Author Topic: Condor Kephart Knife field review  (Read 25054 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Condor Kephart Knife field review
« on: August 24, 2014, 12:49:06 PM »
  Last week I wrote a preliminary review of the Condor Kephart knife and my first impressions of the knife and leather sheath,  I said I would write up a field review after actually using the knife in a dirt time setting,  so here it is.

  I set up a small temporary camp in a wooded area by a small pond that is stocked several times a year with Rainbows, brookies, and browns,  it's on a 40 acre track of land that is owned by a R&G club that I've belonged to for about forty years.
 I set up my 5'x 7' tarp and collected a bit of fire wood,  got a fire going in the fire ring that I built there a few years ago, I made a pot hanger for my 1.1 liter Mor's Bushpot,  and put on a pot of water for coffee,  the weather was cool for this time of year and it was a very pretty couple of days.
 I cut a willow branch for a rod holder and put a line in the water and sat back with a try stick and the little Kepart,  I carved some notches,  made a tent stake,  cut a feather stick,  and whittled the bark off a couple of sticks to cook something on.
 I was lucky enough to catch a couple 12" Rainbows for lunch and the Kephart did a fine job of gutting, scaling, and processing the fish for cooking which wasn't all that fancy,  I seasoned them with a little salt, pepper, and a dash of Old Bay, then rested them open on the two sticks over the fire,  they were good eating.
 All in all the Kephart did a great job of doing the things I usually do in and around camp,  you'll notice I didn't say anything about batoning wood with the Kephart,  that's because I had my favorite old medium weight hawk made by the Hawken Shop before it sold out and moved from St.Louis and used that for splitting some wrist sized pieces of wood for the fire,  although I did use the kephart for splitting small pieces into kindling and it worked very well for that.
 I mentioned in my other thread that this knife is not a survival knife in that it's not built like a tank,  IMHO it would be up to getting you out of trouble in a survival situation as long as you use your head in what you ask of it.
 At this point I'd like to note that Condor did a great job of recreating the Kephart,  after receiving the knife I went back to my Books by Kephart and Nessmuck and read over their writings about their cutting tools,  both are of about the same opinion when it comes to knives,  Nessmuck didn't design his knife, it was a production off the shelf skinning knife that he bought and took a liking to,  Kephart did suggest that he designed his own knife,  but that may be a bit of a misstatement on his part, It's said that he told a blacksmith about what he wanted in a knife and left the rest to the maker, Kephart did write that he thought it was rather ugly looking, none of which is really important to this review.
 In spite of the differences in both their knives they did share the same opinion of how knives should be used,  none of which includes any real rough use such as botoning wood,  using them as choppers, or making spears out of them,  they used their knives to carve trap triggers,  game processing,  food prep, and eating with,  that's what the used their hatchets and saws for.
 Both describe the ideal belt knife as being about 4-1/2" inches of cutting edge (about Palm width) and having fairly thin blades,  while Nessmuck's knife was based on a butcher type blade, Kephart's knife is more of a hunting shaped blade,  in Kepharts writtings his knife is described as having a 4-1/2" blade and about the same length handle, the blade is 1/8" thick and tapering towards the point,  the Handel is made of hard wood, oval in shape,  measuring 3/4" at the pommel end and tapering to 1/2" where the grip meets the blade, with a 1/4" hump to act as a guard.
 In looking closely at the Condor it's apparent that it's not just close to Kephart's design,  Condor got it dead on,  what's most interest to me is that this little knife has changed the way I look at a woodsman's knife and probably how I will use my cutting tools in the future.

 In closing,  my opinion is that the Condor Kephart is a very good knife for it's intended purpose,  it's a general use sportsmans/woodsmans knife,  it's well made for it's price point, and well worth the money,  it won't replace a quality made custom in any way,  it's not a tactical or fighting knife,  and it's not a one tool option survival knife,  but it's up to the task of being a decent blade for the bushcrafter, hunter/fisherman,  or camp cook.   

 :cheers:
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2014, 01:10:01 PM »
Don't know what happened the first time I posted this  :shrug:

I've enjoyed what you shared about the knife in both threads. Excellent review!  :thumbsup:
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2014, 01:23:44 PM »
Don't know what happened the first time I posted this  :shrug:

I've enjoyed what you shared about the knife in both threads. Excellent review!  :thumbsup:

  Thanks Sarge,  I tried my best to give an honest review without trying to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.   
                      :shrug:
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Offline Spyder1958

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2014, 04:51:26 AM »
Thanks Moe, I enjoyed your review as well.
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Offline Professor

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2014, 05:56:56 AM »
Thanks for the review!  I like my Condor Kephart and plan to use it more now. 
...and I'll see you soon!

Offline Lamewolf

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2014, 07:20:50 AM »
I don't think Condor got the design spot on with the original Kephart, but they did get it close.  But it is a good design, I like mine !
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2014, 07:51:11 AM »
I don't think Condor got the design spot on with the original Kephart, but they did get it close.  But it is a good design, I like mine !

   All I have to go on in saying that Condor got it spot on is the sketch of Kephart's knife in his book and by the measurements he quoted,  I'd be interested in hearing where they differ.
   I don't know just how sophisticated Condors production methods and equipment are for making their knives,  but I suspect that a lot of the work is hands on using grinders by individual laborers,  and that each knife they put out is not exactally the same as the next, though I don't have anything to go by.
   On mine for instance,  looking down on the top of the knife point forward I can see that the right side of the blade tapers a little more than the left side from the tang where the grip meets the blade,  also the racaso is not ground identical on both sides,  and the pommel end of the wood scales have been ground flat at the end pin about the size of my thumb print,  it almost looks like they did it to accommodate a shorter brass pin,  in looking at the sketch in Kepharts notes his grip looks more rounded off at that point.
   But if you measure the length, width, thickness, and grip size on the Condor version everything matches the measurements quoted by Kephart himself.
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Offline Lamewolf

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2014, 09:50:28 AM »
I don't think Condor got the design spot on with the original Kephart, but they did get it close.  But it is a good design, I like mine !

   All I have to go on in saying that Condor got it spot on is the sketch of Kephart's knife in his book and by the measurements he quoted,  I'd be interested in hearing where they differ.
   I don't know just how sophisticated Condors production methods and equipment are for making their knives,  but I suspect that a lot of the work is hands on using grinders by individual laborers,  and that each knife they put out is not exactally the same as the next, though I don't have anything to go by.
   On mine for instance,  looking down on the top of the knife point forward I can see that the right side of the blade tapers a little more than the left side from the tang where the grip meets the blade,  also the racaso is not ground identical on both sides,  and the pommel end of the wood scales have been ground flat at the end pin about the size of my thumb print,  it almost looks like they did it to accommodate a shorter brass pin,  in looking at the sketch in Kepharts notes his grip looks more rounded off at that point.
   But if you measure the length, width, thickness, and grip size on the Condor version everything matches the measurements quoted by Kephart himself.

