Author Topic: Coffee  (Read 45924 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Coffee
« on: October 31, 2012, 09:54:00 AM »

  I'm not sure where this question belongs,  under general discussion,  Food,  or other gear,  but here goes.

  Coffee being what it is to so many of us,  it's been discussed up, down, and sideways in a lot of threads,  so I guess one more won't hurt.
  I have for years used some form of quick coffee making method or another when backpacking or on day hunts and fishing,  car camping or week long events are not a problem, I use a full size coffee pot to brew my coffee.
  One of the best that I've used is no longer made as far as I know,  I haven't seen it on the grocers shelves in a long time,  it was made by Maxwell House Coffee,  it came in about 3" dia. flat strainer bags,  each bag was good for about eight cups of coffee,  and they were packed six or eight bags per box.
  All one had to do was get a pot of water boiling and throw in one of the bags,  bring the water back to a boil for a couple of minutes and take it off the heat,  it was something like making cowboy coffee without the messy grounds.
  But on the trail,  especially when traveling solo,  making coffee takes a bit more thought,  there's the ever simple but repulsive instant coffee (please, don't anyone suggest a brand that actually makes a good cup of coffee, none exist),  then there's the little one cup coffee bags that one steeps like tea,  those are a little better but the coffee usually ends up on the weak side no matter how long it's steeped.
  Next there's cowboy coffee,  I've had pretty good luck with a couple of methods of doing this,  which finally brings me to the meat of this possibly boring thread.
 
  Who here uses a dedicated coffee pot while hiking,  I usually use my GI canteen cup,  but that ties up one of my cook pots,  I've recently picked up a medium sized MSR SS covered pot with the folding handle ( holds a little over 16oz. or 2-cups) for my cook pot,  I'm wondering if I should invest in a real coffee pot,  a good quality stainless coffee pot, but one of the small 2-cup ones that would be easy to carry in a day pack,  i'm sure it could be used  for any number of other cooking or boiling tasks,  so it sounds like a good idea.

  Any experienced comments ?
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline madmax

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 10027
  • The Phoenix
Re: Coffee
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2012, 10:09:00 AM »
I tried using a SS coffee pot as a cook pot/coffee pot.  Everything tasted like coffee.  But maybe I didn't clean it good enough.  I use a one cup filter drip thingy now and a cook pot.
At least it's not a femur through the pelvis.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2012, 10:18:30 AM »
I remember those "doughnut" coffee bags, and used them quite a bit camping. I miss 'em, too! They had a hole in the middle, so they would drop in the basket in a regular coffee pot.
Mine's packed away, so this one it a 'web simulation' of the one I've carried on many a backpack trip. It's a 4 cup model, which we all know actually means TWO real cups of coffee.  ;)


Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Frugal Bohemian

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 621
Re: Coffee
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2012, 11:07:21 AM »
Mine's packed away, so this one it a 'web simulation' of the one I've carried on many a backpack trip. It's a 4 cup model, which we all know actually means TWO real cups of coffee.  ;)



I've been using one just like that for years, OP.  I've tried doing cowboy coffee strained through a one-cup tea basket thing....but percolated just tastes more like "camp coffee" for some reason.  Thicker and almost "chewy".

I've used the pot (minus the filter basket) to boil soups and pasta and whatnot, but it can be a bugger to clean the strainer in the spout.  So...small percolator is more or less a one-use-tool for me.
"I used to be with it, but then they changed what it was. Now what I'm with isn't it, and what's it seems weird and scary to me. It'll happen to you..."
- Abraham Jay-Jedediah "Abe" Simpson

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #4 on: October 31, 2012, 11:18:11 AM »

I've been using one just like that for years, OP.  I've tried doing cowboy coffee strained through a one-cup tea basket thing....but percolated just tastes more like "camp coffee" for some reason.  Thicker and almost "chewy".

I've used the pot (minus the filter basket) to boil soups and pasta and whatnot, but it can be a bugger to clean the strainer in the spout.  So...small percolator is more or less a one-use-tool for me.
I'm with you! I've boiled coffee, but perked coffee is worth every ounce of carry weight, IMO.
BUT....I found a second use for mine. I'd strap my billy on one side of my pack, and throw in my metal silverware. The coffee pot would get strapped on the other side of my pack, and I'd toss a half-dozen pebbles in the bottom.
Walking down the trail I sounded like a calliope, with my "bear bells" jingling.  ;D
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2012, 12:00:04 PM »
I tried using a SS coffee pot as a cook pot/coffee pot.  Everything tasted like coffee.  But maybe I didn't clean it good enough.  I use a one cup filter drip thingy now and a cook pot.

