Author Topic: Drying foods  (Read 13661 times)

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Offline Moe M.

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Drying foods
« on: August 28, 2012, 05:35:27 AM »

  I'm not sure where this belongs,  here, the country skills section,  or the Help thread,  so if it's in the wrong place i'm sure PW will take care of it.

  I've dried fresh foods before,  but I'm wondering about frozen foods like berries or corn,  or even meats that have been prepared and frozen.
  My question is,  do they have to be  thawed first,  or can they go right from the freezer to the dehydrator ?
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Offline werewolf won

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2012, 06:40:05 AM »
Fruits and the like will defrost in minutes, and I would defrost them on layers of paper towels to absorb as much water as you can, kind of start the dehydration process even before you turn on the machine.

Meat you will slice up pretty thin so being partially frozen will help, but it too will defrost pretty quickly, and the more water/fluid you mechanically absorb is the less energy you have to spend latter.


BTW  My wife is an organic nut.  She even buys and dehydrates organic grapes to make raisins.  Those must be about half a buck each by the time she is done :D
« Last Edit: August 28, 2012, 06:42:32 AM by werewolf won »
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2012, 08:54:37 AM »
Just keep in mind that freezing can break down the cellular structure in a lot of foods. Fruit especially because of the high water content. It's one thing to make jerky out of previously frozen meat. It's quite another to try to get dried fruit snacks by way of the freezer first.  Most veggies should be okay. I've had success with green beans, peppers and herbs.
If you have a lot of fruit you're considering, you might try puree'ing it, and making fruit roll-ups if your dehydrator is equipped with those type trays.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2012, 02:36:02 PM »
Bumped for renewed interest.
Another thread got a bit side tracked when we started talking about drying different foods, and dehydrating various things. Thought I'd bump this thread as a place to discuss the topic in general.

I started out with a Ron Popeil 4 tray dehydrator about 30 years ago. I soon got into it enough I needed a "real" appliance. I've been drying stuff and making jerky for a while now, and it has provided us with a very good method for storing foods. Not to mention my unit has "fruit roll-up trays", so I can even use it to dry finished soups, etc.

Yesterday I pulled 4 trays of dried green beans and stored them in a vacuum sealed Mason jar. I find canning jars are a good way to organize things so you can easily identify the contents. We vacuum seal (in jars) the majority of what we dry, from prunes to carrots.

I have a thread here somewhere about making powdered eggs with my dehydrator. Those went in vacuum bags.
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Offline SwampHanger

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2012, 03:18:33 PM »
And I recommend those eggs. They work out great.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2012, 03:22:31 PM »
And I recommend those eggs. They work out great.
Thanks! Glad to hear someone tried it and found the info useful.
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Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2012, 08:04:50 PM »
Bumped for renewed interest.
Another thread got a bit side tracked when we started talking about drying different foods, and dehydrating various things. Thought I'd bump this thread as a place to discuss the topic in general.

I started out with a Ron Popeil 4 tray dehydrator about 30 years ago. I soon got into it enough I needed a "real" appliance. I've been drying stuff and making jerky for a while now, and it has provided us with a very good method for storing foods. Not to mention my unit has "fruit roll-up trays", so I can even use it to dry finished soups, etc.

Yesterday I pulled 4 trays of dried green beans and stored them in a vacuum sealed Mason jar. I find canning jars are a good way to organize things so you can easily identify the contents. We vacuum seal (in jars) the majority of what we dry, from prunes to carrots.