Take a look at the original Kephart at this site: http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/Kephart/onlineexhibit/outdoors/Hunting.htm
You will notice some minor differences in the handle and blade shape.  For one, the choil on the original is a rounded hump where the Condor has sharper angles, the handle is fatter on the original, and the edge profile is slightly different between the two of them.  Minor differences but still different for sure.
Lamewolf
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2014, 03:07:10 PM »
I don't think Condor got the design spot on with the original Kephart, but they did get it close.  But it is a good design, I like mine !

   All I have to go on in saying that Condor got it spot on is the sketch of Kephart's knife in his book and by the measurements he quoted,  I'd be interested in hearing where they differ.
   I don't know just how sophisticated Condors production methods and equipment are for making their knives,  but I suspect that a lot of the work is hands on using grinders by individual laborers,  and that each knife they put out is not exactally the same as the next, though I don't have anything to go by.
   On mine for instance,  looking down on the top of the knife point forward I can see that the right side of the blade tapers a little more than the left side from the tang where the grip meets the blade,  also the racaso is not ground identical on both sides,  and the pommel end of the wood scales have been ground flat at the end pin about the size of my thumb print,  it almost looks like they did it to accommodate a shorter brass pin,  in looking at the sketch in Kepharts notes his grip looks more rounded off at that point.
   But if you measure the length, width, thickness, and grip size on the Condor version everything matches the measurements quoted by Kephart himself.

Take a look at the original Kephart at this site: http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/Kephart/onlineexhibit/outdoors/Hunting.htm
You will notice some minor differences in the handle and blade shape.  For one, the choil on the original is a rounded hump where the Condor has sharper angles, the handle is fatter on the original, and the edge profile is slightly different between the two of them.  Minor differences but still different for sure.

    I did as you asked and you're right in that my condor kephart has some minor differences with the ones pictured on your suggested site,  but let me point out that there are differences between the advertised drawing and the actual knife pictured next to it.
    Also, I'm assuming that the actual knife pictured is Kephart's knife that he used,  it's clear that the edge profile on the drawing doesn't match the profile on the real knife,  probably because it's been well used and sharpened often,  so how is one supposed to tell what the actual edge profile was like when it was new.
    Another difference in the two knives pictured is at the guard,  the drawing shows a clear crescent shaped scallop coming off the guard and all the way up to the tang,  the actual knife doesn't have that feature.
    The grips on both knives are shaped differently,  the difference is minor,  but it's still there.

   My point being,  if the actual maker that was offering the knife at the time couldn't get it exactly right,  how can anyone expect Condor to make an exact copy from two examples that don't even match each other,  This is my first Condor knife so I'm far from being a loyal fan,  I gave my impression and review of their Condor Kephart,  I based it on it's quality of materials and build,  on how it worked in field use,  on it's adherence to the original Kepart design,  and finally Condors price point,  all of which exceeded my expectations.
   The bottom line is that apparently you are stuck on a few very minor details that to you feel are  important enough to argue about,  to me, they are not,  my example of the knife looks enough like the original to satisfy my expectations,  the measurements given by Kephart match mine exactally,  again close enough for government work.
   I wasn't expecting a custom made high quality exact replica of a historical artifact and I didn't get one, so I wasn't disappointed,  I did however get a exceptional rendition of Horace Kepharts favorite knife,  which in my opinion is a great little all around light duty camp knife especially suited to game and food processing and prep. which from Kepharts own writtings and backed up by Nessmucks own hand is what they used their belt knives for.
                                                                         :shrug:

  BTW,  I have both Kepart's and Nessmuck's books,  both can be a bit boring,  but well worth the money and the reference material.    :thumbsup:
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Offline Draco

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2014, 03:28:24 PM »
Thanks for the update Moe.  I might have to toss the one that is on my Amazon wish list into the cart. 

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2014, 09:39:51 AM »
  Moe, I just found this topic. I was waiting for the other one to pop up with your field review, so this one apparently escaped me until just now.
My regret is that I did not see this one sooner than just now. I would have changed some of my plans earlier in the week just due to this topic.


  You see...I ordered a Condor Kephart from Amazon that very Saturday shortly after reading your initial post that you were testing the one you had purchased. I have become a fan of spear point knives for some reason in the past few years, & when I had Mario make a knife for me & then later, my oldest son; I asked him to modify the knife he was making for me to a spear point from his existing pattern. So seeing that this Kephart style was now available from Condor at such a reasonable price for both knife & sheath, I took the chance to get one, even though you had not yet given your field review. Since I thought your initial description was enough for me at the time, & I just didn't want to wait. LOL
;)


 Anyway, I was quite busy for the last week, plus this weekend, and even though I rec'd the knife on Tuesday last, I have not been able to do much more than look at the knife & sheath.


  I think that it is a bit narrower in the handle for "my" hands, but I will not know for sure until I do some of the things you did, in your field review. As compared with the Condor Bushlore and my custom from Mario, this Kephart seems to be somewhere in the middle as far as I am concerned, and will not replace the custom knife.. But I still think I will enjoy using this knife. Time will tell.
:)


Thanks again for your original mention of this knife, & Thanks much for your field review!
:thumbsup:
   
   P.S. - If I get the time today, I plan to get the knives out, hit the woods to mess around & see just what this Kephart might do & how it compares to the others. Not a replacement for anything I currently have, but, to be honest, I'm thinking the Condors will likely be passed onto my current grandsons when I pass, & the Custom to go to my youngest son. They can all fight over the rest of my crap if they like. LOL


Thanks again, Moe!
:)

I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #11 on: September 01, 2014, 06:38:05 PM »
  Moe, I just found this topic. I was waiting for the other one to pop up with your field review, so this one apparently escaped me until just now.
My regret is that I did not see this one sooner than just now. I would have changed some of my plans earlier in the week just due to this topic.


  You see...I ordered a Condor Kephart from Amazon that very Saturday shortly after reading your initial post that you were testing the one you had purchased. I have become a fan of spear point knives for some reason in the past few years, & when I had Mario make a knife for me & then later, my oldest son; I asked him to modify the knife he was making for me to a spear point from his existing pattern. So seeing that this Kephart style was now available from Condor at such a reasonable price for both knife & sheath, I took the chance to get one, even though you had not yet given your field review. Since I thought your initial description was enough for me at the time, & I just didn't want to wait. LOL
;)


 Anyway, I was quite busy for the last week, plus this weekend, and even though I rec'd the knife on Tuesday last, I have not been able to do much more than look at the knife & sheath.


