finger until the wad of dough adhering to the stick reverses direction, then reach in and pull the wad off the stick, turn it over a couple of times until it's well covered with flour and no longer 'sticky'.  Dust a board with flour, then remove the wad from the sack and knead enough flour into the wad to make the dough the proper consistency for your bread or biscuits. :shrug:

                                                                    :tent:
The tricky part of this bag method, rather than measured flour, is getting your leavening ingredient in, if you're using one (yeast, or salt, or soda, etc.). But it works fine for frybread, or hardtack.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #14 on: September 19, 2013, 12:34:51 PM »
You know, I remember reading that, too! You must be an old phart, too ;D   I never did try it, but I do remember the process.  First you make a well in the rolled down flour sack, pour in the liquid ingredients (my recollection says it was a cup of sourdough), then stir that around in one direction with a clean stick or your finger until the wad of dough adhering to the stick reverses direction, then reach in and pull the wad off the stick, turn it over a couple of times until it's well covered with flour and no longer 'sticky'.  Dust a board with flour, then remove the wad from the sack and knead enough flour into the wad to make the dough the proper consistency for your bread or biscuits. :shrug:

                                                                    :tent:
The tricky part of this bag method, rather than measured flour, is getting your leavening ingredient in, if you're using one (yeast, or salt, or soda, etc.). But it works fine for frybread, or hardtack.
Of course, that would be no problem at all if one were using the recipe in the OP at the top of the thread 8)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #15 on: September 19, 2013, 12:41:42 PM »
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough).

Gonna make a lot of dough (get it?, dough), if I ever figure it out....Just think, make and sell videos, become the Wolfgang Puck of the Woods....TV shows, get to drink with Cathy Lee and Hoda ........WOW.
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #16 on: September 19, 2013, 12:50:12 PM »
Then I pray you never figure it out :-\.   Becoming a raging wino is no aspiration to greatness! O:-)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #17 on: September 19, 2013, 12:50:48 PM »
Okay, here's my no-fail Italian bread recipe. It's really hard to mess it up, and slight variations only change the texture a bit.

2 1/4 tsp bread yeast
3 cu flour (I use unbleached 'white' flour)
1 tsp sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1 1/3 cu water

Mix into a soft ball. Rather than risk getting too much flour in the mix, I oil my hands (olive, or veggie) when handling sticky dough. Let this sit in an oiled bowl until about double in size. Knock it down and knead for about 10 minutes on a lightly floured, or oiled surface.

If you're making it at home, and are lazy like me, use your bread machine to do the 1st rise and kneading. Then pull out the dough (remember the oil on the hands?) and place it in a conventional bread pan.

Place the dough in your bread pan, D.O., whatever.  I sometimes use special French or baguette pans for long sandwich loaves. Let this second rising continue in a warm place until again about double in size, or the shape of the desired finished loaf.

Bake in a preheated oven at 350oF for 30-35 minutes, or until golden on top and hollow sounding when you tap on it.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #18 on: September 19, 2013, 01:07:03 PM »
That sounds good to me, too! :drool: :cheers:

P.S.   We like using unbleached flour, too.....I think it helps the texture of the bread a little. :shrug:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #19 on: September 19, 2013, 01:11:26 PM »
That sounds good to me, too! :drool: :cheers:
It's a good 'take out' recipe. Mix the dry ingredients in a gallon ziploc bag, then just add your water at your destination.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #20 on: September 19, 2013, 01:24:40 PM »
That sounds good to me, too! :drool: :cheers:

P.S.   We like using unbleached flour, too.....I think it helps the texture of the bread a little. :shrug:

If anybody researches how they "bleach" flour, they'd switch, too!
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8266
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #21 on: September 19, 2013, 02:27:38 PM »
...  I had such a masher for about 40 years,  it was heavy duty, had wood scales like a fine knife,  and the design of it's business end was fantastic.
  ...

Like you, I've been forced to use newer, 'improved' potato mashers over the years. But this is my ol' standby. I inherited it from my mother. I just used it yesterday to crush grapes for jelly.

I also use it to crush dried eggshells for my chickens.

Sorry for the derail....



   Oh my god,  that's my masher,  hopefully I'll find it someday.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #22 on: September 19, 2013, 02:39:27 PM »

   Oh my god,  that's my masher,  hopefully I'll find it someday.