I have a thread here somewhere about making powdered eggs with my dehydrator. Those went in vacuum bags.
Good bump. Thanks OP.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #7 on: September 11, 2012, 10:28:18 AM »
There's been a lot of talk in the jerky thread about drying, and dehydrating.
Just passing this info on. Of all the books I've read and own, this one by Diana Delong is the most comprehensive, and simplest book I've found. Highly recommend it.

http://www.amazon.com/Nesco-HP-9-How-Foods-Book/dp/B000UZG1Z8/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1347379490&sr=8-7&keywords=how+to+dry+foods


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Offline Bearhunter

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Drying foods
« Reply #8 on: September 11, 2012, 11:04:55 AM »
We simply just dry stuff:
Jerky, biltong, peppers, etc. on racks 'up stairs' in our loft area. It works exceptionally well with wood heat.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #9 on: September 11, 2012, 11:10:27 AM »
We simply just dry stuff:
Jerky, biltong, peppers, etc. on racks 'up stairs' in our loft area. It works exceptionally well with wood heat.
I can't get away with that. Too much dust. Plus my cabin is a mouse magnet.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #10 on: September 11, 2012, 11:19:47 AM »
We simply just dry stuff:
Jerky, biltong, peppers, etc. on racks 'up stairs' in our loft area. It works exceptionally well with wood heat.
I can't get away with that. Too much dust. Plus my cabin is a mouse magnet.

  Trap 'em and send them to Max,  he'd be happy for the 'horseodurves'.   :)
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Offline Bearhunter

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Drying foods
« Reply #11 on: September 11, 2012, 11:35:42 AM »
We simply just dry stuff:
Jerky, biltong, peppers, etc. on racks 'up stairs' in our loft area. It works exceptionally well with wood heat.
I can't get away with that. Too much dust. Plus my cabin is a mouse magnet.
A little dust never hurt anyone.
Just adds a little flavor :D :p
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #12 on: September 11, 2012, 01:58:43 PM »
Has anyone dried summer squash?   If so..   could you tell me what steps you take for prepping the veggie for the dryer and how do you use them in the dried state?   

Zuccinni and yellow crookneck.

Oh..and I've interest in winter squash too.. pumpkin, butternut ect.

WW.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2012, 05:14:43 PM »
Has anyone dried summer squash?   If so..   could you tell me what steps you take for prepping the veggie for the dryer and how do you use them in the dried state?   

Zuccinni and yellow crookneck.

Oh..and I've interest in winter squash too.. pumpkin, butternut ect.

WW.
According to everything I've read, Winter Squash is not recommended for drying. Better to can it for pie fillings, etc.

Zucchini: Wash, peel and either cut into 1/4"-3/8" chunks, grate, or slice smaller ones 3/16"-3/8" thick for chips.
For rehydrating and cooking, steam blanch for 2-3 minutes. For chips, don't blanch, just sprinkle with seasoned salt, or BBQ sauce before drying. Serve the chips with your favorite herb dip.
Dry at 140o for 1-2 hours, then reduce heat to 130o until tough to brittle.
Chips stored at room temperature should be used within a week.
General Quality: Poor to Fair.

(Ed note: I've made chips. Chewy, even when vacuum sealed. Shredded/grated zucchini lasts a loooong time, and can be rehydrated for bread making. )

Now, WW, if you really have a lot of zucchini to burn, I just canned 8 pints of the most fantastic zucchini-mustard-onion pickles you'd ever want to taste!  The mustard was homemade from whole mustard seed. If the zucchini pieces were cut smaller, it would be a spicy sweet relish!  Oh, my....! It's great.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2012, 06:20:34 PM »
I dont have zukes now...but I have a feeling I may be called upon to come get some.    I did forget about shreds.... Those do work good in bread/muffin mixes.   My favorite way with zukes is to slow fry in butter.   

Do share your recipe in the recipe section .. :)   I may go looking for it later if I get overwhelmed by zukes.

Now for canning pumpkin...  I've read its a bad idea now.   The mush wont let the heat get high enough in the center of the jar.    To dense Ball says.     Can pumpkin be mushed up after rehydrating shreds?   