  I think that it is a bit narrower in the handle for "my" hands, but I will not know for sure until I do some of the things you did, in your field review. As compared with the Condor Bushlore and my custom from Mario, this Kephart seems to be somewhere in the middle as far as I am concerned, and will not replace the custom knife.. But I still think I will enjoy using this knife. Time will tell.
:)


Thanks again for your original mention of this knife, & Thanks much for your field review!
:thumbsup:
   
   P.S. - If I get the time today, I plan to get the knives out, hit the woods to mess around & see just what this Kephart might do & how it compares to the others. Not a replacement for anything I currently have, but, to be honest, I'm thinking the Condors will likely be passed onto my current grandsons when I pass, & the Custom to go to my youngest son. They can all fight over the rest of my crap if they like. LOL


Thanks again, Moe!
:)

  Thanks for the mention Jeb,  I agree with you about the Condor Kephart not being a replacement for an existing knife and it certainly is not even comparable to one of Mario's customs,  I have one of his Adirondack model knives which is his take of a Nessmuck,  the quality and finish is outstanding.
  Perhaps I overstated the Condor Kephart,  it wasn't my intent to suggest that it was anything but an inexpensive all around utility camp knife and sportsmans knife,  as you know,  a big part of my woods bumming enjoyment revolves around cooking, small game hunting,  and fishing,  I'm not big on carving spoons and wood spirits,  and if I have to process wood for my fire or other camp chore I use a folding saw or a hand axe or hawk,  I have very little use for a big heavy knife,  I've had two BK-2's, a Rat-5, and a couple of other sharpened pry bars and got rid of all of them.
  I enjoy my "bushcraft" knives,  mainly a custom bushlore, two BHK Bushcrafters, my MLL Nessey, Fallkniven F-1,  and a few others of that size,  what I like about the Condor kephart that makes it special to me is that it's light, with very little stropping it takes a razor edge,  the thin blade slices like a laser,  so it's great for food prep,  and excellent for cleaning and processing fish and small game,  yet it'll slice thin ribbons on feather sticks and baton small pieces of wood into kindling,  ditto with cutting cordage.
  Of course all my expensive knives will do most of those chores,  but it bothers me to clean and scale fish or gut and chop up squirrels with one of my "pretty" knives,  or handing one over to someone so they can cut their steak in a USGI mess plate,  I don't mind doing any of those things with my Condor Kephart or my modified #2 Mora classic.
  If your main use for your belt knife food prep, processing game, skinning out hides, or skinning the bark off a roasting stick you're going to appreciate the Condor Kephart as much as I do,  if you use your knife to chop down trees,  not so much.    ;)
  One more thing about the Condor Kephart that is a big selling point for me that you don't find in most other inexpensive knives is that the scales are epoxied on before being pinned,  that means I don't have to worry about rust under the scales but more important is that no bacteria is going to grow under there that will transfer to my food when I cut veggies or slice up some cheese and summer sausage.
  While it may not be a bragging on knife,  it does have some things going for it that can grow on you.    :thumbsup:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #12 on: September 01, 2014, 09:40:28 PM »
Works for me. Moe.
 :)



And... When I bought it...I didn't even ask for approval, nor permission to buy it, from any of the other folks on here. Although they likely already disapprove. Some of them said it before... "Crappy & cheap".. But "I" disagree. It was "My decision & "My" money.
 ;)


It'll do... Better than some I have had in my hands. Regardless of "others" approval.


 ;)


P.S. - D.C. bought one & I just saw he even used it recently in a video about "feather sticks". Seems as though it was good enough for DC to buy one. Ain't he something?
LOL
 :D


 Edited. My dime. What you care?
« Last Edit: September 01, 2014, 09:59:16 PM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Punty

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2014, 01:55:22 PM »
  If your main use for your belt knife food prep, processing game, skinning out hides, or skinning the bark off a roasting stick you're going to appreciate the Condor Kephart as much as I do,  if you use your knife to chop down trees,  not so much.    ;)
 

  Love this line. +1

   It is so self evidently true, about most knives.

   It's the reason why I use a 2 knife system, a BK9 and a Mora Robust. Different tools, different jobs.

EDIT: By the way, I was carefully looking at those old ads for the Kephart knives, and noting the size of the handles relative to the blades. This is one of my biggest pet peeves in today's industry, they scale the handles with the size of the blade!  Don't they know that my hand is the same size whether it's holding a 9 inch blade or a 3 inch blade?
        Kephart knew. Look at those beautiful grips!
« Last Edit: September 02, 2014, 02:00:34 PM by Punty »
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Offline Lamewolf

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2014, 10:46:22 AM »
I don't think Condor got the design spot on with the original Kephart, but they did get it close.  But it is a good design, I like mine !

   All I have to go on in saying that Condor got it spot on is the sketch of Kephart's knife in his book and by the measurements he quoted,  I'd be interested in hearing where they differ.
   I don't know just how sophisticated Condors production methods and equipment are for making their knives,  but I suspect that a lot of the work is hands on using grinders by individual laborers,  and that each knife they put out is not exactally the same as the next, though I don't have anything to go by.
   On mine for instance,  looking down on the top of the knife point forward I can see that the right side of the blade tapers a little more than the left side from the tang where the grip meets the blade,  also the racaso is not ground identical on both sides,  and the pommel end of the wood scales have been ground flat at the end pin about the size of my thumb print,  it almost looks like they did it to accommodate a shorter brass pin,  in looking at the sketch in Kepharts notes his grip looks more rounded off at that point.
   But if you measure the length, width, thickness, and grip size on the Condor version everything matches the measurements quoted by Kephart himself.

Take a look at the original Kephart at this site: http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/Kephart/onlineexhibit/outdoors/Hunting.htm
You will notice some minor differences in the handle and blade shape.  For one, the choil on the original is a rounded hump where the Condor has sharper angles, the handle is fatter on the original, and the edge profile is slightly different between the two of them.  Minor differences but still different for sure.

    I did as you asked and you're right in that my condor kephart has some minor differences with the ones pictured on your suggested site,  but let me point out that there are differences between the advertised drawing and the actual knife pictured next to it.
    Also, I'm assuming that the actual knife pictured is Kephart's knife that he used,  it's clear that the edge profile on the drawing doesn't match the profile on the real knife,  probably because it's been well used and sharpened often,  so how is one supposed to tell what the actual edge profile was like when it was new.
    Another difference in the two knives pictured is at the guard,  the drawing shows a clear crescent shaped scallop coming off the guard and all the way up to the tang,  the actual knife doesn't have that feature.
    The grips on both knives are shaped differently,  the difference is minor,  but it's still there.

   My point being,  if the actual maker that was offering the knife at the time couldn't get it exactly right,  how can anyone expect Condor to make an exact copy from two examples that don't even match each other,  This is my first Condor knife so I'm far from being a loyal fan,  I gave my impression and review of their Condor Kephart,  I based it on it's quality of materials and build,  on how it worked in field use,  on it's adherence to the original Kepart design,  and finally Condors price point,  all of which exceeded my expectations.
   The bottom line is that apparently you are stuck on a few very minor details that to you feel are  important enough to argue about,  to me, they are not,  my example of the knife looks enough like the original to satisfy my expectations,  the measurements given by Kephart match mine exactally,  again close enough for government work.
   I wasn't expecting a custom made high quality exact replica of a historical artifact and I didn't get one, so I wasn't disappointed,  I did however get a exceptional rendition of Horace Kepharts favorite knife,  which in my opinion is a great little all around light duty camp knife especially suited to game and food processing and prep. which from Kepharts own writtings and backed up by Nessmucks own hand is what they used their belt knives for.
                                                                         :shrug:

  BTW,  I have both Kepart's and Nessmuck's books,  both can be a bit boring,  but well worth the money and the reference material.    :thumbsup:

I'm not arguing about the differences, just stating that there are differences.  And its ture, Kepharts actual knife edge and the one in the catalog drawing are different because his has been used and worn down through repeated sharpening through the years.  All I'm saying basically is that there are other Kephart renditions that are a lot closer to the original, but they are semi custom knives and cost a lot more.  And again, I do like my Condor Kephart really well !  I have several Condors and like them all, but I also have to say that my Kephart was the worst Condor product I have.  When I first got it, I think they forgot to sharpen it it !  It had some angle to it but was not sharp at all and it actually took some draw filing and lots of honing to get a good edge on it.  All my other Condors just required a little touchup on the edges and thats it, the Kephart would only cut the proverbial hot butter when it was new.  8)

By the way, I don't own a Nessmuk knife of any brand - just don't like the looks of them and they look like to me they are designed only as a skinner and nothing else.  But then the big hump on the back side of the point might make a last ditch spoon if need be ?  :crazy:
Lamewolf
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2014, 11:06:50 AM »
.......and some of them are so exaggerated they would make a passable ping-pong paddle! :shrug:
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2014, 03:35:27 PM »

   I wasn't expecting a custom made high quality exact replica of a historical artifact and I didn't get one, so I wasn't disappointed,  I did however get a exceptional rendition of Horace Kepharts favorite knife,  which in my opinion is a great little all around light duty camp knife especially suited to game and food processing and prep. which from Kepharts own writtings and backed up by Nessmucks own hand is what they used their belt knives for.
                                                                         :shrug:

  BTW,  I have both Kepart's and Nessmuck's books,  both can be a bit boring,  but well worth the money and the reference material.    :thumbsup:

I'm not arguing about the differences, just stating that there are differences.  And its ture, Kepharts actual knife edge and the one in the catalog drawing are different because his has been used and worn down through repeated sharpening through the years.  All I'm saying basically is that there are other Kephart renditions that are a lot closer to the original, but they are semi custom knives and cost a lot more.  And again, I do like my Condor Kephart really well !  I have several Condors and like them all, but I also have to say that my Kephart was the worst Condor product I have.  When I first got it, I think they forgot to sharpen it it !  It had some angle to it but was not sharp at all and it actually took some draw filing and lots of honing to get a good edge on it.  All my other Condors just required a little touch up on the edges and that's it, the Kephart would only cut the proverbial hot butter when it was new.  8)

By the way, I don't own a Nessmuk knife of any brand - just don't like the looks of them and they look like to me they are designed only as a skinner and nothing else.  But then the big hump on the back side of the point might make a last ditch spoon if need be ?  :crazy:

  LOL,  OK, "what we have here is a failure to communicate",  as in,  We ain't on the same page.

  I'm not sure what you expect out of an inexpensive knife made in South America, probably in a primitive factory (compared to US, Japanese, or Chinese knife works) known for being iffy on their quality control,  I my opinion they aren't up to custom or even semi custom quality.
  But the base materials they are using are not bad,  they on average from what I've seen and heard make satisfactory knives with a little bit of work,  Mine came in sharp enough to work with,  stripping the coating off the blade helped,  and stropping with a dab of compound had it shaving hairs off my arm,  in my book, if it looks good, cuts good, and is comfortable to work with,  it's a good knife,  mine after 30 minutes work is a good knife.
 But is it a fair representation of Kepharts design,  going by the picture of Kephart's actual knife, it is a close as I'd expect,  judging by the photo of an add selling Kephart knives during his time,  the two are not alike,  as far as I know those two images are the one used by Condor as the model for their knives,  but so has every knife maker in the industry, including the finest custom makers, so to say that one is a better likeness than the other is a bit subjective.
 When I look at the Kephart knife no matter who makes it,  I'm looking at it from a historical standpoint, same for the Nessmuck,  if you are going to compare either of the originals or close copies to those that custom makers are putting out in 3/16 thick 1095, 01 or 02 tool steel and wearing exotic wood scales, it's an unfair comparison,  and they aren't true replications of the original.
 You suggested that Nessmucks knife looks more like a skinner blade than a woodsman's knife,  actually, Nessmuck didn't design his knife, he bought it over the counter in a hardware store,  and it was a skinner and it wasn't a custom built for him or on spec.,  He bought it, got used to it and finally got to like it.
 Kephart didn't actually design his knife either,  he told a local blacksmith what he would like in general terms and left the final design up to the Smith.
 Neither Knives were what we would call bushcraft knives,  neither were expected to chop wood or take the place of an axe, hatchet, or saw,  they were use to clean and process fish and game, and to prep food and eat with,  they were of about the same quality as you might expect from Condor, they weren't pretty, they had plain wood scales and thin carbon steel blades.
 I would say that the Condor Kephart is a fair copy of Kephart's original knife,  my Nessmuck is a custom made knife, very high quality,  01 tool steel, 3/16ths thick and has Bocote scales,  it's a really nice knife, but it's not a true Nessmuck,  it's a custom makers take on a Nessmuck style.
 IMHO, to appreciate either knife for their beauty or for their historical value,  one has to be open to them, if you don't like them to begin with,  or you have a higher expectation than what they really were,  you will be disappointed in them.
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Offline Wilderbeast

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2014, 04:38:07 PM »
The factory was built in 1964.  It doesn't look all that primitive.  But you know the old saying "excuses are like knives, everyone has one but they don't all cut the mustard" or something like that.