Actually the handle is baklite. If you don't want to wait until yours rematerializes, try this link:

http://www.ebay.com/bhp/flint-potato-masher

or this one:

http://www.etsy.com/search?q=Flint%20potato%20masher&view_type=gallery&ship_to=US

Or get a new one from China - sold under the Ekco brand

http://www.amazon.com/Ekco-1094559-Potato-Masher-Stainless/dp/B005JB45TW/ref=sr_1_7?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1379623112&sr=1-7&keywords=potato+masher
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #23 on: September 19, 2013, 03:08:31 PM »
THREAD DERAIL :soap: :pissed: :sarcasm:



Actually, I don't care at all & welcome them, actually O:-).    It seems to be a problem for all of us in the 'Olde Phart's Club'.........age-acquired A.D.D, I guess :P.   Have fun, boys! :banana: :banana: :banana: :cheers:      I'll get the train back on the track later on, when I introduce another use for the basic mix in the flour barrel. O:-)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #24 on: September 19, 2013, 03:28:55 PM »
THREAD DERAIL :soap: :pissed: :sarcasm:



Actually, I don't care at all & welcome them, actually O:-) .    It seems to be a problem for all of us in the 'Olde Phart's Club'.........age-acquired A.D.D, I guess :P .   Have fun, boys! :banana: :banana: :banana: :cheers:      I'll get the train back on the track later on, when I introduce another use for the basic mix in the flour barrel. O:-)

It's all Moe's fault! He did it!  I can't help it if all the Ol' Phart kitchen tools are the same vintage, and look alike!   :P
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2013, 03:32:20 PM »
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #26 on: September 19, 2013, 05:09:40 PM »
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.

Now that would make one more ingredient ...Milk....that could be included in the dry mix...so all you have to carry liquid would be the water.......
Good stuff thanks.
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #27 on: September 19, 2013, 05:14:42 PM »
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.

Now that would make one more ingredient ...Milk....that could be included in the dry mix...so all you have to carry liquid would be the water.......
Good stuff thanks.
No worries.....the basic baking recipe in the O.P. includes dry milk O:-)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #28 on: September 19, 2013, 06:16:22 PM »
That's kinda what I was getting at, ....a premix of dry ingredients, (tried that, mixed results), then just add liquid and lard...(or sourdough)....

Rule of Thumb when developing your own dry mix:

1/4 cu powdered milk to 1 cu water makes milk for baking. For example, if your recipe calls for 1 1/2 cu milk, add 6 TBs of powdered milk to your dry mix.

Now that would make one more ingredient ...Milk....that could be included in the dry mix...so all you have to carry liquid would be the water.......
Good stuff thanks.
No worries.....the basic baking recipe in the O.P. includes dry milk O:-)

First thing I noticed! I was just giving a ratio, for different volumes. Good recipe, BTW!
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #29 on: September 19, 2013, 06:22:55 PM »
That was an FYI directed toward Hunter63, Ol' P......and 'Thank you'! :)



Stay tuned.....I'm digging out the pancake recipe, next.  :drool:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #30 on: September 19, 2013, 07:09:08 PM »
PANCAKES USING BASIC BAKING MIX


OK, as promised, here's the next installment in the series of recipes utilizing the mix at the top of the thread. 


5 Cups Basic Mix

3 Eggs

3 Cups Water

Bake on inverted, lightly greased Dutch oven lid, griddle or frying pan until edges start to dry & bubbles begin to break on the surface of the pancake, flip & serve hot, immediately as they come from the griddle with butter, real maple syrup or dusted with powdered sugar.  Add blueberries to the pancakes as you pour them for a real treat.   This recipe makes a LOT of pancakes, so you will probably want to cut it down a bit.
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #31 on: September 19, 2013, 07:42:46 PM »
It's possible that old Bradford was just a pre-Internet bullschidter, conjured the whole technique in his own mind, knew it wouldn't work and is now looking down and laughing at all of us who actually try it! :lol:

OMG! I started looking for my Angier books, and then got online to see if any were still available.
"On Your Own in the Wilderness" by Angier and Whelan is selling USED for $187.00! 
A new (condition), hardbound edition is for sale for a hair over $2300.00! 
Us ol' pharts might be sitting on a gold mine of old books....

