Author Topic: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day  (Read 590 times)

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Offline wsdstan

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Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« on: May 30, 2021, 02:07:43 PM »
Duane Horgan was my best friend in High School.  We went to the same University for a time. He didn't want to get drafted so he joined the Marines.   Duane was killed on 5/22/1968.  He was 23 years old.  Radio operator on Marine patrol killed by small arms fire.  I think of him often, of a life not lived, and while I thank him for his sacrifice, when I see kneelers or those who refuse to stand for the colors, it angers me.  On this Memorial Day I will think of him, and look at the rubbing of his name I took from the traveling wall twenty five years ago. 

A lot of men and women have laid down their lives for our country and tomorrow I will think about them and the cost of freedom.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline crashdive123

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2021, 02:27:10 PM »
Thank you for that.  I will say a prayer for Duane Horgan and his family this Memorial Day.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2021, 02:37:36 PM »
I recall you mentioning your friend before.  I will honor his memory with a prayer for his family and his best friend.  Thank you for bringing the reason for Memorial Day to the forum, Stan....many people have no clue as to its real significance.
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2021, 05:15:54 PM »
Thanks for both of those responses, they mean a lot.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline Phaedrus

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2021, 11:31:35 PM »
Smoke sent for your friend and for all those that died serving their country.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2021, 06:59:57 AM »

  Prayers sent Stan,  sorry for your loss, and for all of our losses to the cost of keeping us free,  I was reminded yesterday while doing some little project in my shop I rearraigned some of my powder horns that I'm not using at the moment and one caught my eye that made in 1976 to wear at the celebration commemorating our 200 year anniversary.   
  It's honey colored, about 8" long with a slight left hand twist on the spout end so that it fits perfectly on my right side, on it I scrimshawed a map of the trek that the Minutemen took from the area towns around my home to answer the call to arms against the Kings forces up into Lexington and on to Concord, and then engaged the British troops and chased them back to Boston on what is now referred to around here as Liberty Road.
  On the right side of the horn facing outward I engraved in large bold letters "What Price Liberty", and right under that I engraved "Blood",  the horn reminded me of the sacrifice that we have made as a country both in the blood of our young men and women and our national treasure to keep those freedoms and liberties.
  It also reminded me just how close we are to loosing what this country and those that went before us sacrificed to hold on too,  I can only pray that we as Americans still have that kind of resolve today.
  Thanks Stan for your reminder that Memorial Day is one of, if not the most important holidays that we celebrate each year. 

   :cheers:
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Offline boomer

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2021, 07:07:27 AM »
Service to our nation is an honorable obligation for citizens and it is appropriate we remember their sacrifices as well as our debts to them.

In doing so it may be wise to recognize that "All wars are the same war" in the most basic sense. Today we live with the possibility troops born at the outset of the Afghan invasion could be serving in that country on this Memorial Day.  Maybe we should question that, especially today.

When the tragic death mentioned in the op occurred we had a draft and citizens from all walks of life were called. When that conflict lost civilian support we changed the system much as the earlier Romans had. Our situation today is in many ways similar.

We will always need to be able to mount an effective defense of our nation. That's a given. That fact bears upon our responsibilities as citizens. Today it might also be wise to recall our Constitution generally limits the standing military to rwo year funding cycles.

The combat death of a friend is certainly a tragic loss. Are the deaths of hundreds or thousands a "victory"? Questions like that are why I continue to support Veterans for Peace.

« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 08:01:24 AM by boomer »

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2021, 07:39:44 AM »
Service to our nation is an honorable obligation for citizens and it is appropriate we remember their sacrifices as well as our debts to them.

In doing so it may be wise to recognize that "All wars are the same war" in the most basic sense. Today we live with the possibility troops born at the outset of the Afghan invasion could be serving in that country today. Maybe we should question that, especially today.

When the tragic death mentioned in the op occurred we had a draft and citizens from all walks of life were called. When that conflict lost civilian support we changed the system much as the earlier Romans had. Our situation today is in many ways similar.