  I think my problem is that i'm too damned fussy when it comes to coffee (and most other foods as well)  :),  i've tried a couple of those one cup backpacking thingamajiggs and didn't have enough luck with them to keep 'em,  besides,  I rarely taste my first cup,  it's basically used to prime me for the second one.
  I've also given the French Press made for trail use a try,  the coffee was great but it turned out to be a bigger pain to clean than a canteen cup full of cowboy coffee grounds, and you can't keep it near the fire to keep it warm.
 Basically I'm after something that is no fuss, makes at least two cups of decent coffee,  and doesn't take up much room in my pack,  and right now that's either my Canvas LL Bean Continental pack or my Frost River Summitt bag.
 I saw a few 4-cup pots the last time I was at Pro-Bass,  I think i'll spring for one the next time i'm there. 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #6 on: October 31, 2012, 12:19:38 PM »
.....
 I saw a few 4-cup pots the last time I was at Pro-Bass,  I think i'll spring for one the next time i'm there.
I picked mine up at a Red Shield store 30 years ago for 25-cents. Allowing for inflation, you could probably score one for under $2 just to see how you like it.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #7 on: October 31, 2012, 12:21:32 PM »
I remember those "doughnut" coffee bags, and used them quite a bit camping. I miss 'em, too! They had a hole in the middle, so they would drop in the basket in a regular coffee pot.
Mine's packed away, so this one it a 'web simulation' of the one I've carried on many a backpack trip. It's a 4 cup model, which we all know actually means TWO real cups of coffee.  ;)



  I really wonder why they quit making those coffee bags,  I think they were a great idea,  especially for those people who have a problem making good coffee,  they were a no brainer,  check water level, boil water, throw in the bag,  count to fifty and remove from heat,  pour coffee.
  But yes, that's the kind of pot i'm talking about,  when empty it can hold your coffee, sugar, and a small can of evaporated milk,  two for an over nighter.   :)
  At my local Pro-Bass they had several that size,  two stainless models,  one a little thicker than the other and one made out of aluminum which was pretty light weight.
  The heavyest and most costly of the three had a screw in glass perc. cap,  the other two had those caps with the ears on them that fall out a lot.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #8 on: October 31, 2012, 12:28:35 PM »
.....
 I saw a few 4-cup pots the last time I was at Pro-Bass,  I think i'll spring for one the next time i'm there.
I picked mine up at a Red Shield store 30 years ago for 25-cents. Allowing for inflation, you could probably score one for under $2 just to see how you like it.

  Now that's an idea,  there's a Savers used everything store and a Sally's within ten minutes from me,  it's been so long since I stopped in I forgot about them,  I'll check them out,  also have to stop at Wallyworld for a new BlueFoam pad,  i'll check for a pot there as well.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6797
  • Minnesota
Re: Coffee
« Reply #9 on: October 31, 2012, 12:37:13 PM »
Hey, Moe,  Would these work for you?    Just fill them with your coffee instead?   Theres two different sizes to use.   You could fill them in about an hour of your time and maybe keep them in the freezer so they wont go bad (stale) on you between trips?  Or make up fresh ones just before your outting?

http://www.herbco.com/p-1090-press-n-brew-50-pk-small-82525-in-x-275-in.aspx

:)


WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #10 on: October 31, 2012, 12:59:11 PM »
  I really wonder why they quit making those coffee bags,  I think they were a great idea,  especially for those people who have a problem making good coffee,  they were a no brainer,  ...
It's our 'hurry up' world! Drip coffee makers, French presses, Starbucks! Hardly anyone even owns an electric percolator anymore, let along a stove top one. Nobody wants to "waste time" waiting for real coffee to perk.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6797
  • Minnesota
Re: Coffee
« Reply #11 on: October 31, 2012, 01:02:35 PM »
I  can relate to that one OP.   When my drip quit a little over a month ago I was using that coffee pot like you guys have shown above.     Lordy.. I about fell asleep at the counter waiting...waiting.. . waiting.... 

FINALLY got a new drip ...whew...