Sorry, Wolfy....derail #2.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6789
  • Minnesota
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2013, 09:40:21 PM »
My Great Aunt lived two blocks down from us , when we lived in a small town in Ia.  The house she lived in was the old farmplace house they had moved to town, just a year before I was born.  Her father built this house and he had migrated from Holland.   Her mother ( I guess that would be my great grandmother come to think of it...)   gave her instructions on how she wanted her kitchen to be.     

In the counter was two large pull out bins from counter top to the floor, you couldnt tell it was a pull out and that it tipped outwards.  She kept a 50# bag of flour in one.  She said the other used to be for 50# of sugar..but she didn't buy that much sugar at that time. Since it was just her and my Uncle Coon who was wheelchair bound.  But her as a child remembers both bins having huge bags of flour/sugar.

She'd still buy the flour in the big bag. The grocerman had to bring it in and put it into this pull out bin.   My aunt would open it out..open the bag and plop in the liquid or eggs and moosh them around with her hands right on top of the flour.  On top of the counter was a  butcher block ready for her to knead the bread or noodles once they got sticky.   Just behind this block was another longer pull/tip out bin that was about two feet long and against the backdrop.  This was for the wrapped bread loaves to stay in after being baked.

Next to this pull out bin was this deeeeep drawer.. it was sectioned off inside.  She had a large bag of cornmeal in one, and her smaller baking powder ect.  She said those used to come in larger bags back in the day.   The next section used to have coffee bean bags in it.  But when I knew her she just had a can of coffee grounds in that section. And one section had her blocks of lard which was in a lidded coffee can in it.  This was moved to the fridge in the summer time.   And I for some reason remember a waxed paper wrapped block of yeast.. I think that stayed in the drawer too.  She'd wedge a piece off to put into a glass of warm water. 

I used to get to do the mooshing as long as I would go get the pile of JC Penny or Wards catalogs for myself to stand on.  This bin was BIG..and I had all I could do to look over it and get my hand down with the wooden spoon to reach the top of the flour.   And for the spoon.. you use the handle...not the bowl part for mooshing (swirling).

When she passed away in the late 80's , she was in her 90's.  She was still using her 1930 something refrigerator and the TV which she hated to turn on still had the tubes in it.  It took five mins for it warm up before the black and white picture showed up. 

Anyway..another 'thread drift'..but this post brought in fond memories of Aunt Bert and her bread baking.   My Grandmother (Aunt Berts sister) lived across the alley from us and when those two started baking bread (my grandmother made buns for the church)  that end of town smelled GOOOOOOD... :)   

WW.


On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #33 on: September 19, 2013, 09:58:37 PM »
Like I said, Marcia, I don't mind derails in my threads......it's more like sittin' around the campfire and just feeling comfortable in visiting about things that we all enjoy or remember.   In this case, I was enthralled with your story because I remember a 'kitchen cabinet', as my mother called it, out on the farm that was much the same as what you described!

Thanks for the memory AND the great post!
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #34 on: September 20, 2013, 09:31:31 AM »
That was an FYI directed toward Hunter63, Ol' P......and 'Thank you'! :)



Stay tuned.....I'm digging out the pancake recipe, next.  :drool:

I noticed that milk and appreciate the ratio info....just thinking out loud.....
Thanks.

Guess I haven't looked for B. Angier's books lately.....that funny they are so much........
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16277
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #35 on: September 20, 2013, 09:39:02 AM »
...
Guess I haven't looked for B. Angier's books lately.....that funny they are so much........
His "How to Stay Alive in the Woods", reprinted 1st Ed in 2001, is only $13.00. That's one of the first books I got, back in the '60's. Don't know what it's worth.
I only do what the voices in my wife's head tell her to tell me to do.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8266
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #36 on: September 20, 2013, 10:05:55 AM »
...
Guess I haven't looked for B. Angier's books lately.....that funny they are so much........
His "How to Stay Alive in the Woods", reprinted 1st Ed in 2001, is only $13.00. That's one of the first books I got, back in the '60's. Don't know what it's worth.

  That's the one I have,  Green and orange rubber coated cover.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline hunter63

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2210
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #37 on: September 20, 2013, 10:25:45 AM »
WW, it's good see another reference to mixing in the bag.
The description of the kitchen is what I remember growing up, with the bins and all.....House built around 1900.
Thanks for the memories.