We will always need to be able to mount an effective defense of our nation. That's a given. That fact bears upon our responsibilities as citizens. Today it might also be wise to recall our Constitution generally limits the standing military to rwo year funding cycles.

The combat death of a friend is certainly a tragic loss. Are the deaths of hundreds or thousands a "victory"? Questions like that are why I continue to support Veterans for Peace.


   :lol: You really are an A$$.    :shrug:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline boomer

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2021, 08:18:50 AM »
Service to our nation is an honorable obligation for citizens and it is appropriate we remember their sacrifices as well as our debts to them.

In doing so it may be wise to recognize that "All wars are the same war" in the most basic sense. Today we live with the possibility troops born at the outset of the Afghan invasion could be serving in that country today. Maybe we should question that, especially today.

When the tragic death mentioned in the op occurred we had a draft and citizens from all walks of life were called. When that conflict lost civilian support we changed the system much as the earlier Romans had. Our situation today is in many ways similar.

We will always need to be able to mount an effective defense of our nation. That's a given. That fact bears upon our responsibilities as citizens. Today it might also be wise to recall our Constitution generally limits the standing military to rwo year funding cycles.

The combat death of a friend is certainly a tragic loss. Are the deaths of hundreds or thousands a "victory"? Questions like that are why I continue to support Veterans for Peace.


   :lol: You really are an A$$.    :shrug:

Could be. Can't argue that.  But maybe i know about war having seen it up close and personal. Something like that tends to leave a lasting impression and opinions that may be at odds with those of the, thankfully, less experienced. Troops are killed, maimed and injured in combat regardless of their uniform. We can mourn their losses but if we do not question the reasons then we not only dishonor their sacrifices but fail our responsibilities as citizens.
« Last Edit: May 31, 2021, 08:24:32 AM by boomer »

Offline wsdstan

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2021, 10:52:24 AM »
Thanks Moe.  Appropriate post and one I appreciate.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2021, 03:01:44 PM »
Service to our nation is an honorable obligation for citizens and it is appropriate we remember their sacrifices as well as our debts to them.

In doing so it may be wise to recognize that "All wars are the same war" in the most basic sense. Today we live with the possibility troops born at the outset of the Afghan invasion could be serving in that country today. Maybe we should question that, especially today.

When the tragic death mentioned in the op occurred we had a draft and citizens from all walks of life were called. When that conflict lost civilian support we changed the system much as the earlier Romans had. Our situation today is in many ways similar.

We will always need to be able to mount an effective defense of our nation. That's a given. That fact bears upon our responsibilities as citizens. Today it might also be wise to recall our Constitution generally limits the standing military to rwo year funding cycles.

The combat death of a friend is certainly a tragic loss. Are the deaths of hundreds or thousands a "victory"? Questions like that are why I continue to support Veterans for Peace.


   :lol: You really are an A$$.    :shrug:

Could be. Can't argue that.  But maybe i know about war having seen it up close and personal. Something like that tends to leave a lasting impression and opinions that may be at odds with those of the, thankfully, less experienced. Troops are killed, maimed and injured in combat regardless of their uniform. We can mourn their losses but if we do not question the reasons then we not only dishonor their sacrifices but fail our responsibilities as citizens.

  There is absolutely nothing wrong with having differing opinions nor voicing those opinions,  but there are times when they might be appreciated,  and then there are times when they should be kept to ones self, this was one of those times, you should have known better,  in my opinion. 
  Try also to keep in mind that you are not the only person that has experienced war and personal combat close up and have been saddened, even offended by it, you are only one of many,  most of who don't wear their memories on their sleeves.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline boomer

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2021, 04:04:29 PM »
Service to our nation is an honorable obligation for citizens and it is appropriate we remember their sacrifices as well as our debts to them.

In doing so it may be wise to recognize that "All wars are the same war" in the most basic sense. Today we live with the possibility troops born at the outset of the Afghan invasion could be serving in that country today. Maybe we should question that, especially today.

When the tragic death mentioned in the op occurred we had a draft and citizens from all walks of life were called. When that conflict lost civilian support we changed the system much as the earlier Romans had. Our situation today is in many ways similar.

