Author Topic: Fuel stoves and lanterns question  (Read 5272 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« on: April 03, 2012, 07:04:30 AM »

  On most camping stoves and lanterns that use fuels such as Coleman fuel or White gas there is a filler cap,  the caps have washers or seals that appear to be made of some sort of gasket material that is obviously impervious to the fuel.
 The problem with these is that over time the get brittle and break and need to be replaced,  finding the parts for some of the more vintage stoves and lanterns is getting more difficult each year,  my question is,  as far as the washers go for sealing the filler cap,  will common O-rings do or would they be affected by the fuel,  and what other substitutes might work in a pinch.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2012, 08:34:45 AM »
O-ring should be fine if it is rated to be used near fuels, ( like gas lines/filters).
I have always made my own replacements out of cork gasket materials & also n a pinch out of inner-tube laid flat & cut to size/fit. But have only had to do that 2 times. I have 2 coleman lanterns & 2 coleman stoves ( the old green suitcase 2 burner types). Had them since the 70's too. Still going strong although a bit "used" looking.
 :)


BTW, I only used gasoline for mine for the last 20 years, & have not had a single problem since switching from white gas. But I also don't use them 'every day"... Much cheaper, & I empty them before storage.
 :)


EDIT: damn "I/i" button on this laptop... Arrggghh.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2012, 08:37:51 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2012, 11:23:23 AM »
O-ring should be fine if it is rated to be used near fuels, ( like gas lines/filters).
I have always made my own replacements out of cork gasket materials & also n a pinch out of inner-tube laid flat & cut to size/fit. But have only had to do that 2 times. I have 2 coleman lanterns & 2 coleman stoves ( the old green suitcase 2 burner types). Had them since the 70's too. Still going strong although a bit "used" looking.
 :)


BTW, I only used gasoline for mine for the last 20 years, & have not had a single problem since switching from white gas. But I also don't use them 'every day"... Much cheaper, & I empty them before storage.
 :)


EDIT: damn "I/i" button on this laptop... Arrggghh.

  Thanks,  I love those old Coleman camp appliances,  my lanterns are the 228e and 228f model two mantle jobs made in '58 and '69,  and I have a two and a three burner stove,  all of them have been well used on our camping trips over the years.
  The problem I'm starting to have is with the seals on the caps,  I'm thinking of ordering new single piece caps from Coleman's Old Town shop, the old style silk mantles are hard to come by these days also so I'll order some of those also, and maybe a couple of pump rebuilding kits as well.
 
 I had an O ring hanging around but it won't fit snug so I made a gasket out of leather and soaked in oil, it fit great and i had the lantern running for about twenty minutes this morning and it held the pressure ok.
 
  Thanks again.

 By saying "white gas" are you talking about regular no-lead auto gas ?
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 11:32:35 AM by Moe M. »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2012, 11:26:09 AM »
 double post
« Last Edit: April 04, 2012, 11:34:29 AM by Moe M. »
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Offline upthecreek

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2012, 05:16:07 PM »
I got an old single, and a real old double mantle lantern. I replaced both my filler seals with cork a couple years ago and they're still hanging in there just fine.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2012, 05:53:36 PM »
Just seemed to remember something as I read these posts. & "Leather" was mentioned...
Seems to me that the Pump seal to pump up the pressure was leather at one time. & a drop or two of oil should be dripped into there on occasion..
I can't remember, & if I can get a chance, I will go out & pull them old Colemans out & see if one of them is still leather..
Just seems to me I remember something about that..
 :-\
Geez I hate it when I can;t recollect things I used to know better than I do now..
??
LOL
For me, I think it is called Anhuesers.. not Alheimers... Or CRS...somethin like that. Can't remember that either.
;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline wolfy

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2012, 08:20:40 PM »
Yeah Mn, they're still leather.  One time my wife and I were out on a camping trip and our old Coleman double-mantle wouldn't pump up any pressure and I didn't have any other oil handy, so I just raised the hood on the truck and dropped a few drops off the dipstick onto the leather, worked it in, spread the skirt a little and put it back together......worke d like a champ.   Probably not the best oil to use on leather, but WTH....it worked 8)
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Offline Gryphon

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2012, 07:16:07 PM »
That was the beauty of those old machines: they worked and still work.  Field repairs were/are quick and easy with basically whatever you have on hand and the rest of the parts just never go bad unless it gets run over, falls off a cliff or is allowed to rust to nothingness.

I've used innertube myself.  I can see cork gasket working great...thats what it's designed for.

I've got a propane Coleman stove that was given to me for parts.  One 39 cent O ring and it's back in business.  I wrote the o-ring size in sharpie in case I ever need to get a new one.  Need to get me a white gas one again just for kicks and redundancy.  I like the multifuel flexibility.

When I was a kid, we lived in a few cabins of Dad's own build...no power or water.  Our old Coleman lantern was the light for the house.  I remember it hissing down and Dad would grumble as he got up to go pump up the lantern again! ~LOL~ 
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Offline Dano

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #8 on: April 07, 2012, 09:50:35 PM »
The best tip I can pass along is when storing it, drain the fuel, add a couple drops of oil to the seals and DON'T screw the caps all the way tight.  It will allow the seal to relax and expand and be in great shape for next season.

Wolfy- LOL I had to do the exact same thing once while cooking to get it to light LOL  Works good doesn't it?!