Was remodeled in the early '60 with all "New" cabinets....but some of the drawers, I saved and are in use to this day on a work bench.
Geezer Squad, Evoking the 50 year old rule..First 50 years, worried about the small stuff, second 50 years....Not so much

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #38 on: September 20, 2013, 07:13:30 PM »
MUFFINS USING BASIC BAKING MIX

OK, here's the additions to make muffins for breakfast or a coffee break....


3 Cups Basic Mix

1/4 to 1/3 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Mix everything together and divide & pour into 16-20 heavy foil/paper cupcake papers or regular cheapo cupcake papers if you have a muffin tin.  Add whatever you like to add to the muffin batter that you like.  The boys like chocolate chips.  The leaders liked grated lemon or orange zest, chopped pecans, raisins, craisins etc.......anything you can dream up, actually.   Bake for around 20-25 minutes in your pre-heated Dutch oven or reflector oven.  Serve hot with butter or margarine.
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8266
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #39 on: September 20, 2013, 07:50:46 PM »
MUFFINS USING BASIC BAKING MIX

OK, here's the additions to make muffins for breakfast or a coffee break....


3 Cups Basic Mix

1/4 to 1/3 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Mix everything together and divide & pour into 16-20 heavy foil/paper cupcake papers or regular cheapo cupcake papers if you have a muffin tin.  Add whatever you like to add to the muffin batter that you like.  The boys like chocolate chips.  The leaders liked grated lemon or orange zest, chopped pecans, raisins, craisins etc.......anything you can dream up, actually.   Bake for around 20-25 minutes in your pre-heated Dutch oven or reflector oven.  Serve hot with butter or margarine.

   I like that one.   :drool:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #40 on: September 20, 2013, 10:08:33 PM »
COOKIES USING BASIC BAKING MIX

My wife bakes a lot of these at our muzzleloader shoots and rendezvous.  Keeps all the kids in camp happy, gives them something to do and they learn how to do something useful at the same time.  It also makes her wildly popular!   

3 Cups Basic Mix

1 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1/4 Cup Water

1/2 Cup Vegetable Shortening

1 Teaspoon Flavoring (vanilla, lemon, peppermint, etc.)

You can add all kinds of other stuff to these cookies, too....like raisins, nuts, chocolate chips, M&Ms, etc.


You can just use as drop cookies or roll into a log and slice them off.  It makes a pretty good sized batch, but with kids around you'll have to mix up more. ;D.    Bake in a pretty hot preheated Dutch oven on a pizza pan or right on the oven bottom or a reflector oven shelf with a small cookie sheet for 10-15 minutes.
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Professor

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 454
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #41 on: September 21, 2013, 06:42:28 AM »
Thanks for this thread, Wolfy.  A few years ago, I was teaching ratio, proportion, and units conversion in my basic math class.  I had the idea of enlarging Betty Crocker's biscuit recipe into a "flour barrel" mixture. 

Obviously it was not a new idea, but here's what we came up with:
1 5-lb bag of flour
1/2 cup of baking powder
1 Tablespoon of salt
2 cups of dry milk powder
1 to 2 cups of Crisco or other shortening

I used a pastry blender to cut in the shortening.

The ratios of the two recipes vary a little.  I try to cut back on the shortening by using 1 cup.  The biscuits are not quite as tender, though.  For pancakes, I add a tablespoon of oil per cup of mix.


...and I'll see you soon!

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #42 on: September 21, 2013, 09:44:03 AM »
Long time, no see, Professor!.....& once again, I find myself in your debt for the valuable addition to one of my threads! 8)

As I said in the OP, the recipe I have came from some unknown Scouting-related, pre-internet source that one of our group of Scoutmasters came up with & handed out at one of our camp planning meetings.  I googled 'Bisquick Recipes' before starting the thread and find that there are lots of interpretations out there to choose from.  I decided to go with what we used because I knew that it worked and the 'group recipes' I'm bringing to this thread came with that faded, blue, MIMEOGRAPHED, (Whippersnappers will have to google that term ;D) & oil-spotted copy that I came across in my 'archives'. :-[
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline MnSportsman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6320
  • Just call me, JB, it is easier to type. ;)
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #43 on: September 21, 2013, 10:03:17 AM »
It occurred to me, when looking thru this topic, that it may be useful to explain to some folks,the difference between "all-purpose" plain flour & "self rising" flour.

So...for those who were not aware...
"Self rising" flour already contains baking powder & salt, while "All purpose" or plain flour does not.