We will always need to be able to mount an effective defense of our nation. That's a given. That fact bears upon our responsibilities as citizens. Today it might also be wise to recall our Constitution generally limits the standing military to rwo year funding cycles.

The combat death of a friend is certainly a tragic loss. Are the deaths of hundreds or thousands a "victory"? Questions like that are why I continue to support Veterans for Peace.


   :lol: You really are an A$$.    :shrug:

Could be. Can't argue that.  But maybe i know about war having seen it up close and personal. Something like that tends to leave a lasting impression and opinions that may be at odds with those of the, thankfully, less experienced. Troops are killed, maimed and injured in combat regardless of their uniform. We can mourn their losses but if we do not question the reasons then we not only dishonor their sacrifices but fail our responsibilities as citizens.

  There is absolutely nothing wrong with having differing opinions nor voicing those opinions,  but there are times when they might be appreciated,  and then there are times when they should be kept to ones self, this was one of those times, you should have known better,  in my opinion. 
  Try also to keep in mind that you are not the only person that has experienced war and personal combat close up and have been saddened, even offended by it, you are only one of many,  most of who don't wear their memories on their sleeves.   

The loss of a loved one or friend can have long term effects and we may honor them in memory. As we should.

It is true i am but one among many who have served and known war for what it truly is. Those of us who share that distinction may come to see the experience in a broader perspective and decide to inform fellow citizens about war without the jingoism and cinematic nonsense. To stay silent becomes complicity.

It takes nothing away from the feelings of sorrow and loss one person feels to recognize they too are but one among many, far too many, regardless of the uniform worn or flag followed. The policies and decisions that send troops into combat are made far away for reasons that may not bear scrutiny. Troops in the field have different concerns.  Who then can and will ask Cui Bono on their behalf?

It is tragic a young man died in combat. The names on The Wall in DC list many more tragedies from that "conflict" but don't tell us of those who have borne and still grieve those tragedies. Each is also one among many.  The same can be said of every war. 

For all wars are the same war.

Offline crashdive123

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2021, 07:14:02 PM »
Service to our nation is an honorable obligation for citizens and it is appropriate we remember their sacrifices as well as our debts to them.

In doing so it may be wise to recognize that "All wars are the same war" in the most basic sense. Today we live with the possibility troops born at the outset of the Afghan invasion could be serving in that country today. Maybe we should question that, especially today.

When the tragic death mentioned in the op occurred we had a draft and citizens from all walks of life were called. When that conflict lost civilian support we changed the system much as the earlier Romans had. Our situation today is in many ways similar.

We will always need to be able to mount an effective defense of our nation. That's a given. That fact bears upon our responsibilities as citizens. Today it might also be wise to recall our Constitution generally limits the standing military to rwo year funding cycles.

The combat death of a friend is certainly a tragic loss. Are the deaths of hundreds or thousands a "victory"? Questions like that are why I continue to support Veterans for Peace.


   :lol: You really are an A$$.    :shrug:

Could be. Can't argue that.  But maybe i know about war having seen it up close and personal. Something like that tends to leave a lasting impression and opinions that may be at odds with those of the, thankfully, less experienced. Troops are killed, maimed and injured in combat regardless of their uniform. We can mourn their losses but if we do not question the reasons then we not only dishonor their sacrifices but fail our responsibilities as citizens.

Please know that you are not the only one that has served in war and knows loss.  Still no reason to point it out in every other post you make. 

Offline OutdoorEnvy

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2021, 07:18:28 PM »
Sorry for the loss of a best friend Stan.  I understand how it feels and to wonder what could have been for a dear friend.  I lost my closest friend from high school as well.  1st Lieutenant David Timothy Wright II, he was killed 9-14-2009 in Afghanistan serving our country and those less fortunate.  Too many like him...Prayers for all family and friends today of the fallen.
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Offline wsdstan

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Re: Remembering a friend on Memorial Day
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2021, 09:37:59 PM »
We share that sadness.  Thanks for the comment.
A man who carries a cat by the tail learns  something he can learn in no other way. 
(Mark Twain)