Now butternuts, acorns, and table queens I do mush and freeze in 2 cup increments.  :) 

I've not tried the chip idea.  I may do that this year if I can. 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #15 on: September 11, 2012, 06:51:05 PM »
....
Now for canning pumpkin...  I've read its a bad idea now.   The mush wont let the heat get high enough in the center of the jar.    ...
For pumpkin, acorn, buttercup,butternut, banana, Golden Delicious, and Hubbard squash:

Remove rind and seeds. Cut into 1" cubes. Do not mash!
Place in stainless steel pot, just cover with water and bring to a 2 minute boil. Heated through, but not soft.
Drain and discard liquid.
Pack into hot jars Adjust head space to 1" with fresh boiling water.
1/2 tsp salt per pint, 1 tsp salt per quart (optional)
Pressure can at 10 psi (adjusting for your altitude).
Process pints for 55 minutes, and quarts for 90 minutes.

Hope that helps......
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Offline kanukkarhu

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #16 on: September 11, 2012, 08:33:44 PM »
Man! I'm AMAZED at the info in these threads! GREAT stuff guys! :thumbsup: Thanks!
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #17 on: September 11, 2012, 09:44:54 PM »
ahh so thats how folks are getting past the 'no no-dont do that' on pumpkin canning.    Good thinking. :)  Now I'll have to go gets me some punkins......   

Thanks OP.

And your so right KK.  :)


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2012, 03:59:37 PM »
Lesson learned very recently....

Do not put in a fresh air wick in the same plug-in that the dehydrator with apples is running off of.

Not unless you want apples to taste like Ocean Mist......

Maybe I should have picked the cinnamon/vanilla scent...


Phew.

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2012, 04:25:56 PM »
Lesson learned very recently....

Do not put in a fresh air wick in the same plug-in that the dehydrator with apples is running off of.

Not unless you want apples to taste like Ocean Mist......

Maybe I should have picked the cinnamon/vanilla scent...


Phew.

WW.
Okay...now that's FUNNY! I know it's not funny, but it was humorous.  ;)
Does that go along with not putting your wife's bathrobe in the dryer with your hunting camo? Of course, it was easy to find her in the dark with the doe scent.
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Offline wolfy

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2012, 04:58:10 PM »

Okay...now that's FUNNY! I know it's not funny, but it was humorous.  ;)
Does that go along with not putting your wife's bathrobe in the dryer with your hunting camo? Of course, it was easy to find her in the dark with the doe scent.


I COULD say something here, but discretion and good manners prevents it >:D
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Offline Bearhunter

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Drying foods
« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2012, 05:14:55 PM »

Okay...now that's FUNNY! I know it's not funny, but it was humorous.  ;)
Does that go along with not putting your wife's bathrobe in the dryer with your hunting camo? Of course, it was easy to find her in the dark with the doe scent.


I COULD say something here, but discretion and good manners prevents it >:D

:D :D....
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2012, 08:03:52 PM »
LOL   OP.. and of course the lil fuzzballs on your camo helps you blend in better?   hah!

I opened up the bag again to see if its really strong in perfume.. and it is.   I guess I made my own pot-pouri...   

Did up another 9 trays tonight.  UNPLUGGED all scenters in this house this time.


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2012, 10:16:32 PM »
Ok..another apple drying question:

Would I be making a serious sticky mess if I shook my apple pieces in a sugar/cinnamon mix before laying on the trays to dry?   Will the sugar cause me problems with the heat I start out with?    I had this thought to do this so the apples would be ready for a crisp or pie by just soaking in hot water. 

Anyone try this and have advice?

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #24 on: September 13, 2012, 07:49:43 AM »
Ok..another apple drying question:

Would I be making a serious sticky mess if I shook my apple pieces in a sugar/cinnamon mix before laying on the trays to dry?   Will the sugar cause me problems with the heat I start out with?    I had this thought to do this so the apples would be ready for a crisp or pie by just soaking in hot water. 

Anyone try this and have advice?

WW.