I didnt feel comfortable to walk away from the stove when I was using that pot.  With the drip I can continue with some of my morning chores while it brewed in those FIVE mins..... :)

WW.
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #12 on: October 31, 2012, 01:09:32 PM »
Hey, Moe,  Would these work for you?    Just fill them with your coffee instead?   Theres two different sizes to use.   You could fill them in about an hour of your time and maybe keep them in the freezer so they wont go bad (stale) on you between trips?  Or make up fresh ones just before your outting?

http://www.herbco.com/p-1090-press-n-brew-50-pk-small-82525-in-x-275-in.aspx

:)


WW.

  Good find,  I'll look into it,  the large bags look like they might work with coffee,  somewhat like the donuts of coffee that OP and I were talking about,  i;ll have to watch the video to see whats involved in sealing the bags after they are packed,  they suggest heat and pressure but don't explain the process in the script,  but might show it in the video.

  Thanks.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #13 on: October 31, 2012, 01:33:27 PM »
  I really wonder why they quit making those coffee bags,  I think they were a great idea,  especially for those people who have a problem making good coffee,  they were a no brainer,  ...
It's our 'hurry up' world! Drip coffee makers, French presses, Starbucks! Hardly anyone even owns an electric percolator anymore, let along a stove top one. Nobody wants to "waste time" waiting for real coffee to perk.

  Oh, I know it and it just pisses me off sometimes because it reminds me that i'm getting to be like a cast off kids toy,  fun to be with, but not really with it any more  :),  I visited my buddy who runs a small gun shop on Friday,  he just got back after a three week recovery from by-pass surgery (now a proud member of the zipper club),  anyway I ask him if he wanted a coffee when I walked in and he said,  "why no,  but i'll buy you one" as he proudly pointed over to a new coffee maker.
  It looked like a little R-2 D-2 robot, I think it was named Krug,  and there wern't no pot under his little head,  so I asked where the hell does the coffee come from,  so he hands me this little plastic cup thingy and says "from here",  so I thanked him and told him that weren't near a full cup of joe,  then he pops the head open on the robot and stiks that little cup in a hole in the head, puts a cup under it and pressed a botton,  the thing made a growning noise and sure as $hit,  it spit out a cup of coffee,  and it was pretty good stuff.
  So yes,  it was quick,  it was good,  and there weren't any grounds or coffee pot to clean up after,  but one of the most important things about coffee fixin' was missing,  the smell of fresh perked coffee.
  I'd miss that too much to have one of those 'Bots' in my home.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Highlife

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1260
  • Sometimes more is more.
Re: Coffee
« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2012, 01:41:59 PM »
Well, I don't have many suggestions for trail coffee, because I used 3-in-1 instant coffee...

But, for home coffee, I've tried percolator (my parents have been using theirs since 1980), drip, "fancy" drip, espresso, italian percolator (stovetop), french press, one-cup drip, cowboy, and Keurig. I LOVE good coffee, and don't know why people insist on drinking McDonalds, Dunkin', or 7-Eleven coffee...

I will say that my absolute favorite is french press. I grind my beans just before adding the boiling water, stir, and let steep for 3 or 4 minutes. It's like cowboy coffee without all the grinds. It's strong, dark, and retains all of the natural oils. Best of all, it's simple and works great for a single person (my wife doesn't drink coffee).

To add to that, we use a Keurig at work, where each employee prefers a different roast. It works really well for that, and prevents us from having a drip carafe burning on the hotplate all day. I will disagree though about the smell, I can smell the fresh brewed coffee in the next room from that puppy. mmmm...dark magic. Excuse me, I'm gonna go make a cup right now!
What's that smell?

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2012, 03:03:35 PM »
Well, I don't have many suggestions for trail coffee, because I used 3-in-1 instant coffee...

But, for home coffee, I've tried percolator (my parents have been using theirs since 1980), drip, "fancy" drip, espresso, italian percolator (stovetop), french press, one-cup drip, cowboy, and Keurig. I LOVE good coffee, and don't know why people insist on drinking McDonalds, Dunkin', or 7-Eleven coffee...

I will say that my absolute favorite is french press. I grind my beans just before adding the boiling water, stir, and let steep for 3 or 4 minutes. It's like cowboy coffee without all the grinds. It's strong, dark, and retains all of the natural oils. Best of all, it's simple and works great for a single person (my wife doesn't drink coffee).

To add to that, we use a Keurig at work, where each employee prefers a different roast. It works really well for that, and prevents us from having a drip carafe burning on the hotplate all day. I will disagree though about the smell, I can smell the fresh brewed coffee in the next room from that puppy. mmmm...dark magic. Excuse me, I'm gonna go make a cup right now!