" IMACASA was established in 1964 in Santa Ana, El Salvador. It was founded by Gebr. Weyersberg ? a German toolmaker whose origin dates back to 1787 when it began manufacturing swords, knives, and bayonets in the famous blade-making city of Solingen. Joining in Gebr. Weyersberg?s expansion into Central America as business development and investment partners were the Deutsche Entwicklungsgesllsc haft (DEG) of Germany, Adela Investments Company from Luxemburg, and a group of Central American investors ? mainly Salvadorians.

In 1987, a consortium of distinguished and diverse Central American business leaders acquired the company and actively directed plans for dynamic future growth, installing a new management team and providing significant capital investment.

In the years since, IMACASA has built upon its excellent reputation for the quality of its products and for its customer service, and distribution centers have been opened inMexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama to accommodate steady increases in market share throughout the Americas. The company?s product offering has also grown to meet rising demand, and manufacturing capabilities have been expanded accordingly.

In 2004, IMACASA launched its  brand of top quality tools and knives for the North American and European outdoor enthusiast and collector markets."



So it seems if they make knives with crappy QC, it is not lack of experience, facilities or ability. Probably just their business model.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2014, 07:16:25 PM »
The factory was built in 1964.  It doesn't look all that primitive.  But you know the old saying "excuses are like knives, everyone has one but they don't all cut the mustard" or something like that.

" IMACASA was established in 1964 in Santa Ana, El Salvador. It was founded by Gebr. Weyersberg ? a German toolmaker whose origin dates back to 1787 when it began manufacturing swords, knives, and bayonets in the famous blade-making city of Solingen. Joining in Gebr. Weyersberg?s expansion into Central America as business development and investment partners were the Deutsche Entwicklungsgesllsc haft (DEG) of Germany, Adela Investments Company from Luxemburg, and a group of Central American investors ? mainly Salvadorians.

In 1987, a consortium of distinguished and diverse Central American business leaders acquired the company and actively directed plans for dynamic future growth, installing a new management team and providing significant capital investment.

In the years since, IMACASA has built upon its excellent reputation for the quality of its products and for its customer service, and distribution centers have been opened inMexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama to accommodate steady increases in market share throughout the Americas. The company?s product offering has also grown to meet rising demand, and manufacturing capabilities have been expanded accordingly.

In 2004, IMACASA launched its  brand of top quality tools and knives for the North American and European outdoor enthusiast and collector markets."



So it seems if they make knives with crappy QC, it is not lack of experience, facilities or ability. Probably just their business model.

    Thanks Mike,  that's an interesting bit of history,  and you're right about excuses,  and poor quality control might very well be part of their business model,  I guess it could be more profitable to give someone who complains a replacement knife than to spend more money perfecting the over all quality of their products.
    What ever they are doing they still continue to sell product and manage to stay in business,  so far my experience with Condor is all good,  I own one of their knives,  and it came through in a condition that hasn't been a dissapointment,  actually It's been an ideal knife for what I expect of it,  and the price was right,  a win win in my case,  others milage may differ of course.
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Offline Draco

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #19 on: September 04, 2014, 02:19:53 PM »
I could not figure out how to post it but check out google maps.  There are some images there of the building.  Looks like it has not changed any since 1964.   :lol:

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #20 on: September 04, 2014, 03:17:59 PM »
You get a good thing, you stick with it & if it ain't broke, you don't fix it! :popcorn:
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Offline Draco

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #21 on: September 04, 2014, 03:30:51 PM »
Not even paint?   :shrug:   :banana:

Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #22 on: September 04, 2014, 03:37:38 PM »
Great review, Moe. :thumbsup: You had me at the 'day at the pond' bit! Wish I could have been there - sounds great.

I think condor is a great choice for an economy blade. My bushlore which was once loathed by me is now in the top of my real hard users... Go figgur.
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #23 on: September 04, 2014, 07:35:05 PM »
Thanks Moe!...i also own several condor knives and while they may be a bit rough around the edges, they are still well worth the relatively inexpensive price tag attatched to them.
i have the condor parang which is as good as and in some cases better than some malaysian models i own.

i also have the hudson bay STYLE knife by condor...like i said, a bit rough, but a real workhorse...persona lly i don't care for kepharts design but i'm sure its a great working knife as well :)...woods
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #24 on: September 04, 2014, 07:37:42 PM »
Didn't you perform some serious modifications on that Hudson Bay, Dave? :shrug:
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #25 on: September 04, 2014, 07:59:25 PM »
Didn't you perform some serious modifications on that Hudson Bay, Dave? :shrug:
yes....i actually did on my first condor hudson bay....i replaced the handle scales and put a differential heat treat to the blade...though i recently (three months ago) purchased a second one and have done nothing to it other than touch up the edge...good memory Craig

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Offline wolfy

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2014, 08:22:30 PM »
Didn't you perform some serious modifications on that Hudson Bay, Dave? :shrug:
yes....i actually did on my first condor hudson bay....i replaced the handle scales and put a differential heat treat to the blade...though i recently (three months ago) purchased a second one and have done nothing to it other than touch up the edge...good memory Craig



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................... ................... .......ball. :P


Are they still putting those 'dimples' all over the sides of the blade? 
« Last Edit: September 04, 2014, 08:42:39 PM by wolfy »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2014, 08:35:52 PM »
Didn't you perform some serious modifications on that Hudson Bay, Dave? :shrug:
yes....i actually did on my first condor hudson bay....i replaced the handle scales and put a differential heat treat to the blade...though i recently (three months ago) purchased a second one and have done nothing to it other than touch up the edge...good memory Craig



  Thanks for sharing,  I'm not a fan of big knives,  not 'cause I don't like them,  I do,  I just don't have a need for them,  But I've drooled over your Parang, and your Bowie,  and now the Hudson's bay knife is really nice,  again thanks for sharing your knives and your outtings.    :thumbsup:
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #28 on: September 04, 2014, 08:49:54 PM »
Dave, I edited my last post, but don't I don't know if you'll see it or not.....I was wondering if they are still dimpling the blade sides for that 'rustic' appearance? ???
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #29 on: September 04, 2014, 08:55:52 PM »
Nice one, Woods.

Wolfy, I've looked at the Hudson Bays on Condor's website recently and they show that dimpling. I haven't seen one 'in hand".
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #30 on: September 04, 2014, 09:01:56 PM »
Great review, Moe. :thumbsup: You had me at the 'day at the pond' bit! Wish I could have been there - sounds great.

I think condor is a great choice for an economy blade. My bushlore which was once loathed by me is now in the top of my real hard users... Go figgur.