  I've never tried it with fruit,  but i have rubbed sugar on my beef strips when making jerky and haven't had a problem,  I'm pretty sure your dehydrator doesn't get hot enough to melt the sugar,  and since the apple slices are being slow dried I don't see them weeping very much juice.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #25 on: September 13, 2012, 09:46:06 AM »
Thank you , Moe.   :)     I'll give a tray a try and see how they turn out.      I just had this thought on how cool it would be to grab 6 apple / sugr/cinn slices..rehydrate out there in the 'field' and putting those slices in bannock or simular.

WW. 
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #26 on: September 13, 2012, 10:09:25 AM »
Thank you , Moe.   :)     I'll give a tray a try and see how they turn out.      I just had this thought on how cool it would be to grab 6 apple / sugr/cinn slices..rehydrate out there in the 'field' and putting those slices in bannock or simular.

WW.
My feeble mind tells me the cinnamon/sugar coating would wash off during re-hydration. Probably just being a worry-wort.
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #27 on: September 13, 2012, 10:12:33 AM »
but but but.....    aaaak, OP....      Apples would suck it up........right?      Right?      This has just got to work...I'm hankerin an apple pasty thingy.....      :)


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline wolfy

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #28 on: September 13, 2012, 10:25:16 AM »
Why not experience life on the edge and try it on one tray ???
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #29 on: September 13, 2012, 10:56:58 AM »
but but but.....    aaaak, OP....      Apples would suck it up........right?      Right?      This has just got to work...I'm hankerin an apple pasty thingy.....      :)


WW.
I'm always one for experimentation. If >I< was going to do it, I'd toss the apple rings in a mixture of sugar and cinnamon (like you were getting ready to make an apple pie, but with the rings). I'd let it 'marinate' overnight at room temperature, drain off any excess liquid and then put the rings on the tray. You could dust them again with a sugar/cinnamon mix, just for good measure.
But that's just me.....
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Offline WoodsWoman

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #30 on: September 13, 2012, 06:21:03 PM »
Do you think it would be ok to put some lemon juice in with the over night marinade?     If I can scrounge up a little bit more energy tonight I'll try that. :)

I'm also going to try something else as an experiment....

I have a big package of skin on hotdogs... amour brand I think...      Anyway they are cooked and I want to slice across thinly and see how they dry.    If its like pepperoni or not.  I'll still keep the dried slices in the freezer but it would be neat to take a few out for a day trip and use them in a meal somehow. 

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #31 on: September 13, 2012, 09:47:43 PM »
Do you think it would be ok to put some lemon juice in with the over night marinade?     If I can scrounge up a little bit more energy tonight I'll try that. :)

I'm also going to try something else as an experiment....

I have a big package of skin on hotdogs... amour brand I think...      Anyway they are cooked and I want to slice across thinly and see how they dry.    If its like pepperoni or not.  I'll still keep the dried slices in the freezer but it would be neat to take a few out for a day trip and use them in a meal somehow. 

WW.
I'd keep the hotdog slices at least 1/4" thick, like you would slice meat for jerky. Let us know how it works out!
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Batch o' jerky
« Reply #32 on: May 15, 2013, 09:26:29 PM »
I finally got around to making some jerky today. I'm planning a trip the end of the month, and my daughter has been insisting upon some of 'Dad's jerky' for trail snacks.  :P

This was a bare-bones-no-frills recipe.
Started with about 1 cup of dark soy sauce.
A couple tbs of Worchestershire sauce
1/4 cu brown sugar
Generous sprinkling of granulated garlic
(A tsp or two of Liquid Smoke would have been nice, but didn't have any on hand)

The meat was a rolled sirloin tip roast. I untied it, separated the muscle groups, trimmed the fat and 'silver', and cut it cross the grain. Everything was tossed in the marinade over night, tossing half way through.  Then the slices were put on the trays and lightly sprinkled with fresh ground black pepper.

I put it in the dehydrator at 165oF for 3 hours, then turned it down to 135o until is showed white when I tried to bend it. It only took about 9 hours.

Not a fancy recipe, but tasty enough. A 5# roast filled up 6 dehydrator trays.

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Offline wolfy

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #33 on: May 15, 2013, 09:54:50 PM »
Sounds GOOD to me!   Not everything's got to be salty & hot as hellfire to be good.....seems like most jerky samples that people try to shove off on me are. >:(
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #34 on: May 15, 2013, 10:02:56 PM »
Sounds GOOD to me!   Not everything's got to be salty & hot as hellfire to be good.....seems like most jerky samples that people try to shove off on me are. >:(

The soy sauce gives PLENTY of salt, and the Worchestershire sauce has lots of herbs in it. Sometimes I'll throw in a handful of Italian Seasoning. Both are the lazy man's way of avoiding adding 2 dozen separate ingredients.  8)   The black pepper give plenty of extra 'bite' without getting stupid about it.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #35 on: May 17, 2013, 09:40:37 AM »
Sounds GOOD to me!   Not everything's got to be salty & hot as hellfire to be good.....seems like most jerky samples that people try to shove off on me are. >:(
Sounds GOOD to me!   Not everything's got to be salty & hot as hellfire to be good.....seems like most jerky samples that people try to shove off on me are. >:(

The soy sauce gives PLENTY of salt, and the Worchestershire sauce has lots of herbs in it. Sometimes I'll throw in a handful of Italian Seasoning. Both are the lazy man's way of avoiding adding 2 dozen separate ingredients.  8)   The black pepper give plenty of extra 'bite' without getting stupid about it.

  Too many people think that it's the seasoning that creates the taste in most prepared foods,  actually seasoning are supposed to enhance or bring out the flavor of the food not mask it,  if it does it's ruined as far as I'm concerned.

  I'm with both of you on that issue,  just enough and simple is good,  too hot and too salty is "getting stupid".    :thumbsup:
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Offline xj35s

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #36 on: August 04, 2013, 11:58:36 AM »
I don't want to start a new thread. I have a simple question.

My food dehydrator is an American Harvest. It has four trays. There isn't an adjustment for temperature. I plugged it in empty and put a thermometer in one of the vents in the lid. It got up to 170* F. I'm thinking with a bunch of food dehydrating it won't get that high.

I want to do the eggs. Will the high temp ruin them? What happens if they dry too quick?
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #37 on: August 04, 2013, 12:17:45 PM »
I don't want to start a new thread. I have a simple question.

My food dehydrator is an American Harvest. It has four trays. There isn't an adjustment for temperature. I plugged it in empty and put a thermometer in one of the vents in the lid. It got up to 170* F. I'm thinking with a bunch of food dehydrating it won't get that high.

I want to do the eggs. Will the high temp ruin them? What happens if they dry too quick?

  That sounds a lot like mine,  I've never checked the temp output on mine,  I'm guessing at about 140F.
   
  I use mine for just about everything with good results,  the two things I don't use it for is hamburger gravel and eggs,  I have good luck with dried burger meat in the oven of my stove on the lowest setting (160) with the oven door open after a couple of hours with the door closed.
  I have never had good luck with eggs,  OP has a good thread on drying eggs,  you might want to check it out,  I have a problem with bringing eggs up to a proper temp to kill any bad stuff that might be hiding in them,  they end up getting cooked,  so that when I put them through the food prossessor after they have dried out I end up with granulated cooked eggs.
  What I want to end up with is powdered eggs that will reconstitute with water,  mine never do,  I'm pretty sure that there is another process involved in making powdered egg,  maybe freeze drying or something.
  Sorry I couldn't be more help,  make sure to have your solid liners in place.   :doh:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #38 on: August 04, 2013, 02:47:05 PM »
I don't want to start a new thread. I have a simple question.

My food dehydrator is an American Harvest. It has four trays. There isn't an adjustment for temperature. I plugged it in empty and put a thermometer in one of the vents in the lid. It got up to 170* F. I'm thinking with a bunch of food dehydrating it won't get that high.