  Maybe it's my old nose,  or the fact that I was in a gun shop with all the smells associated with that invironment,  but I did notice the absense of coffee in the air.
  I had a french press for a while,  the coffee was good,  and I did grind my own coffee as well,  but I didn't miss it when the glass carafe broke,  I usually have three cups of coffee spread out through the morning (usually between eight and ten am) and the french press cools off to fast,  I did buy a thermos carafe and that helped.
  For the past four or five years i've been using a Mr. Coffee drip machine,  it's a high end model with a bunch of bells and whistles,  half of them I don't know how to use (i'm not much for reading instruction manuals),  but it makes great coffee and it keeps it hot for a couple of hours,  so it's perfect for my needs.
  As for take out coffee,  most Dunkin' Donuts shops make decent coffee,  Honey Dew is a close second,  a bit weak but still ok,  the absolute worst coffee shop coffee in my area is also the most expensive,  and that's Starbucks,  if it weren't for yuppies that don't mind spending five bucks a cup for dishwater just so they can be seen with a Starbucks cup in their hands they would never have stayed in business.
  There are two kinds of people who can be counted on to know good coffee, Cops, and Truck drivers,  I know plenty of both,  and none of them would take you up on your offer to buy them a coffee at Starbucks.

  But I'm still looking for a good trail coffee pot.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2012, 03:30:34 PM »
Speaking of coffee....more than pots...I'm wondering if anyone remembers the coffee that Hyatt House Motels and Restaurants used to use back in the 60's?
It was labeled as "Black and Black's Connoisseur's Choice". It was only sold through restaurant supply houses and it was THE BEST coffee I've ever tasted, then or now. It was a fine, dark grind, came in 3 lb foil pouches, and is the only coffee I actually preferred black (no sweetener). Rich, flavorful, nutty, and that 'fresh brewed' aroma stayed with the cup until you finished it. <sigh>
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline madmax

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 10027
  • The Phoenix
Re: Coffee
« Reply #17 on: October 31, 2012, 04:22:42 PM »
My late grandma's favorite.  She called it that "rotten ass" coffee from Hawaii.

http://www.badasscoffee.com/
At least it's not a femur through the pelvis.

Offline SIXFOOTER

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 963
  • Wandering Smartass
Re: Coffee
« Reply #18 on: October 31, 2012, 05:18:45 PM »
Car camping I have a dedicated Cabellas SS coffee pot, backpacking I use the larger of the 2 pots in my Brunton set for making cowboy coffee. I use Pilon, Cuban coffee, its coffee powder basically and makes a fine cup
Maker of all things Archaic, Hoarder of Gear and Fluent speaker of BS
Sixfooter got bit by a snake like that once, then after 4 agonizing days... The snake finally died....

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #19 on: October 31, 2012, 06:14:48 PM »
Speaking of coffee....more than pots...I'm wondering if anyone remembers the coffee that Hyatt House Motels and Restaurants used to use back in the 60's?
It was labeled as "Black and Black's Connoisseur's Choice". It was only sold through restaurant supply houses and it was THE BEST coffee I've ever tasted, then or now. It was a fine, dark grind, came in 3 lb foil pouches, and is the only coffee I actually preferred black (no sweetener). Rich, flavorful, nutty, and that 'fresh brewed' aroma stayed with the cup until you finished it. <sigh>


  If you like fine grind dark coffee,  give Melitta coffee a try,  my favorites are their Breakfast Blend,  and their Dark Roast Columbian,  because it's a fine grind it doesn't take as much coffee volume wise per cup,  so read the directions.
  But it's just what you discribed,  I use it exclusively, at home and in the woods.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Barbarossa Bushman

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1173
  • A sense of humor is a good thing
Re: Coffee
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2012, 09:33:29 PM »
One of my favorite topics. Maybe you could try a diner or restaurant for the coffee in the filter bag. I think thats what a lot of them use still but they might be too big.

I have an old stainless steel French Press that Starbucks made about 13 years ago and sometimes lug it with me if I want great coffee. The taste is my favorite as no filter catches those great tasting oils. Usually I just make cowboy coffee and filter it through this.

http://www.gsioutdoors.com/products/pdp/h2jo/
"When times get rough and times get hard, the fat get skinny and the skinny die. Good thing you had a little fat on you when you did." An old friend

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2012, 10:45:17 PM »
You wanna make cowboy coffee, without the grounds, just carry one of these. This one weighs about 1 oz.




Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #22 on: November 03, 2012, 08:55:09 PM »
You wanna make cowboy coffee, without the grounds, just carry one of these. This one weighs about 1 oz.



  I've got a couple of those baskets,  I got them with my last two drip coffee makers,  but they are a pain to use,  actually Marcia is the one who has a problem with grounds,  the way I make my cowboy coffee the grounds settle fine and as long as I don't take the last sip out of the bottom of the cup or the last little bit in the bottom of the pot i'm good.
 The idea of getting a dedicated coffee pot is that I usually carry a GI canteen cup,  a medium MSR covered pot,  and nesting Glazer cup with my SS water bottle,  on overnite trips I take my GI mess kit as well as leave the Canteen cup at home.
 I think i'd like to have a dedicated pot for the convienence of have two full cups on the fire,  and i'm also considering buying a Kuplika to keep from burning my lips, that is starting to get old now.   :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline MATT CHAOS

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 3856
  • M.E.S.H. Knives
Re: Coffee
« Reply #23 on: November 09, 2012, 12:13:57 PM »
Moe M:  I use a coffee percolator pot when I am camping.  (I think it is a coleman brand).  It is large but is overkill if it is just me and a person or 2. 
A female scout leader, introduced me to a French coffee press.  French coffee press  It makes a cup or 2 of really good tasting coffee.  They don't seam to be expensive and may be something you want to try when all you need is a cup or 2.

 :)
« Last Edit: November 09, 2012, 02:45:39 PM by MATT CHAOS »
Jontok Bushy Approved    Member#28   
1st Aid/CPR/AED Wilderness 1st Aid Instructor

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2012, 05:29:47 PM »
Moe M:  I use a coffee percolator pot when I am camping.  (I think it is a coleman brand).  It is large but is overkill if it is just me and a person or 2. 
A female scout leader, introduced me to a French coffee press.  French coffee press  It makes a cup or 2 of really good tasting coffee.  They don't seam to be expensive and may be something you want to try when all you need is a cup or 2.

 :)

   Thanks for the suggestion Matt,  I did have a French Press and it did make excellent coffee,  it was made of tempered glass and a steel frame,  the only thing I didn't like about it was that you have to drink up quickly of the coffee goes cold,  I solved that by getting an insulated carafe to keep the fresh coffee warm,  sadly,  the french press shattered on me one day,  and I chose to replace it with a drip coffee maker.
   I have seen French Presses made for camping,  and in small enough sizes to be interesting,  but it  would still mean heating up the water separately,  then not being able to keep it heated when it's done steeping,  and I doubt that I could make Ramens in a french press in a pinch.   :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6797
  • Minnesota
Re: Coffee
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2012, 01:39:25 PM »
...... " actually Marcia is the one who has a problem with grounds, "......

I fixed that .. .I learned to carve toothpicks.     :rolleyes:


Who said they owned a Mr. Coffee coffee maker?    Does your drip under the carafe when your pouring your coffee?   My new one  is horrible on dripping when filling with water and pouring coffee.   Enough to be quite annoying.  I"d be afraid to pour coffee for someone in fear of getting coffee on them. 

WW
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2012, 02:30:08 PM »
...... " actually Marcia is the one who has a problem with grounds, "......

I fixed that .. .I learned to carve toothpicks.     :rolleyes:


Who said they owned a Mr. Coffee coffee maker?    Does your drip under the carafe when your pouring your coffee?   My new one  is horrible on dripping when filling with water and pouring coffee.   Enough to be quite annoying.  I"d be afraid to pour coffee for someone in fear of getting coffee on them. 

WW

  Actually I do,  it's one of the high end ones with the adjustable warming base which is what I wanted,  and a clock, timer, a button for dark and light coffee, and an alam that tells you when the coffee is done,  all of which I didn't want,  don't know how to set.  and don't need.
  But it does make excellent coffee,  and yes,  the Carafe drips when you pour the coffee into a cup,  the problem seems to be that the transition between the top of the carafe and the pour spout isn't deep to contain and direct the coffee to the end of the spout,  i've often thought about taking a Dremel tool to it and scooping out the spout a little,  but I've learned to slow down when I pour and when I remember to do my part it doesn't drip.
  Slowing down first thing in the morning when you want a cup of coffee in a hurry is very hard,  so is remembering to slow down,  so do like I do,  put a paper towel under your cup,  after the first cup you'll slow down your pour for your guests.   :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #27 on: November 13, 2012, 02:38:16 PM »
.....

Who said they owned a Mr. Coffee coffee maker?    Does your drip under the carafe when your pouring your coffee?   My new one  is horrible on dripping when filling with water and pouring coffee.   Enough to be quite annoying.  I"d be afraid to pour coffee for someone in fear of getting coffee on them. 

WW
I have one (it was a gift, not my choice), and I don't have a severe problem with dripping.
Like all the others, they have a spring loaded valve on the bottom of the grounds hopper. It has a rubber seal/stopper. Check to make sure it hasn't been damaged, or defective from the factory. Clean the area where the stopper is supposed to seat, and clean the stopper itself. Fill the hopper with water over the sink and see where it's leaking. It would only let water out when you push up on the stopper spring the way the carafe does when you put it in the coffee maker.

P.S. Moe posted as I was typing. YES, you have to pour slowly, unlike the West Bend I had before. The carafe is rather poorly designed.

P.P.S  The other trick with the first couple of cups is to use your thumb to flip the lid of the carafe up, and get it out of the way when you pour.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6797
  • Minnesota
Re: Coffee
« Reply #28 on: November 13, 2012, 02:52:08 PM »
At least I know its not just my pot dripping.   This one really drops alot of liquid off the bottom end.  I have a dishtowel laying there all the time now.  I just set my mug on that when I pour.   

Wow Moe.. thats a fancy schmanzy coffee maker you have.   This one is my first for a two hour keep hot and a preset for morning coffee.   Oh.and a clock.   To many buttons for me already.    Hubby wont go near it.  lol

OP.. ya..  that dillywacker thing that supposed to keep the water in the basket while sneaking out a cup dont work on mine very well either.   Maybe theres a reason its a MR!!  always one drip to drop....  :P  :P :P   


WW   :-[     
On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #29 on: November 13, 2012, 02:58:26 PM »
...
OP.. ya..  that dillywacker thing that supposed to keep the water in the basket while sneaking out a cup dont work on mine very well either.   Maybe theres a reason its a MR!!  always one drip to drop....  :P :P :P   

WW   :-[   
Humph.... If it was a MRS. Coffee machine, you wouldn't be able to get a cup of coffee until you explained to it why you wanted the coffee, what you were going to do with it, and why you weren't there at the exact moment the coffee was ready.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #30 on: November 13, 2012, 05:21:43 PM »
   My Mr. Coffee does have warts,  I don't know if there is such a thing as the ideal coffee maker,  but this is my second one of the same model,  I had the first one for a few years before it got killed by some sort of elecrical thing that also took out a few TV's and other appliances in the house.
  I bought both at Lowe's for about $70.00 each,  the two most important things to me is that it makes great coffee,  and that it keeps the coffee hot for two hours after brewing.
  Other coffee makers i've had in the past never kept the coffee any more than luke warm,  and the quality of the coffee would be ok one day and taste like crap the next.
  The things I don't like about this one is the elactrical cord is too short,  the spout on the carafe is poorly designed and as has been said,  it does drip coffee down the side of the carafe if you pour too fast,  it doesn't have an exterior water reference glass so that you can see how much water you're putting in the maker,  you're supposed to look into the top at a white stick with cup markings on it,  what dumb bell thought that up ?
  I fill the carafe to the cup marks on the side then pour the water in the maker,  and I don't care for all the other bells a whistles that it comes with,  but it's the world we live in today,  seems like everything new that we buy has to have a whole bunch of apps that have nothing to do with the original intent of the appliance.
 My cell phone has more power and can perform more tasks that the whole complex full of computers that ran the government for years,  the only thing that it can't do is give me a clear sounding conversation.
 My Direct TV has all kinds of channels,  HD,  bowes sound,  super music stations,  even an IP dock,  and with all that technology,  every time it rains or snows it can't catch a signal.
  I'd like to tell all those brainiacks that invent these things to chill,  all I want from my phone is a quality call,  all I want from my TV is to be able to watch my favorite show when it's on.
  And all I want from my coffee maker is good coffee,  if I want to know what time is is I can look at my old self winding watch,  all it does is tell time,  but it still works and it only has one stem function.

