Author Topic: Emberlit Stove  (Read 1608 times)

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Offline treez

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Emberlit Stove
« on: December 12, 2013, 12:45:31 PM »
I think this might be my first review on here so bear with me.
Last winter I was looking for a small, collapsable stove that didn't loom too complicated and not too expensive. My searches led me to Emberlit.

www.emberlit.com

It comes in stainless steel and titanium. The titanium comes in two sizes. I have the stainless steel and it weighs just over 11oz, packs flat (1/4") and is 3.5"x 3.5" x 6" when set up. (Stainless version is $39.99)




I am not a backpacker or a hardcore bushcrafter. I do a lot of car camping and backyard bushcrafting/woodcrafting. Mainly I got out 3-4 times a year looking for and photographing reptiles, amphibians, and plants. So that and being a forester is my experience level.

Back to the Emberlit. This is a nice little stove has four slotted side and a bottom. It is designed so that the pieces fit together to make a very stable wood stove. The front face of it has an opening at the bottom where you feed in the fuel. This opening is nice because you can fit long pieces of wood and you just feed them in as they burn up.
You could also forgo the bottom piece and spread out the sides to make a nice wind block for a small fire if you wanted.
The slotted pieces fit together to make a strong enough base that you could easily put a large cast iron pot on it with no problem or worry of it collapsing. I actually stood on and it was fine. (I weigh 190-200lbs)









It as also designed so that the bottom plate is raised about an inch. So you can put this little Stove on top of a picnic bench and the feet are cool enough that it will not burn the picnic table.  Which I tested out as well.



Once you are done cooking the stainless steel plates cool off fairly quick and you can take it apart and slip it back into the plastic ziploc style bag it came with.

Getting a fire started in it is fairly easy, it has nice holes on the sides for air vents, and it can hold coals fairly well too. I have made soup, oatmeal, coffee, smores, and black beans and rice on it so far. Worked great. What I love about it is that it keeps the fire contained, cools quickly, easy to put together and take apart, and not that expensive. I do a lot of camping in bear country (TN, NC, WV) it it is nice being able to make a quick meal far from camp and utilize a minimal amount of wood.

All in all, I am very happy with it. It has cooked many meals over the past spring, summer, and fall. So far the issue I have had is some slight warping of the steel, but once you put the cross braces in, it isn't even an issue. I woul highly recommend it.

Offline greyhound352

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Re: Emberlit Stove
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2013, 12:49:53 PM »
I think you did a great job on your review and glad to hear you like the stove.

I was gifted one of the esbit emergency stoves and look forward to giving that model a try.
"Between every two pines is a doorway to a new world." John Muir

Offline U.W.

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Re: Emberlit Stove
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2013, 02:46:07 PM »
Nice review of a great product!


I've been rocking an Emberlit for a lot of years now.  They didn't come with a box, or bag, or cross-bars when I got mine.  I've of course made a bag, and cross bars for it since.  Fantastic little stoves IMO/E.  Glad to hear yours is treating you right.  Mine has been treating me right for some years now, and is no worse for the wear from it.


u.w.

Offline treez

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Re: Emberlit Stove
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2013, 07:08:55 PM »
Thanks! Yeah I really like mine. Fits nice in the pack. Going to try and get out with it this coming weekend.