I want to do the eggs. Will the high temp ruin them? What happens if they dry too quick?

Moe's 140 deg is probably a good guess. That is about average for most drying. It makes sense that a dehydrator without a thermostat would be set at that.

What I get with my dehydrated eggs is granulated whole eggs, not powdered. Sort of the difference between granulated garlic, garlic powder. They reconstitute just fine.  I found that trying to get a true 'powder' in the food mill causes the eggs to cook from the heat generated by the friction of the blades.  You don't want that.

To kill bacteria, just like with meat, the idea is to get up to 165 deg for at least 20 minutes during the first two hours of drying. My suggestion would be to put your blended eggs on the fruit trays in your dehydrator for about 1- 1 1/2 hours. Then transfer them to cookie sheets in a preheated oven (170 deg?) and give them 1/2 hour- 45 minutes to heat thoroughly. Then transfer them back into the dehydrator for the 140 deg drying temp for the next 16-18 hours. A PITA, but I'm not sure how else you could do it safely without ending up with cooked eggs like Moe.
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Offline xj35s

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #39 on: August 04, 2013, 03:12:27 PM »
My thermostat did get up over 165* I'll have to try loading it up with veggies to dry and check the temp during that.

Salmonella is the key threat with eggs right? Maybe e-coli. If the bugs don't die in the dehydrating process will they not die during the reconstituted cooking.

I'm wondering now...
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #40 on: August 04, 2013, 03:24:17 PM »
My thermostat did get up over 165* I'll have to try loading it up with veggies to dry and check the temp during that.

Salmonella is the key threat with eggs right? Maybe e-coli. If the bugs don't die in the dehydrating process will they not die during the reconstituted cooking.

I'm wondering now...

Do you have the manual with your American Harvest? Does it talk about drying herbs, or leafy veggies?  Herbs are usually dried at 80-100 deg to preserve the essential oils. The average drying temp for most things is 135-140, because plant don't carry the same risk as animal products.
I doubt your AH dehydrator defaults to anything higher than that. What is the model name/number? Maybe we can find out.

There are a lot of other bacteria and organisms that can cause food spoilage besides just the Poster Children of the FDA (e. coli, salmonella, etc.).  You might open up your dried eggs later and find them smelling like sulphur.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #41 on: August 04, 2013, 08:17:22 PM »
My thermostat did get up over 165* I'll have to try loading it up with veggies to dry and check the temp during that.

Salmonella is the key threat with eggs right? Maybe e-coli. If the bugs don't die in the dehydrating process will they not die during the reconstituted cooking.

I'm wondering now...

Do you have the manual with your American Harvest? Does it talk about drying herbs, or leafy veggies?  Herbs are usually dried at 80-100 deg to preserve the essential oils. The average drying temp for most things is 135-140, because plant don't carry the same risk as animal products.
I doubt your AH dehydrator defaults to anything higher than that. What is the model name/number? Maybe we can find out.

There are a lot of other bacteria and organisms that can cause food spoilage besides just the Poster Children of the FDA (e. coli, salmonella, etc.).  You might open up your dried eggs later and find them smelling like sulphur.

    Eggs are tough to get right,  I can't tell you how many dozens I've wasted trying to get it right,  up to about a year ago you couldn't find powdered eggs anywhere,  the bird flu stopped all imports from europe and all American production was going to MRE's for Iraq and Afganistan,  and FEMA was taking the rest.
    Now they have become more available and the cost is resonable,  I find that if I'm going to dry food I'd rather spend my time on foods that come out well for me and buy the eggs in sealed cans with a long shelf life,  I get the quality I want in the quantity that I need,  at a price I can afford.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #42 on: August 04, 2013, 08:54:09 PM »
....
    Now they have become more available and the cost is resonable,  I find that if I'm going to dry food I'd rather spend my time on foods that come out well for me and buy the eggs in sealed cans with a long shelf life,  I get the quality I want in the quantity that I need,  at a price I can afford.