  And some nitwit branded all this crap "Progress".
  And don't even get me started on computers. 
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline wolfy

  • Supporting Member
  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 19448
  • "You want a toe? I can get you a toe." -Sobchak
Re: Coffee
« Reply #31 on: November 13, 2012, 05:32:03 PM »
Let me guess, Moe.....your favorite movie is GRUMPY OLD MEN? :rofl: :cheers:
The only chance you got at a education is listenin' to me talk!
Augustus McCrae.....Texas Ranger      Lonesome Dove, TX

Offline WoodsWoman

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 6797
  • Minnesota
Re: Coffee
« Reply #32 on: November 13, 2012, 07:05:32 PM »
LOL OP.. touche'  :)    Umm.. would you like some coffee with all that sugar?     :-*

Moe,  I bought the cheapest Mr. Coffee..  it still had a window to watch the fill.  Thank goodness cuz I can see that better then the white marks on the pot with out my glasses on in the morning.  :)    And its HOT coffee..    :)   

Funny how I was never a coffee drinker until I found bushcraft.... mmmm.. coinsidence?     

I loved the first Grumpy Old Men movie..  I've always wanted to run a bait store like that one.  :)   

WW.

On particularly rough days when I'm sure I can't possibly endure, I like to remind myself that my track record for getting through bad days so far is 100% and that's pretty good.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #33 on: November 14, 2012, 07:39:52 AM »
Let me guess, Moe.....your favorite movie is GRUMPY OLD MEN? :rofl: :cheers:

  When ever you put Mathou and Lemon together you know it's be funny,  but I'didn't care for their Grumpy old men movies,  they were cute at best.
  My favorite movies would be hard to pin down to just one,  a handful would be closer,  Lonesome Dove for sure,  The Cowboys,  Conagher,  Quigley Down Under, The Patriot with Mel Gibson, Last of the Moheagens,  pretty much anything that has Spenser Tracey and Hepburn in it,  and maybe a couple of dozen others that are don't miss movies when they are playing.
  I think I see a pattern developing here.   :)

  But if you're infering that i'm just an old fart who's partial to the KISS ideology,  you're right,  i'm of a mind that well over half of the worlds problems could be solved by getting rid of pretty much most of the gadetry that has come down the pike over the last fifty or so years.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Highlife

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1260
  • Sometimes more is more.
Re: Coffee
« Reply #34 on: November 14, 2012, 09:28:34 AM »
I like Starbucks brewed coffee (regardless of who does/doesn't see me with the cup).  I really don't like McDonald's, Dunkin' Donuts, 7-Eleven or any other gas station or fast food coffee, regardless of what cops, truck drivers, or anyone else likes.  If I thought I had to go back to drinking coffee made from a Bunn commercial drip maker every day (like at my old job), I'd burn off my taste buds...

I'm perfectly fine being just a yuppie who likes drinking dishwater. I'll stick with my Keurig, french press, and Starbucks.

Good luck getting your system perfected to your tastes, wish I could help.
What's that smell?

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #35 on: November 14, 2012, 09:30:23 AM »
In reference to my Mr. Coffee drip machine, there is one feature that drives me nuts just thinking about it.
It is a testimony to stupid ideas by manufactures to combat stupid people.
At the 12 cup level in the water reservoir, there is a HOLE drilled through the back of the coffee pot! Yeah..just a hole. I guess this is for people who can't measure the water in the carafe, and can't watch the water level in that little graduated window on the side. If they over fill the reservoir, the water runs out the back and all over the counter/floor. WTH? ???

....
  But if you're infering that i'm just an old fart who's partial to the KISS ideology,  you're right,  i'm of a mind that well over half of the worlds problems could be solved by getting rid of pretty much most of the gadetry that has come down the pike over the last fifty or so years.
But Moe, I really don't miss my old manual typewriter! I can publish a better newspaper from my desk now than I could buy 50 years ago! My most used feature in my desktop publishing software?  The Spell Checker! Hahaha!
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #36 on: November 14, 2012, 09:38:49 AM »
In reference to my Mr. Coffee drip machine, there is one feature that drives me nuts just thinking about it.
It is a testimony to stupid ideas by manufactures to combat stupid people.
At the 12 cup level in the water reservoir, there is a HOLE drilled through the back of the coffee pot! Yeah..just a hole. I guess this is for people who can't measure the water in the carafe, and can't watch the water level in that little graduated window on the side. If they over fill the reservoir, the water runs out the back and all over the counter/floor. WTH? ???

....
  But if you're infering that i'm just an old fart who's partial to the KISS ideology,  you're right,  i'm of a mind that well over half of the worlds problems could be solved by getting rid of pretty much most of the gadetry that has come down the pike over the last fifty or so years.
But Moe, I really don't miss my old manual typewriter! I can publish a better newspaper from my desk now than I could buy 50 years ago! My most used feature in my desktop publishing software?  The Spell Checker! Hahaha!