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2012, 09:50:49 PM »
Good info here about using cork and leather guys. Thanks for the reminder that it doesn't have to be rubber and modern stuff. Easy field maintainability is priceless.
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2012, 01:41:19 PM »
The best tip I can pass along is when storing it, drain the fuel, add a couple drops of oil to the seals and DON'T screw the caps all the way tight.  It will allow the seal to relax and expand and be in great shape for next season.

Wolfy- LOL I had to do the exact same thing once while cooking to get it to light LOL  Works good doesn't it?!

  Another important tip to those who have the old Coleman fuel or Duel Fuel lanterns and camp stoves,  we who have and use them know all too well about the things that cause them to be troublesome,  the fuel caps,  mantles,  generators, and pump gaskets.
  But I've now learned the hard way that there's one more devil in the closet,  it's in the font (fuel tank),  and it's part of the of the pressure system,  for those who have never taken the pump apart,  there's a rod inside the pump handle that has a brass end that comes to a needle point,  it's function is to close the off the check valve at the base of the pump,  in the check valve is a tiny ball,  it floats in the check valve,  when you pump air into the font it moves forward allowing air to flow into the tank. 
 When you raise the handle for the next pump the ball is forced up by the air in the tank and seals the valve trapping the air inside the tank,  over years of storage, especially if fuel is left in the tank,  varnish and grime builds on the ball and it gets frozen in the open position,  this allows all the air you pump into the tank to escape from the tank through the pump tube.
  If It gets stuck it's all most impossible to get the check valve out of the tank,  9 out of 10 tries will end up with a broken valve body,  then you have to buy a special extractor tool to get it out,  and new parts are very hard to find.
  To save yourself a lot of trouble,  before you store your liquid fuel lantern or camp stove for any long period of time you should take the pump system apart,  clean it, put a couple of drops of oil on the rubber or leather pump gasket,  AND,  unscrew the rod that's inside the pump handle,  look inside the pump tube, at the bottom you will see the check valve,  drop a drop or two of break fee into the center of the check valve and reassemble the pump system.
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2012, 05:20:22 PM »
& just an "add-on" , the old colemans like I have... which are not the new "silver" looking ones. I am talking about the old green ones. ( I had a red one once long ago, don't know where it went, but must of lost it in a move long ago.) Regardless, they all can use the unleaded gasoline, they just wanted you to buy the new silver ones that SAY dual fuel... ;) 
This includes the stoves.. btw...


But.. if you want to just use the expensive white gas... go right ahead.. :)


I have been using regular gasoline & the new "unleaded", in my old ones without modification for about, or at least, 20+ years, & never had an issue. {Although I do have some "white gas" that I use once n a while to clean some carb parts from 2 cycle engines. aware that lubrication of rubber based products exposed to it may be necessary...} ;)
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2012, 07:33:19 PM »
& just an "add-on" , the old colemans like I have... which are not the new "silver" looking ones. I am talking about the old green ones. ( I had a red one once long ago, don't know where it went, but must of lost it in a move long ago.) Regardless, they all can use the unleaded gasoline, they just wanted you to buy the new silver ones that SAY dual fuel... ;) 
This includes the stoves.. btw...


But.. if you want to just use the expensive white gas... go right ahead.. :)


I have been using regular gasoline & the new "unleaded", in my old ones without modification for about, or at least, 20+ years, & never had an issue. {Although I do have some "white gas" that I use once n a while to clean some carb parts from 2 cycle engines. aware that lubrication of rubber based products exposed to it may be necessary...} ;)

  I've always used Coleman fuel in my lanterns, stoves, and catalitic heaters, in the 'old days' it was because Coleman kind of insisted that it was the best,  when the auto industry went to lead free gas I did use it in my heaters but continue to use Coleman fuel in my lanterns a stoves because I'm not sure about cooking over or inhaling the burning additives that go into auto gasoline.

  But I've never head of anyone dying from gasoline smoke from a Coleman lantern.   :)
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2012, 07:43:23 PM »
Good point about "emissions", but I do not use the stoves very often, mostly the lanterns. So, our exposure was minimal. But gas does work, so I added it here in this thread for information purposes. I am not sure what the exhaust/emission difference might be, but haven't had any issues from/during the times we used them.
 :)
I have been told but have never tried it, that you can even use denatured alcohol in them also. Which is also more expensive.. Denatured alcohol is also used in marine stove applications too.
 :)
I did not mean for folks to change their habits, only to provide an alternative if the need arose.
 :D
It was good for you to point out the emissions possibility, as a possible concern.
 :thumbsup:
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Fuel stoves and lanterns question
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2012, 08:05:26 PM »
Good point about "emissions", but I do not use the stoves very often, mostly the lanterns. So, our exposure was minimal. But gas does work, so I added it here in this thread for information purposes. I am not sure what the exhaust/emission difference might be, but haven't had any issues from/during the times we used them.
 :)
I have been told but have never tried it, that you can even use denatured alcohol in them also. Which is also more expensive.. Denatured alcohol is also used in marine stove applications too.
 :)
I did not mean for folks to change their habits, only to provide an alternative if the need arose.
 :D
It was good for you to point out the emissions possibility, as a possible concern.
 :thumbsup:

 I don't think anyone took it that way,  knowing that it can be substituted is valuable info,  especially in survival situations,  downed electric lines after a major storm,  means no heat, hot water,  and cooking, sometimes for weeks,  a gallon of coleman fuel doesn't go very far if it's your main source of cooking and lighting.
  In a pinch after running out it's nice to know that being able to tap your car's tank for a couple of gallons to eat warm food and enjoy your coffee or tea by the glow of your lantern is a comforting thought.

  Thanks for the info.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.