Since it may be, that someone not knowing the difference, may try to mistakenly use "self rising" flour, rather than plain old "all purpose" flour & likely ruin their batch of mix. So if you try any recipes posted here, particularly the BASIC MIX used in the OP, and use self-rising flour, you are possibly going to be disappointed in the results of your efforts. Maybe not, but increasing the amount of salt & baking powder is also a waste of your ingredients.

Just a thought to share, that may be handy for some folks to know... Since not everyone is a "baker".


Have fun!
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #44 on: September 21, 2013, 10:10:08 AM »
Very true......and 'thanks', JB!





........but if you read the OP, I DID specify 'all purpose flour' 8)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8266
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #45 on: September 21, 2013, 10:30:57 AM »

  All this talk of Baking mix gave me a craving for biscuits,  so I made some and they turned out great,   I used 1-1/2 cups of All Purpose Flour,  2-tsp. of baking powder, 1-tsp. of baking soda, 1/2-tsp. of salt,  2-Tsp. of cold hard butter cut in sm. pieces and then cut into the flour,  and enough milk to form a soft dough.
  I used a little extra flour to be able to take the dough from sticky to dry enough to handle,  and I folded and turned the dough several times on a floured board,  then used a floured water glass to cut out round biscuits,  set into a 425F. oven until golden brown,  they puffed up and browned perfectly.

  Thanks everyone for the incentive.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline MnSportsman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6320
  • Just call me, JB, it is easier to type. ;)
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #46 on: September 21, 2013, 10:31:43 AM »
Yes wolfy, I read the OP... more than once, and it was part of why I posted about the difference. I also searched the topic to make sure I wasn't repeating anyone else. ;)
   Long ago, my sons were taught the difference, after making the mistake of bringing home "self rising", after asked to pick up plain "all purpose". or vice versa.. I don't remember which. But the reason they gave us for their selection, was that the one they picked up was the "cheaper" brand. So, that was the one they grabbed from the shelf. It was not the type desired at the time for the recipe. So, based upon that experience, I thought it might be nice to make others aware of the differences. Some who read this that may be inexperienced in baking and food preps., decide to try the recipes here & go to pick up the flour to try, or just grab some "flour" to try this, make not know about those differences. Then possibly get a different result than the desired one.
 :) 


Just wanted to help.


Edit: yup... tried to correct some spelling/grammatical mistakes. I think I got it correct now
« Last Edit: September 21, 2013, 10:49:44 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #47 on: September 21, 2013, 10:42:31 AM »
.......and you did, JB!  Thank you!


I would also like to note that if you do a 'search' on here for 'bisquick', lots of Moe's posts will be highlighted!   That would be another good source of information concerning good tasting recipes utilizing THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL mix O:-)
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline kanukkarhu

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 5898
  • Canadian Woods Loafer & Certified Nobody
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #48 on: September 21, 2013, 10:46:42 AM »
Wuffy, you know I have the attention span of a gnat...

What was I going to say??? 

Oh yeah, I read the entire thread and enjoyed the thread drift stories - a lot.  I mean, that part about potato mashers was EXCEPTIONALLY moving... ;)   (Seriously, great stuff)

But I wanted to tell you that this great idea of a basic recipe and adding/modding it strikes me as "modular", useful and valuable.  I plan on taking your posts and putting them all together when your finished.  I kinda wish it was all together somewhere minus the driftage...

Good stuff.  Thanks heaps. :thumbsup:
What if you woke up today, with only the things you thanked God for yesterday?

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 18432
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: THE BASIC FLOUR BARREL
« Reply #49 on: September 21, 2013, 08:52:47 PM »
OK,KK, 8) here's the next recipe on the list using the Basic Baking Mix.....

COFFEE CAKE USING BASIC BAKING MIX

3 Cups Basic Mix

1 Cup Sugar

1 Egg

1 Cup Water

Blend this mixture and pour into your greased Dutch oven....a 12" is about perfect for this recipe.  Then in a seperate bowl mix together:

3/4 Cup Brown Sugar

4 Tablespoons Butter

2 Teaspoons Cinnamon

Sprinkle this topping as evenly as you can on top of the cake batter and bake in a moderately hot oven for around 30-40 minutes.  If you like chopped pecans, add these toward the last half of the baking period, as they tend to get a little too brown.  This is a 'coffee' cake, but it's pretty danged good with a tall glass of good cold milk, too! :thumbsup:

The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX