Author Topic: Chili  (Read 12672 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Chili
« on: August 05, 2012, 10:15:25 AM »

  I've been through most of the threads in the cooking section here and was surprised at the lack of chatter and recipes of one of America's favorite foods,  Chili.

  If you are like most arm chair chefs and grill masters,  you likely have a favorite Chili recipe,  hows about sharing your recipe with us.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2012, 10:32:08 AM »

  I've been through most of the threads in the cooking section here and was surprised at the lack of chatter and recipes of one of America's favorite foods,  Chili.

  If you are like most arm chair chefs and grill masters,  you likely have a favorite Chili recipe,  hows about sharing your recipe with us.
LOL! For "arm chair chefs", there's always cooks.com. Otherwise, my idea of chili is at least 3 varieties of wild meat, 3-4 varieties of peppers, and a maximum of 2:1 ratio of meat over beans. I prefer using 2 types of beans, pinto beans, and kidney beans in my chili.
I know a lot of folks think putting beans in chili is blasphemy. Others are just the opposite. To them, there's chili, (all beans and peppers) and then there's chilli con carne (chili with meat).
My chili gets simmered for at least 6 hours to blend everything. And don't forget the cumin spice.
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Chili
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2012, 10:41:13 AM »
I'm not a chili expert. So I have been using a recipe that came in my crock pot instruction manual. It calls for both pinto and red kidney beans. It is awesome tasting, whatever the purists want to call it. It's one of those recipes my wife will ask me to make out of the blue.

I'll post it up when I get a chance to find the booklet.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Chili
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2012, 10:50:11 AM »
I'm not much on chili but do make a very mild , quick version on a very cold day. 

Brown up a pound of hamburger, toss in chopped onions/celery/garlic/greenpepper if I have it and half a packet of mild chili seasoning.    Toss in one home canned jar of crushed tomatoes and one can of chili beans already seasoned.     Get hot and eat. 

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2012, 11:20:53 AM »
Ah, yes... Cinnamon is another "secret ingredient" that gives it a special "bump".
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Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: Chili
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2012, 11:25:36 AM »
Ok, here's the recipe, from the Rival Crock Pot instruction manual. They don't have it on their website so I am happy to be posting it here to preserve it for reference purposes.

"Signature Chili"

Olive oil
1 12 oz. can beef broth
3 tsp. chili powder
5 cloves garlic
2 12oz. cans red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
2 28oz cans crushed tomatoes
1 tsp salt
1 tsp cayenne pepper
1 green pepper *, seeded and diced
1 long red pepper*, seeded and diced
3 lbs ground beef
1 tsp oregano
1 tsp cumin
2 12 oz cans pinto beans drained and rinsed
5 dashes hot sauce
1 12oz can of tomato paste
1 tsp black pepper
1 red pepper* diced
2 serrano chili peppers diced

1. In a skillet add a little olive oil and brown the meat, then drain fat.
2. Add meat and all other ingredients to the crock pot and mix well.
3. Cover and cook over low heat for 8 hours.
4. Stir occasionally and mix well before serving.

*This recipe is a little vague about what a green pepper and a long red pepper are. What I usually do is use 2 regular green bell peppers and 2 Anaheim chilis. My wife like it on the mild side so instead of the two serrano chilis I'll usually just do one large jalapeno. And I usually skip the hot sauce as well.

However, for a real treat with a kick, make the recipe as-is, only substituting in the Anaheim chilis.

I always serve it with freshly grated cheddar or colby-jack cheese and a dollop of sour cream on top.

Even if you're a chili purist and insist upon no beans, this recipe is worth trying. Give it another name, don't call it chili, whatever, but try it! It is so freakin' good you will love it!
« Last Edit: August 15, 2012, 01:03:55 AM by PetrifiedWood »

Offline Bearhunter

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Chili
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2012, 11:52:15 AM »
Heres my favorite chili recipe:

1 lb ground beef
1 lb ground pork
12oz tomato paste
16oz tomato sauce
3 24oz cans kidney beans
6 Tbs garlic powder
2 tablespoons onion powder
2 tablespoons cumin
2 tablespoons parsley
2 teaspoons oregano
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon chili powder
One onion
4 habanero peppers
1 tablespoon cayenne powder
2 Mexican red chilies
1 cup elbow macaroni
6 oz beef stock

Brown the meat and onion, finely dice the peppers

Mix all together and simmer 4 to 5 hours or more adding the macaroni towards the end.
Also, I like it spicy and add extra peppers :D
Try this recipe I guarantee you you will love it.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2012, 12:00:27 PM by Bearhunter »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2012, 11:58:41 AM »
Heres my favorite chili recipe:

1 lb ground beef
1 lb ground pork
.....

4 habanero peppers
1 tablespoon cayenne powder
2 Mexican red chilies
....
Also, I like it spicy and add extra peppers :D

With only 2# of meat, yeee-haaaa! Where's the beer? And pass the white bread! Hahaha!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #8 on: August 05, 2012, 12:01:13 PM »
I'm not much on chili but do make a very mild , quick version on a very cold day. 

Brown up a pound of hamburger, toss in chopped onions/celery/garlic/greenpepper if I have it and half a packet of mild chili seasoning.    Toss in one home canned jar of crushed tomatoes and one can of chili beans already seasoned.     Get hot and eat. 

WW.
I don't know if it would make it too 'hot' for you, but for a real simple combo you might look for Ro*Tel brand "diced tomatoes and green chilis" at the store. It also makes for a quick-n-ready salsa dip for chips!
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Chili
« Reply #9 on: August 05, 2012, 01:36:01 PM »
Some folks are rabid in how chili should be made and how their chili is the ONLY one worth talking about, but in truth, I enjoy several different recipes and consistencies.  Beans, no beans, thick, soup-like, ground meat, cubed meat, hot, mild, etc.  It's just about ALL good vittles, as far as I'm concerned, so this thread sounds like it has the potential to be a 'gold mine' of possibilities :stir:

One thing I have noticed is the mention of cinnamon as a vital ingredient.....I agree, but it is the ONE ingredient that you can easily go overboard on.  My wife and I collaborated on a mess o' chili one time where we both put in the cinnamon without the other's knowledge :puke:

Venison gets used a LOT in our versions of chili, since we usually always have two deer to eat over a year's time.  The loins and tenderloins naturally get served to guests and used up all too quickly, leaving lesser cuts and lots of burger in the freezer.  That means LOTS of chili, taverns (or whatever regional name they have in your area), tacos, grilled burgers, etc. are on our menu much of the time.

I'll add one of our favorites later on, but I don't have time right now.....guests coming, soon 8)
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Chili
« Reply #10 on: August 05, 2012, 01:45:15 PM »
Here I go.. sidetracking this thread..  :)

OP.. I love using that Ro-tel in with velveta, ground burger and a can of those chili flavored beans for a dip. :)   

I typed the word 'chili' so I'm still with in bounds....   O:-)

Do you guys add anything odd to your chili's?  I've just in the last year have had cornbread with chili.  I've seen maccaroni with chili scooped on top and I've seen sour cream stirred in with green onions..

PS. Wolfy...  Theres a report out now that Cinnamon (the spice) tells your body to let loose of the yellow fat in your body.   I"ve been reading up on it and have been putting a teaspoon of it in my morning coffee..  lbs are still falling off here.. :)   I first heard about this on The Doctors show I caught when hubby was in physical therapy.   

WW.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #11 on: August 05, 2012, 02:08:08 PM »

Do you guys add anything odd to your chili's?  I've just in the last year have had cornbread with chili.  I've seen maccaroni with chili scooped on top and I've seen sour cream stirred in with green onions..

PS. Wolfy...  Theres a report out now that Cinnamon (the spice) tells your body to let loose of the yellow fat in your body.   I"ve been reading up on it and have been putting a teaspoon of it in my morning coffee..  lbs are still falling off here.. :)   I first heard about this on The Doctors show I caught when hubby was in physical therapy.   

WW.
One of the recipes already entered had macaroni mixed in. We call that Chili-Mac here.
That is great info about the cinnamon, WW!  You say you have proof it work? How long have you been doing it?
Re: cinnamon in chili. That one recipe above called for 1/4 tsp in a LOT of chili. Agreed, you can use too much! It's one of those things that you can't quite put your finger on when it's there (in chili) but you can tell when it's not.

Oh...the way I found out about cinnamon in chili was my son who's the want-to-be chef and works in a restaurant clued me in to cinnamon being the 'secret' in great hamburger gravy.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2012, 02:10:09 PM by Old Philosopher »
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2012, 08:16:30 PM »
  It's nice to see that so many folks like their Chili with beans,  though I'm told that Chili that has beens in the recipe ain't real Chili,  I've only seen and tried one beanless Chili in my life,  it was at a tavern that promoted old time country music and dancing.
 Texas style is what they called it,  it wasn't bad,  but it wasn't my style of Chili,  being from close to Boston,  it's gotta have beans,  I usually include pinto, black beans, and red kidney in my Chili.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #13 on: August 05, 2012, 08:20:18 PM »
Ah, yes... Cinnamon is another "secret ingredient" that gives it a special "bump".

  That's a new one on me OP,  How much do you suggest for say four quarts of Chili ?
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Chili
« Reply #14 on: August 05, 2012, 08:51:29 PM »
Isnt a Coney dog a hotdog with beanless chili dumped over it?     :)

WW.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2012, 10:27:29 PM »
Ah, yes... Cinnamon is another "secret ingredient" that gives it a special "bump".

  That's a new one on me OP,  How much do you suggest for say four quarts of Chili ?
Probably 1/2 tsp. Gotta go easy with it.
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Chili
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2012, 07:08:55 AM »
Isnt a Coney dog a hotdog with beanless chili dumped over it?     :)

WW.

Only if it also has raw onion and yellow mustard on it too.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #17 on: August 06, 2012, 07:36:55 AM »
Isnt a Coney dog a hotdog with beanless chili dumped over it?     :)

WW.

  I think you are talking about a Coney Island hot dog,  or in some places it's called a NY styled Weinner.

  Most are made with a smaller dia. type of dog that's seasoned a little differently than regular frankfutters or hot dogs,  they have paprika in the recipe and take on a slightly reddish tint when grilled.
  They're served on a steamed bun with a loose meat sauce,  yellow mustard,  finely chopped onion, and a dusting of celery salt.
  Interesting is that weinners were banned in the state of MA. over a half century ago,  any NY style hotdogs served here are made with regular hotdogs,  but go across the border into Rhode Island and they are made using the "real' Coney island weinners.
 
  Hotdogs served with a Chili topping here in New England are just refered to as Chili Dogs,  and the Chili always includes beans. 
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #18 on: August 06, 2012, 07:40:06 AM »
Ah, yes... Cinnamon is another "secret ingredient" that gives it a special "bump".

  That's a new one on me OP,  How much do you suggest for say four quarts of Chili ?
Probably 1/2 tsp. Gotta go easy with it.

  Thanks OP,  I'll be sure to try it next time,  I made a pot yesterday morning before I saw your tip,  or I'd have included it then.
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Chili
« Reply #19 on: August 06, 2012, 07:50:48 AM »
Isnt a Coney dog a hotdog with beanless chili dumped over it?     :)

WW.

  I think you are talking about a Coney Island hot dog,  or in some places it's called a NY styled Weinner.

  Most are made with a smaller dia. type of dog that's seasoned a little differently than regular frankfutters or hot dogs,  they have paprika in the recipe and take on a slightly reddish tint when grilled.
  They're served on a steamed bun with a loose meat sauce,  yellow mustard,  finely chopped onion, and a dusting of celery salt.
  Interesting is that weinners were banned in the state of MA. over a half century ago,  any NY style hotdogs served here are made with regular hotdogs,  but go across the border into Rhode Island and they are made using the "real' Coney island weinners.
 
  Hotdogs served with a Chili topping here in New England are just refered to as Chili Dogs,  and the Chili always includes beans.

In my home town there are at least 4 different places that make the dog.  I've tried all four, but like 99 out of 100 people in town the first place you started with becomes the only one you frequent after trying the others.  People are rabid about their dog stand.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #20 on: August 06, 2012, 08:12:50 AM »
  I pride myself on being a pretty good cook,  but I'm not an expert by any stretch,  and after more years than I care to admit to of honing my kitchen skills there's still a lot to learn,  PO's tip about using cinnamon is a good example.
  This Cooking and recipes section is a great resource for both seasoned cooks and those folks who get lost in the kitchen or near the campfire and just need a little help,  I'd like to thank those that have shown me new food related ideas and tips here,  but in truth everyone here has at one time or another,  so here's a collective thanks to you all.
 
  OK, I've a chili question,  as most of us know,  there are some foods that people get really passionate about,  sometimes to the point of arguing,  one of those is Chili,  everyone seems to have a favorite recipe and a specific style,  Beans/no beans,  buger vs. stew meat,  tomatoes/ no tomatoes,  just onions or celery, onions and garlic,  home made Chili seasonings or prepared Chili powder,  a little Cumin,  a lot of Cumin,  or none at all.

  I've heard these arguments a lot from guys like you and I and especially around the Fire Station where several of my friends work.
  So hear's my question,  in your opinion, is Chili one of those regional type foods that varies with the region or is it one of those foods that in the beginning was made up of what ever you had laying around in the way of left overs,  you put in a pot,  add some seasoning and Chili powder and called it supper.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #21 on: August 06, 2012, 08:29:27 AM »
Isnt a Coney dog a hotdog with beanless chili dumped over it?     :)

WW.

  I think you are talking about a Coney Island hot dog,  or in some places it's called a NY styled Weinner.

  Most are made with a smaller dia. type of dog that's seasoned a little differently than regular frankfutters or hot dogs,  they have paprika in the recipe and take on a slightly reddish tint when grilled.
  They're served on a steamed bun with a loose meat sauce,  yellow mustard,  finely chopped onion, and a dusting of celery salt.
  Interesting is that weinners were banned in the state of MA. over a half century ago,  any NY style hotdogs served here are made with regular hotdogs,  but go across the border into Rhode Island and they are made using the "real' Coney island weinners.
 
  Hotdogs served with a Chili topping here in New England are just refered to as Chili Dogs,  and the Chili always includes beans.

In my home town there are at least 4 different places that make the dog.  I've tried all four, but like 99 out of 100 people in town the first place you started with becomes the only one you frequent after trying the others.  People are rabid about their dog stand.

  You called it right on that one wolf,  as you know,  the RI. state line is only about a quarter of a mile from my house,  and the first Weinner joint is about a half mile down that street,  two blocks away is another,  and another mile up the road is three more dinners that specialize in NY style hot dogs,  about midway in between is the Castle Lunch that makes the best "regular" grilled hot dogs in the state.
  When I was a kid my folks would get there Weinners at one or the other of the dinners at the end of Main street,  their favorites were from the New York lunch,  or the Coney Island dinner,  and naturally for years after I was married I'd get mine at the same places,  A new place opened up not far from my place about ten years ago and I gave it a try,  I've been going there ever since,  not becuse they are any better,  just closer.   :)

  But your point about developing a loyalty to one vender is spot on.
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Chili
« Reply #22 on: August 06, 2012, 08:38:55 AM »
Here is something you might not know about chili :D

In Spanish, the "chile" refers to a chile pepper and "carne" means meat. The first documented recipe for "chile con carne" is dated September 2, 1519. The ingredients were boiled tomatoes, salt, chiles and meat. Bernal Diaz del Castillo, one of Hernan Cortez's Captains and the source of the recipe, states in his book, that the Cholulan Indians, allied with the Aztecs, were so confident of victory in a battle against the Conquistadors the following day that they had "already prepared cauldrons of tomatoes, salt and chiles" in anticipation of a victory feast. The one missing ingredient, the meat, was to be furnished by the Conquistadors themselves: their own flesh. (The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico--Bernal Diaz del Castillo)

Yum!!
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #23 on: August 06, 2012, 08:53:55 AM »
Here is something you might not know about chili :D

In Spanish, the "chile" refers to a chile pepper and "carne" means meat. The first documented recipe for "chile con carne" is dated September 2, 1519. The ingredients were boiled tomatoes, salt, chiles and meat. Bernal Diaz del Castillo, one of Hernan Cortez's Captains and the source of the recipe, states in his book, that the Cholulan Indians, allied with the Aztecs, were so confident of victory in a battle against the Conquistadors the following day that they had "already prepared cauldrons of tomatoes, salt and chiles" in anticipation of a victory feast. The one missing ingredient, the meat, was to be furnished by the Conquistadors themselves: their own flesh. (The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico--Bernal Diaz del Castillo)

Yum!!

  That my friend is a most interesting fact of history that I hadn't heard before,  thanks for this post,  I do enjoy history,  especially those related to the origins of those things that are common to most of us today.
  Although i'll continue to stay with my more contemporary recipes  :),  it's a great fact to keep in mind as a conversation dropper when in a discussion about Chili.
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Chili
« Reply #24 on: August 06, 2012, 09:09:30 AM »
Not to be morbid, but I wonder if the original recipe included organ meats.  Also pork would be the closest meat to the original.  Don't ever ask how I know that :D
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Chili
« Reply #25 on: August 06, 2012, 09:53:35 AM »
Not to be morbid, but I wonder if the original recipe included organ meats.  Also pork would be the closest meat to the original.  Don't ever ask how I know that :D

As to pork being the closest thing to the original 'carne' of choice, I read in a National Geographic Magazine long ago, that cannibal tribes referred to human flesh as 'long-pig' :stir: :shrug:
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Chili
« Reply #26 on: August 06, 2012, 11:00:26 AM »
Not to be morbid, but I wonder if the original recipe included organ meats.  Also pork would be the closest meat to the original.  Don't ever ask how I know that :D

As to pork being the closest thing to the original 'carne' of choice, I read in a National Geographic Magazine long ago, that cannibal tribes referred to human flesh as 'long-pig' :stir: :shrug:

Believe me I wish I know what I know from reading National Geographic.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #27 on: August 06, 2012, 11:33:50 AM »

As to pork being the closest thing to the original 'carne' of choice, I read in a National Geographic Magazine long ago, that cannibal tribes referred to human flesh as 'long-pig' :stir: :shrug:
I don't know about cannibal tribes terminology, but "long pig" was sold in meat markets in Europe around the time of the Black Plague. There's a very famous trial involving a German butcher who sold mystery meat as "long pork" around that time.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Chili
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2012, 11:42:26 AM »
Well, since werewolf1 derailed the thread anyway, I guess one more post won't hurt :rofl:

Wikipedia has a pretty good treatise on cannibalism and its' history.....kind of interesting O:-)........and now back to the regularly scheduled program :)

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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Chili
« Reply #29 on: August 06, 2012, 12:01:12 PM »
Derail?  I just offered up the original chili recipe :D   Perhaps this is why the Spanish do not being mistaken for Mexicans.  They either have good taste or do they taste good?   >:D 
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Offline Angerland

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Re: Chili
« Reply #30 on: August 06, 2012, 02:21:34 PM »


Do you guys add anything odd to your chili's?  I've just in the last year have had cornbread with chili.  I've seen maccaroni with chili scooped on top and I've seen sour cream stirred in with green onions..


I can't share my family recipie on penalty of being disowned by my Mother.  I can share that we add cocoa powder to our chili.
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Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Chili
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2012, 03:19:10 PM »
This is my chili recipe

Seven-Chili Chile

Ingredients:
6 anchos
2 pasilla
2 coste?as
2 guajillos
4 chiles de arbol
4 pieces of bacon
4 pounds of chuck roast, cut into 1/4 inch cubes
1 large onion diced
6 cloves of garlic, crushed
1 cup of brewed coffee
1 bottle of beer
2 cups of water
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp clove
1/2 tsp allspice
1 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp cayenne
1 tablespoon cumin
(For all spices, please feel free to add more to taste throughout cooking if you like.)
2 chipotles in adobo
Salt to taste
1/4 cup masa harina
1/3 Mexican hot chocolate tablet, grated

Method:
Heat the dried chiles (anchos, pasillas, costenos, guajillos and chiles de arbol) in a dry, cast-iron skillet on medium for a couple of minutes on each side. Turn off the heat and then add enough water to the skillet to cover the chiles, and let them soak for half an hour.

Meanwhile, in a large heavy pot, such as a Dutch oven, fry up your bacon. When done, remove from pan and crumble (Don?t worry if you opt to eat a slice?you deserve it!) and leave the bacon grease in the pot (it should be about 3) tablespoons. In the pot, cook your beef in the bacon grease on medium heat, a few minutes on each side until lightly browned. You will probably have to cook these in two batches.

Remove the browned beef from the pot, and add your onions. Cook on medium until clear. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Put the beef back in the pot, and mix in the coffee, the beer, two cups of water, bacon crumbles and the dry spices. Turn the heat up to high.

Your soaking chiles should be soft by now. Drain them and discard the soaking water (it will be bitter) and place them in a blender along with the canned chipotle chiles and one cup of fresh water. Puree until nice and smooth and then add the chile puree to the chili pot.

When chili begins to boil, turn heat down to low and let simmer for five hours, stirring occasionally. Taste it once an hour, and if the flavors are too muted, feel free to add more of any of the spices. Also, it starts to get too dry, add more liquid (your choice!).

After five hours, take a Mexican hot chocolate disc, and finely grate 1/3 of it into the pot. Scoop out 1 cup of broth and add the masa harina. Mix it well and then reincorporate it back into the pot. Stir until chili is thickened.

Let the chili simmer for another half hour or so. When done, serve with cheddar, onions and tortillas.
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2012, 03:25:34 PM »
Step 8: Never read this thread on an empty stomach! Wow!
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Smokewalker

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Re: Chili
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2012, 03:32:04 PM »
Step 8: Never read this thread on an empty stomach! Wow!
:lol: Celery sticks :lol:
"Theres allot of learnin under this hat son." "Boy use what ya kin see and quit tryin a see what ya kin use." Grand pa Jesse- A real Cowboy

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2012, 03:48:33 PM »

  I'm really liking where this is going.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Chili
« Reply #35 on: August 06, 2012, 09:51:09 PM »
I cant even pronounce half of those ingredients , Smokewalker.... LOL  I think I'd glow for a month after trying that chili... uffda.

I've seen cocoa added to chili's up here. 

That was interesting to know the chili's first recipe...   1500's.. was that also the time that tomatoes were known to be ok to eat too?    Beings they (who?) thought tomatoes to be poisonous at first?   

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #36 on: August 06, 2012, 11:18:07 PM »
.....

That was interesting to know the chili's first recipe...   1500's.. was that also the time that tomatoes were known to be ok to eat too?    Beings they (who?) thought tomatoes to be poisonous at first?   

WW.
An English gentleman who was very influential published that they were toxic. They were considered unfit to eat for years in England, and that prejudice followed them to America with the colonists. This was the attitude from the early 1600's up until the mid 1700's. All during this time they continued to be popular in Spain, Italy and most of Europe. The Spanish introduced them from S. America.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Chili
« Reply #37 on: August 07, 2012, 12:46:10 AM »
I just love you guys when you put historical information out there. :)   I've always loved history , well not in highschool..but as I got older.   So the Natives knew about tomatoes alot longer then the wimpies of the English.  Ya suppose someone tried to eat one when it was green and had the hershey squirts for a few days thinking he was going to die?  ha...   

I wish I knew more about chili peppers...  used to be only jalepeno's I had to worry about.. now the list is very long , scary and dangerous... 

I ate my first jalepeno about a month ago.  Meaning it was out of a jar but on my loaded potato thing.  I was so scared.. but ate it.. got a good warm going on and ate the other six slices just fine.  Now the odd thing is.. I've had a few cravings for that taste/warmth and have no idea on how to buy some for myself afraid I'd get something TOO hot and I'd melt.

 I've grown jalepeno's..but never ate them.  Always had a home for them when picked.    ANd this year..when I want some.. the deer cleaned me out.   Murpheys law I guess.... :S

And I'm pretty sure I make THE wimpiest chili ever.... lol   

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Chili
« Reply #38 on: August 14, 2012, 07:24:57 AM »
I just love you guys when you put historical information out there. :)   I've always loved history , well not in highschool..but as I got older.   So the Natives knew about tomatoes alot longer then the wimpies of the English.  Ya suppose someone tried to eat one when it was green and had the hershey squirts for a few days thinking he was going to die?  ha...   

I wish I knew more about chili peppers...  used to be only jalepeno's I had to worry about.. now the list is very long , scary and dangerous... 

I ate my first jalepeno about a month ago.  Meaning it was out of a jar but on my loaded potato thing.  I was so scared.. but ate it.. got a good warm going on and ate the other six slices just fine.  Now the odd thing is.. I've had a few cravings for that taste/warmth and have no idea on how to buy some for myself afraid I'd get something TOO hot and I'd melt.

 I've grown jalepeno's..but never ate them.  Always had a home for them when picked.    ANd this year..when I want some.. the deer cleaned me out.   Murpheys law I guess.... :S

And I'm pretty sure I make THE wimpiest chili ever.... lol   

WW.

   Marchia,   try this simple recipe to get started,  there's nothing exotic in it,  and you can make it as mild or hot as you like.