Makes perfect sense, and probably the best approach, other than to just be able to say you're eating home grown eggs.  ;)   Commercial powdered eggs do have sorbates and other preservatives in them, FWIW. That's one of the reasons they have a shelf life close to the half life of plutonium.

But my situation was that when I made up my mind to get it right, I had 47 dozen eggs in my cold storage.  :shocked: :crazy:   I'd already given 20 dozen to the local food bank, and didn't want them to go to waste. Hence, out came Mr. Dehydrator. A dozen eggs fills a tray, so I was able to preserve 16 dozen eggs without too much effort. It helped a lot that I had a food mill that would grind them in to granules.

The only reason I processed them down to granule size was for ease of measurement when rehydrating. Storing them as "flakes" is just fine, but hard to measure out into a recipe that calls for 'two eggs'.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #43 on: August 05, 2013, 07:35:42 AM »
....
    Now they have become more available and the cost is resonable,  I find that if I'm going to dry food I'd rather spend my time on foods that come out well for me and buy the eggs in sealed cans with a long shelf life,  I get the quality I want in the quantity that I need,  at a price I can afford.

Makes perfect sense, and probably the best approach, other than to just be able to say you're eating home grown eggs.  ;)   Commercial powdered eggs do have sorbates and other preservatives in them, FWIW. That's one of the reasons they have a shelf life close to the half life of plutonium.

But my situation was that when I made up my mind to get it right, I had 47 dozen eggs in my cold storage.  :shocked: :crazy:   I'd already given 20 dozen to the local food bank, and didn't want them to go to waste. Hence, out came Mr. Dehydrator. A dozen eggs fills a tray, so I was able to preserve 16 dozen eggs without too much effort. It helped a lot that I had a food mill that would grind them in to granules.

The only reason I processed them down to granule size was for ease of measurement when rehydrating. Storing them as "flakes" is just fine, but hard to measure out into a recipe that calls for 'two eggs'.

  Being in your position of having the chickens and not being able to shut them off every now and then I can see your point,  for me it's mostly just being successful in trying to get them right,  We aren't hard core preppers,  we keep a good pantry and have an emergency stock that would keep us going for a few months,  so cranking out survival food is not on our "do" list.
  After the last two seasons of rain and high heat beating up the garden we downsized it quite a bit,  so we don't have to worry about canning and drying,  we consum just about everything we harvest during the season and give what little is left over to friends.
  When we were starting out things were pretty tough, as it was for most kids getting married just out of high school in 1960,  eight years into it we had four kids and a job that paid one dollar per hour,  but we got on a federal food bank program, once a month you would go to the town hall and there would be a big box of food with your name on it,  it was pretty neat and really helped with the food budget,  in the box there was large sized cans of beef, chicken,  and (hang on to your hat) spam,  canned veggies, dried beans, salt, sugar, flour, several cans of powdered eggs, dried (mashed)potatoes,  several pounds of butter and a three pound block of American cheese.
  The only stuff that wasn't real good was the potted meat, it tastted ok but wasn't great looking in your plate,  trying to find ways to hide it in dishes was a challenge,  mostly we shreadded it and added it to chili's and pasta's,   but the rest of the stuff was top shelf,  the powdered eggs were great for cooking and baking,  and for scrambled eggs,  once cooked you couldn't tell the difference between fresh and dried.
  It's too bad they did away with those programs and went to food stamps,  if poor families today were getting that same quality food every month instead of being handed a debit card that allows them to buy junk we'ed likely have a healthier society.
  Anyway, I'd just like to know how to replicate those eggs.   :shrug:
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #44 on: August 05, 2013, 09:39:41 AM »
...
  It's too bad they did away with those programs and went to food stamps,  if poor families today were getting that same quality food every month instead of being handed a debit card that allows them to buy junk we'ed likely have a healthier society....