  Thanks KK,  you have me thinking about picking up a Condor bushlore now,  I got rid of all my hard use knives a little at a time as I collected more higher end knives,  One reason the kephart appeals to me so much is that if it get crapped on, lost, or broken, it's not a big loss,  but I really do like it's size and lightness,  it really does feel like a fine utility Kitchen knife,  which is what most of my knife useage entails.
  I've been depending more on my hawk (old friend) and folding saw for processing wood lately and less on my belt knife,  I don't know if the little Kephart would be a good camp knife for your type of Canadian forrests,  but it's serving me well so far.
  I don't do much woods bumming in the dead of winter but when I do get out the woods are usually wet with snow and ice,  a bit heavier knife that I wouldn't mind beating on might be a better choice than the Kephart,  I see Amazon has the bushlore for under $30.00 this week,  the sheath alone is worth that,  so I'd be getting the knife for free, you can't beat that with a stick.

  Thanks for your advice my friend.
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Offline woodsrunner

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #31 on: September 05, 2014, 06:33:30 AM »
Dave, I edited my last post, but don't I don't know if you'll see it or not.....I was wondering if they are still dimpling the blade sides for that 'rustic' appearance? ???
sorry amigo just saw this....the knife i have now is an older version i picked up in a trade at a gun show and did not have he annoying dimpling along the blade.
i believe sarge is right in saying they still put them on...though i am not certain...sorry for the derail Moe...Dave
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #32 on: September 05, 2014, 08:33:10 AM »
I have one of the last of the non-dimpled ones, I guess.  As soon as I found out they were going to start adding those cute dimples, I fired off an order to Amazon for one of the last of smooth ones.  My intent was to modify it to more closely mimic the ones I see in the glass cases at The Museum of the Fur Trade, but so far, I have not done that.   It seems to work pretty well as it is as a chopper and battoned splitter, but I still would like to turn it into a more historically-correct knife, appearance-wise. 
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Offline Lamewolf

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #33 on: September 05, 2014, 10:34:06 AM »

   I wasn't expecting a custom made high quality exact replica of a historical artifact and I didn't get one, so I wasn't disappointed,  I did however get a exceptional rendition of Horace Kepharts favorite knife,  which in my opinion is a great little all around light duty camp knife especially suited to game and food processing and prep. which from Kepharts own writtings and backed up by Nessmucks own hand is what they used their belt knives for.
                                                                         :shrug:

  BTW,  I have both Kepart's and Nessmuck's books,  both can be a bit boring,  but well worth the money and the reference material.    :thumbsup:

I'm not arguing about the differences, just stating that there are differences.  And its ture, Kepharts actual knife edge and the one in the catalog drawing are different because his has been used and worn down through repeated sharpening through the years.  All I'm saying basically is that there are other Kephart renditions that are a lot closer to the original, but they are semi custom knives and cost a lot more.  And again, I do like my Condor Kephart really well !  I have several Condors and like them all, but I also have to say that my Kephart was the worst Condor product I have.  When I first got it, I think they forgot to sharpen it it !  It had some angle to it but was not sharp at all and it actually took some draw filing and lots of honing to get a good edge on it.  All my other Condors just required a little touch up on the edges and that's it, the Kephart would only cut the proverbial hot butter when it was new.  8)

By the way, I don't own a Nessmuk knife of any brand - just don't like the looks of them and they look like to me they are designed only as a skinner and nothing else.  But then the big hump on the back side of the point might make a last ditch spoon if need be ?  :crazy:

  LOL,  OK, "what we have here is a failure to communicate",  as in,  We ain't on the same page.

  I'm not sure what you expect out of an inexpensive knife made in South America, probably in a primitive factory (compared to US, Japanese, or Chinese knife works) known for being iffy on their quality control,  I my opinion they aren't up to custom or even semi custom quality.
  But the base materials they are using are not bad,  they on average from what I've seen and heard make satisfactory knives with a little bit of work,  Mine came in sharp enough to work with,  stripping the coating off the blade helped,  and stropping with a dab of compound had it shaving hairs off my arm,  in my book, if it looks good, cuts good, and is comfortable to work with,  it's a good knife,  mine after 30 minutes work is a good knife.
 But is it a fair representation of Kepharts design,  going by the picture of Kephart's actual knife, it is a close as I'd expect,  judging by the photo of an add selling Kephart knives during his time,  the two are not alike,  as far as I know those two images are the one used by Condor as the model for their knives,  but so has every knife maker in the industry, including the finest custom makers, so to say that one is a better likeness than the other is a bit subjective.
 When I look at the Kephart knife no matter who makes it,  I'm looking at it from a historical standpoint, same for the Nessmuck,  if you are going to compare either of the originals or close copies to those that custom makers are putting out in 3/16 thick 1095, 01 or 02 tool steel and wearing exotic wood scales, it's an unfair comparison,  and they aren't true replications of the original.
 You suggested that Nessmucks knife looks more like a skinner blade than a woodsman's knife,  actually, Nessmuck didn't design his knife, he bought it over the counter in a hardware store,  and it was a skinner and it wasn't a custom built for him or on spec.,  He bought it, got used to it and finally got to like it.
 Kephart didn't actually design his knife either,  he told a local blacksmith what he would like in general terms and left the final design up to the Smith.
 Neither Knives were what we would call bushcraft knives,  neither were expected to chop wood or take the place of an axe, hatchet, or saw,  they were use to clean and process fish and game, and to prep food and eat with,  they were of about the same quality as you might expect from Condor, they weren't pretty, they had plain wood scales and thin carbon steel blades.
 I would say that the Condor Kephart is a fair copy of Kephart's original knife,  my Nessmuck is a custom made knife, very high quality,  01 tool steel, 3/16ths thick and has Bocote scales,  it's a really nice knife, but it's not a true Nessmuck,  it's a custom makers take on a Nessmuck style.
 IMHO, to appreciate either knife for their beauty or for their historical value,  one has to be open to them, if you don't like them to begin with,  or you have a higher expectation than what they really were,  you will be disappointed in them.

OK, I'm just gonna drop the subject as I think you are taking my statements in a negative way, and that was not my intent at all.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #34 on: September 05, 2014, 02:22:45 PM »

   I wasn't expecting a custom made high quality exact replica of a historical artifact and I didn't get one, so I wasn't disappointed,  I did however get a exceptional rendition of Horace Kepharts favorite knife,  which in my opinion is a great little all around light duty camp knife especially suited to game and food processing and prep. which from Kepharts own writtings and backed up by Nessmucks own hand is what they used their belt knives for.
                                                                         :shrug:

  BTW,  I have both Kepart's and Nessmuck's books,  both can be a bit boring,  but well worth the money and the reference material.    :thumbsup:

I'm not arguing about the differences, just stating that there are differences.  And its ture, Kepharts actual knife edge and the one in the catalog drawing are different because his has been used and worn down through repeated sharpening through the years.  All I'm saying basically is that there are other Kephart renditions that are a lot closer to the original, but they are semi custom knives and cost a lot more.  And again, I do like my Condor Kephart really well !  I have several Condors and like them all, but I also have to say that my Kephart was the worst Condor product I have.  When I first got it, I think they forgot to sharpen it it !  It had some angle to it but was not sharp at all and it actually took some draw filing and lots of honing to get a good edge on it.  All my other Condors just required a little touch up on the edges and that's it, the Kephart would only cut the proverbial hot butter when it was new.  8)

By the way, I don't own a Nessmuk knife of any brand - just don't like the looks of them and they look like to me they are designed only as a skinner and nothing else.  But then the big hump on the back side of the point might make a last ditch spoon if need be ?  :crazy:

  LOL,  OK, "what we have here is a failure to communicate",  as in,  We ain't on the same page.