   Ingredients
   ___________

    2-lbs. ground chuck.
    2-med. bell peppers (green & yellow).
    1-med. yellow onion.
    1- stalk of cellery.
    1/2- small can of tomatoe paste.
    1-large can of diced tomatoes.
    3-cans of beans (pinto, red kidney, black beans).
    1-bag of tortia chips.

    ground Cumin.
    Chili powder.
    salt & pepper.
    bottle of good hot sauce.
    Caynne pepper or red pepper flakes.
    Bay leave (0ptional)

   **directions:
   _____________
 
  * Brown the meat,  salt & Pepper,  i-tsp each of cumin and chili powder,  and set aside.
  * chop up the peppers, cellery, and onions to 1/2" dice. and sautee untill 1/2 cooked.
  * Add the diced tomatoes and the tomatoe paste and bring to a simmer.
  * Add the browned meat and continue to simmer for 10 minutes.
  * Add 1-tbsp of Cumin and 2-tbsp. of Chili powder.
  *  Continue to simmer until veggies are tender but  eldente.
 
  ** Adjust seasonings to taste.

  * Drain and add beans.
 
  ** Adjust heat and taste using red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper or hot sauce.

  ** To thicken the chili,  crush up some tortila chips and add to the chili one half cup at a time and let disolve and chile thicken.

     Play with it a little and have fun.
 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2013, 12:27:34 PM »
Thought I'd bump this thread, rather than comment in the "Just Recipes" thread.
Moe and PW were talking about cumin spice in chili. To me, it's what makes chili taste/smell like chili, instead of spaghetti sauce.  ;) I even use cumin in my country gravy.
Another "secret ingredient" I found out about very recently is cinnamon. When my son started working in restaurants, he came home with a killer country gravy recipe, and shared the cinnamon secret.
Cinnamon by itself is bitter, so it's used sparingly. But cinnamon brings out the sugars in other ingredients, like tomato sauce/paste, the beans, and the peppers. It adds a bit of sweetness to the chili without the raw carbs of processed sugar.
FWIW....
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline wolfy

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Re: Chili
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2013, 12:52:09 PM »
Yeah, kinda' my modus operendi, too.......oregano in the marinara sauce and quite a bit of cumin in the chili.  I always add a couple of dashes of cinnamon to chili to enhance its 'nose', but not enough to actually identify it as a flavor......that's when the line is crossed, IMHO :-\.   If I have some baking chocolate on hand, I will grate a little of that into the chili, too.  Even a little strong coffee added to the mix can sometimes add depth to the flavors, but there's usually none left by the time I'm done guzzling it in the mornings :coffee:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #41 on: January 05, 2013, 01:22:58 PM »
...  Even a little strong coffee added to the mix can sometimes add depth to the flavors, but there's usually none left by the time I'm done guzzling it in the mornings
 :coffee:
There are quite a few marinades that benefit from coffee, chili being an obvious one. If you really get adventurous, try substituting strong black coffee in a baking recipe that calls for plain water.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline wolfy

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Re: Chili
« Reply #42 on: January 05, 2013, 01:38:46 PM »
...  Even a little strong coffee added to the mix can sometimes add depth to the flavors, but there's usually none left by the time I'm done guzzling it in the mornings
 :coffee:
There are quite a few marinades that benefit from coffee, chili being an obvious one. If you really get adventurous, try substituting strong black coffee in a baking recipe that calls for plain water.

We use it in lots of things, but GOOD homemade chocolate frosting becomes sheer ambrosia from the addition of 'espresso-strength' coffee, if you've not tried it, yet  :thumbsup:   Simple powdered sugar frosting for angelfood cake benefits tremendously from the addition of a little coffee, too  O:-)
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Chili
« Reply #43 on: January 05, 2013, 01:57:59 PM »
...  Even a little strong coffee added to the mix can sometimes add depth to the flavors, but there's usually none left by the time I'm done guzzling it in the mornings
 :coffee:
There are quite a few marinades that benefit from coffee, chili being an obvious one. If you really get adventurous, try substituting strong black coffee in a baking recipe that calls for plain water.

We use it in lots of things, but GOOD homemade chocolate frosting becomes sheer ambrosia from the addition of 'espresso-strength' coffee, if you've not tried it, yet  :thumbsup:   Simple powdered sugar frosting for angelfood cake benefits tremendously from the addition of a little coffee, too  O:-)
We're wandering far afield from chili, but the next frosting you make try your espresso coffee and a jigger of Cream de Cacao liqueur.  :shocked:
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!