I think it depends upon the community. These days the few folks who want to help out find it easier to donate money than products.
In Montana, the "food drives" are alive and well. There is a VA Food Bank in Kalispell for vets and their families. Mostly fresh foods that have been donated by local farmers/backyard growers.
We relied heavily on the local Pantry when we first got here with three kids, before my pension and SS kicked in. We continue to pay it back by donating what we can. The eggs is the big thing for us.
Our local Pantry runs a thrift store to raise money for products that must be purchased. Lots of gov't surplus stuff is offered. The local markets also donate things like bread, and boxed mixes.
With the economy suffering around here, some folks still find it "degrading" to go stand in a food bank line, and would rather try to qualify for food stamps.
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Offline Moe M.

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #45 on: August 05, 2013, 10:40:44 AM »
...
  It's too bad they did away with those programs and went to food stamps,  if poor families today were getting that same quality food every month instead of being handed a debit card that allows them to buy junk we'ed likely have a healthier society....

I think it depends upon the community. These days the few folks who want to help out find it easier to donate money than products.
In Montana, the "food drives" are alive and well. There is a VA Food Bank in Kalispell for vets and their families. Mostly fresh foods that have been donated by local farmers/backyard growers.
We relied heavily on the local Pantry when we first got here with three kids, before my pension and SS kicked in. We continue to pay it back by donating what we can. The eggs is the big thing for us.
Our local Pantry runs a thrift store to raise money for products that must be purchased. Lots of gov't surplus stuff is offered. The local markets also donate things like bread, and boxed mixes.
With the economy suffering around here, some folks still find it "degrading" to go stand in a food bank line, and would rather try to qualify for food stamps.

  We have many private food banks and charitable facilities that collect clothing , bedding, and furniture for the needy that are run by churches community groups in our area,  we are putting together some good chothing, blankets and household things now to donate to a couple of them,  our local Stop & Shop super market has baskets set up near the cashouts where people can donate canned goods and such, and the store kicks in a lot of food also,  I know that it really helps folks to get by especially in this poor economy.
 What I was refering to mainly was the State and Federal food stamp programs,  I understand that some people would rather have the stamps (debit cards),  but I see so many abuses of those cards every week when I do our shopping that it's irritating,  they get to the check out and all they have is junk food in their baskets and very little good real food.
 I also know for a fact that some people will let their kids go hungy by selling the "stamps" for half value for cash to by smokes, booze, and drugs, which really pisses me off,  I still think if those programs were run with surplus like they used to it would force people to use it to actually feed their kids right while helping the farmers and growers out at the same time.
 I guess it's just another sign of the throw away don't give a crap world that we live in today,  it's really too bad,  but there seems to be little that we can do about it except credit those folks who keep the charities going.
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Offline Old Philosopher

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Re: Drying foods
« Reply #46 on: August 05, 2013, 12:00:25 PM »
... but I see so many abuses of those cards every week when I do our shopping that it's irritating,  they get to the check out and all they have is junk food in their baskets and very little good real food.
...

I see this all the time. Not just food stamp clientele, but the general younger population. My own daughter is terrible that way. She says she wants to learn from her Mom, but then heads for the doughnut shop.
A whole generation (maybe two) grew up on Big Macs, and meals-in-a-box. It's no wonder the Nation has a health care problem!  My point is, they get to the checkout line with 'junk food' because they seriously don't know any better.

One of our main motives for dehydrating food is to preserve the bounty when it's seasonally available. We're borderline 'preppers', but not as fanatical as some folks. Should climate, or economic difficulties make food scarce, we don't want to be in a panic.
Drying and canning food ourselves insures (to us) the quality of the product, and doesn't depend upon electricity (freezers) to protect our groceries. Heck, it doesn't take a solar EMP to knock out the Grid, all it takes is for Mr. Whirlpool to have his compressor short out.
We have 5 freezers running right now. We rely upon them daily. But you better believe that if they failed tomorrow, we'd be canning our tails off out on the propane stove, rather than let it rot.
With dry storage, all you need to be able to do is boil water.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!