  I'm not sure what you expect out of an inexpensive knife made in South America, probably in a primitive factory (compared to US, Japanese, or Chinese knife works) known for being iffy on their quality control,  I my opinion they aren't up to custom or even semi custom quality.
  But the base materials they are using are not bad,  they on average from what I've seen and heard make satisfactory knives with a little bit of work,  Mine came in sharp enough to work with,  stripping the coating off the blade helped,  and stropping with a dab of compound had it shaving hairs off my arm,  in my book, if it looks good, cuts good, and is comfortable to work with,  it's a good knife,  mine after 30 minutes work is a good knife.
 But is it a fair representation of Kepharts design,  going by the picture of Kephart's actual knife, it is a close as I'd expect,  judging by the photo of an add selling Kephart knives during his time,  the two are not alike,  as far as I know those two images are the one used by Condor as the model for their knives,  but so has every knife maker in the industry, including the finest custom makers, so to say that one is a better likeness than the other is a bit subjective.
 When I look at the Kephart knife no matter who makes it,  I'm looking at it from a historical standpoint, same for the Nessmuck,  if you are going to compare either of the originals or close copies to those that custom makers are putting out in 3/16 thick 1095, 01 or 02 tool steel and wearing exotic wood scales, it's an unfair comparison,  and they aren't true replications of the original.
 You suggested that Nessmucks knife looks more like a skinner blade than a woodsman's knife,  actually, Nessmuck didn't design his knife, he bought it over the counter in a hardware store,  and it was a skinner and it wasn't a custom built for him or on spec.,  He bought it, got used to it and finally got to like it.
 Kephart didn't actually design his knife either,  he told a local blacksmith what he would like in general terms and left the final design up to the Smith.
 Neither Knives were what we would call bushcraft knives,  neither were expected to chop wood or take the place of an axe, hatchet, or saw,  they were use to clean and process fish and game, and to prep food and eat with,  they were of about the same quality as you might expect from Condor, they weren't pretty, they had plain wood scales and thin carbon steel blades.
 I would say that the Condor Kephart is a fair copy of Kephart's original knife,  my Nessmuck is a custom made knife, very high quality,  01 tool steel, 3/16ths thick and has Bocote scales,  it's a really nice knife, but it's not a true Nessmuck,  it's a custom makers take on a Nessmuck style.
 IMHO, to appreciate either knife for their beauty or for their historical value,  one has to be open to them, if you don't like them to begin with,  or you have a higher expectation than what they really were,  you will be disappointed in them.

OK, I'm just gonna drop the subject as I think you are taking my statements in a negative way, and that was not my intent at all.

  Not at all,  check your PM box.     :cheers:
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Offline Agile Woodsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #35 on: October 03, 2014, 04:43:45 PM »
Take a look at the original Kephart at this site: http://www.wcu.edu/library/DigitalCollections/Kephart/onlineexhibit/outdoors/Hunting.htm
You will notice some minor differences in the handle and blade shape.  For one, the choil on the original is a rounded hump where the Condor has sharper angles, the handle is fatter on the original, and the edge profile is slightly different between the two of them.  Minor differences but still different for sure.

On another note, what an interesting leather sheath. I can see where the belt went through, and a little hole for, perhaps, button hanging like the Scandinavians did? I wonder how the retention was on that thing, it doesn't look super secure.

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #36 on: October 13, 2014, 07:34:47 AM »
  I am still putting mine through the paces a little at a time, but so far it seems like a nice knife & sheath for the price. Maybe could have a thicker blade and handle for my liking, but... time will tell. It might just be due to hand size... I am not gonna give up my knife from Mario for main carry, but I still am willing to use this one & see how it goes.
 :)


PS - This is  Moes "Review" of this knife, and I am still a bit confused on whether I should post anything in this topic to add to it, or one of the other ones about this knife? I think there are like 3-4 ones with "Condor Kephart" in the title. I just chose this one, since it was the most recent, & had "review" in the title.


I even have some " comparison" (to other knives) photos to share, but am hesitant...


I don't know. If it doesn't belong here, would a Moderator please move it to the appropriate place...
 :shrug:
 
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #37 on: October 13, 2014, 04:45:27 PM »
  I am still putting mine through the paces a little at a time, but so far it seems like a nice knife & sheath for the price. Maybe could have a thicker blade and handle for my liking, but... time will tell. It might just be due to hand size... I am not gonna give up my knife from Mario for main carry, but I still am willing to use this one & see how it goes.
 :)


PS - This is  Moes "Review" of this knife, and I am still a bit confused on whether I should post anything in this topic to add to it, or one of the other ones about this knife? I think there are like 3-4 ones with "Condor Kephart" in the title. I just chose this one, since it was the most recent, & had "review" in the title.


I even have some " comparison" (to other knives) photos to share, but am hesitant...


I don't know. If it doesn't belong here, would a Moderator please move it to the appropriate place...
 :shrug:
 

    Post what you have JB,  including your opinions pro & con,  sharing information and learning is what makes these and other forums like it worthwhile,  I my opinion the Condor Kephart has some failings,  if I could change a few I'd start with making the scales bigger,  the blade thicker and longer to five inches.
    Like you I have one of Mario's knives,  I wouldn't start to use it to judge the Kephart,  they are worlds apart material and workmanship wise,  and again,  like you the Condor Kephart would not be my main go to knife for an extended stay in the woods where I would be asking it to do some heavy duty work.
    However, there are some things I do like about the Kephart,  as a kitchen type knife for food prep it excels,  far better than my MLL knife,  for cleaning fish and small game it's perfect,  it strips bark and cuts cordage with the best knives,  and it's a fair hand at making notches and sharpening sticks and caving triggers for traps,  and just the knife for making toothpicks and shaving by the fire just to kill time.
    Lastly,  when someone says "hey can I borrow your knife for a second",  I have a lot less of a problem handing them my $35.00 Kephart than I do my $225.00 MLL Adirondack.

    I'd like to hear your comments and see your pictures JB,  put 'em up so we can all share.    :thumbsup:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Sarge

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #38 on: October 13, 2014, 10:31:03 PM »
 :popcorn:
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline Spyder1958

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #39 on: October 14, 2014, 04:55:16 PM »
 :popcorn: :rofl:
Me to sarge, where's the beef
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Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #40 on: October 14, 2014, 06:22:13 PM »
  OK.. I am not "getting" the popcorn thing. Anyone want to explain?
:shrug:


  I thought the topic here was about the Condor Kephart & Review of how it works.


Moe seems OK with my posting what I thought about the one I bought & have bee actually "using"...


 WTH? fellas.


Got me wondering if we are reading the same thing...


Do you fellers eating the popcorn & all, own one?

   Got a real life opinion on how they feel in your hands?


   Maybe, on how they perform in real use out in the field?


"I" would be interested in your "informed" opinion, & other "informed" info about your experiences with the Condor Kephart knife... That you either own, or have actually held in your hands & used for a decent enough time to let us all know of your experiences...


Otherwise.. You seem to only be  :stir:  for some reason ...
 which escapes me & doesn't reflect well on what you might have to offer if you can't answer the two questions I italicized above, about this knife.


  Help me out here fellers... I don't "get it.".
:shrug:
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #41 on: October 15, 2014, 12:24:52 AM »
Here are some comparison pictures I took a short while back. The knives are all relatively the same size, but there are certainly some differences in shape of blade & handles for sure. The pics aren't all that good, but I am not all that good at taking pics anyway. I tried to do the best I could.


 Left to right:


Mora 840MG, Custom from MLL Knives, Condor Kephart, Condor Bushlore











Crappy pic, but trying to show the thickness difference between the two Condor knives, Kephart on the right with the thinner blade closest to the camera. MoraMG & custom on the endgate.



Thickness between the MLL & the Kephart , with the Kephart at the bottom:


« Last Edit: October 15, 2014, 12:33:42 AM by MnSportsman »
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Sarge

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #42 on: October 15, 2014, 12:32:12 AM »
I was not trying to :stir:  or  :duel:

I thought the popcorn meant I am interested in what you have to say. If it means something else then I apologize.

No, I don't have one but I like most anything Kephart-related. I have one Condor and think they are a good value. I enjoyed the previous reviews and comments about the Kephart knife and am interested in other perspectives.

I like your blades (especially that MLL) and you comparisons.  :thumbsup:
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline MnSportsman

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #43 on: October 15, 2014, 12:47:33 AM »
  Sure Sarge! I understand now, & no apology needed it seems.
 :)


  It seems that we just had a misunderstanding about what the popcorn doodad means.


I thought it meant something like "Ho hum", boring stuff...Wonder what is next?, in this topic.
 Like in watching a movie, and if it isn't all that interesting, I may as well just eat my popcorn instead. Particularly with no other comment added with it.


And you meant you were "interested", instead.
 :)


LOL.. Well I just learned something.
 :)


Thanks for helping me "get it", cuz I was a bit bummed about it.


And Glad ya liked the pics even though they were crappy ones.
 :)


Those knives are the ones I have been messing around with over the last year or more, just trying them out for different things, every so often. They each have their own "personality", for lack of a better word. Kind of like having different types of pistols to shoot every so often. Marios (MLL) is still my favorite though.


The Kephart is the newest & I just wanted one to compare to these and some of the other knives I own & use. No closet queens for this guy , anyway. They have to do the jobs I want, or they get sold... or given away.
 ;)


Thanks!
:D
I love being out in the woods!   I like this quote from Mors Kochanski - "The more you know, the less you carry". I believe in the same creed, & think  "Knowledge & honed skills" are the best things to carry with ya when you're out in the wilds. They're the ultimate "ultralight" gear! ;)

Offline Sarge

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #44 on: October 15, 2014, 03:56:43 AM »
Sorry about all that...

Pics were fine. I have a Mora Clipper and a Bushlore so your pics provided a good scale / perspective.
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline Spyder1958

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #45 on: October 15, 2014, 01:44:03 PM »
JB, like Sarge, I was saying, by using the popcorn, we are anxiously awaiting the info about this blade from real use, like intermission at the movies, ready to see and here whats next, not stirring the pot. I don't have a condor or have never held one, so was looking forward to any info about the blade.  :popcorn: + where's the beef = awaiting more info
Sorry didn't mean to imply it was boring by any means.

Thanks for the comparison between the blades and your thoughts, that helps alot when deciding to purchase a blade.
You are free to choose but you are not free from the consequences of your choice.
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Offline Sarge

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #46 on: October 15, 2014, 06:27:28 PM »
where's the beef

That's a blast from the past!  :lol:
"The man with the knapsack is never lost." Horace Kephart (1862-1931)

Offline jinya1004

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #47 on: April 02, 2015, 03:59:06 PM »
My buddy and I both ordered the Condor Kephart and when we received it, it was like we got two different Kepharts from different companies. I have noticed that Condor fit and finish vastly differ knife to knife.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #48 on: April 15, 2015, 07:50:27 AM »
My buddy and I both ordered the Condor Kephart and when we received it, it was like we got two different Kepharts from different companies. I have noticed that Condor fit and finish vastly differ knife to knife.

  I just revisited this thread and noticed your latest post,  I agree with you after seeing a few other Condor Kepharts,  it does look like there are no two alike,  which goes back to what I posted earlier that they seem to have pretty primitive production methods and not much in the way of standards between the different phases of making them.
 The one that I have has a thinner blade than some others I've seen,  as I've suggested before,  if you don't hold any high expectations that you have found a gem of a bushcraft knife for a ridiculously low price you shouldn't be disappointed with it,  IMHO it's the equivalent of a good high carbon plain edged steak knife that doubles as a decent sportsmans general utility blade.
 However, if you expect to carry it as you main bushcraft/camp knife you'll find it lacking in some areas,  I have taken to carrying mine in my pack,  I use it mostly for food prep and other light duty tasks and it serves me well in that respect.
 For processing fire wood or other camp projects that require cutting wood I use a good folding saw and a hatchet or hawk,  it's quicker and easier than batoning with a knife and it saves you allot of the trouble of maintaining your main belt knife.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Unknown

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Re: Condor Kephart Knife field review
« Reply #49 on: April 15, 2015, 09:12:58 AM »
That seems to be consistent with methods found in the old classics that I have read. I haven't read them all. My guess is using only a knife to process wood, baton came out of military survival instruction, but I'm not sure. It's a good thing to practice, but I seldom use it because I like saws and axes. When I first saw someone use a baton the make cuts for a pot hook, or trap trigger I was darned amazed. I had seen pictures of the finished product but approached the making the hard way. Any knife should be expected to survive that use.

Good info on the Condor. I want a Kephart style knife but plan to configure my own.
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