   Well,  I did say most,  not all.

   I do agree on the spell check feature,  when I can remember to use it,  I do pretty well at getting my thoughts and message across,  but my spelling does make me appear pretty damned dumb sometimes.   :)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #37 on: November 14, 2012, 09:54:05 AM »
....
   I do agree on the spell check feature,  when I can remember to use it,  I do pretty well at getting my thoughts and message across,  but my spelling does make me appear pretty damned dumb sometimes.   :)
I couldn't spell my name, if it wasn't a conditioned reflex.  :P I have ieSpell software installed, which unfortunately doesn't work with this forum software, but dictionary.com has a prominent place on the Favorites bar of my browser.  :-\ Some of my comments are dumb enough, without adding misspelled words to the mix.  ;D
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Anubis1335

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 484
Re: Coffee
« Reply #38 on: November 24, 2012, 09:21:32 AM »
I have one of these
http://www.bialetti.com/coffee/moka/


And the kuerig.  The kuerig is ok.  The bialetti makes a good cuppa.  Idk but maybe you could use this by a fire. 
OINK!

Offline wgiles

  • Mill File+
  • *
  • Posts: 79
Re: Coffee
« Reply #39 on: November 26, 2012, 06:47:11 PM »
For many years, when truck camping or hunting, I have used a Nissan/Thermos coffee press to brew coffee. I normally use an old aluminum percolator to heat the water in. I used this setup a week ago deer hunting, but used a 20 cup percolator on a Camp Chef Pro 60 grill. I could heat half a gallon of water to a boil in a few minutes and had plenty of fresh coffee in camp before the morning hunt. There were three or four of us in camp each morning, so a quick boil was absolutely necessary. I could have used the percolator to make coffee, but it gets old too quickly.

This weekend, I will be deer hunting again, but not camping at the site. I still want fresh hot coffee, but don't want to pack in a Camp Chef stove. I have tons of camp stoves and burners, but decided to take a Jetboil flash with coffee press attachment. It will boil a pint of water in 3 minutes and is pretty well self contained. Cleaning the pot should be a matter of wiping it with a paper towel.  I normally just brew the coffee and then pour it into a thermos that goes in my hunting pack, so keeping the coffee warm shouldn't be an issue. I don't drink coffee in the afternoon, but really like to have a hot drink with me, so I have started using hot spiced apple cider mix in the thermos. The Jetboil should give me plenty of hot water for this, too. While we won't be camping, we may build a fire and tell stories for a while after we come in from the hunt, so I may have to take the old coffee pot as well.

Offline wgiles

  • Mill File+
  • *
  • Posts: 79
Re: Coffee
« Reply #40 on: December 03, 2012, 08:48:46 AM »
I used the Jetboil once. We built a fire each day and I just set my old coffee pot on the fire and boiled water. I did use the Jetboil companion cup and coffee press to make coffee each day, just didn't heat the water with it. The coffee press is a bit loose in the companion cup, so you get a bit of fine grounds in your cup. It wasn't too hard to clean up. I also used some Folger's Fresh Breaks Black Silk coffee pouches, which are a mixture of very finely ground coffee and instant coffee. These work, but are too strong and bitter for my taste. The single serving pouches may be the way to go when traveling alone, but will take some getting used to and may need to be stretched out to a larger volume brew.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #41 on: December 03, 2012, 08:56:10 AM »
My wife's 2 cup Mr. Coffee went TU a couple weeks ago. She drinks de-caf, and brews her own. Now she's making noises about a French press.
Do they make them with a metal base that can be kept warm on a stove top? Anyone have a brand, and/or source they'd recommend?
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Coffee
« Reply #42 on: December 03, 2012, 09:09:21 AM »
My wife's 2 cup Mr. Coffee went TU a couple weeks ago. She drinks de-caf, and brews her own. Now she's making noises about a French press.
Do they make them with a metal base that can be kept warm on a stove top? Anyone have a brand, and/or source they'd recommend?

  I've had a couple made by one of the best French makers, and they do make great coffee,  especially if you read the directions that come with them (which we all know is not a popular thing to do by most males) that calls for using a Fine Grind coffee.
  My only problem with french presses is that i've never seen one that can be kept on a stove top or that was avaliable with a warming tray.
  I brew at least four cups of coffee (eight european cups) every morning and have to keep it warm for at least two hours or have to deal with micro-waving the cooled coffee,  something I don't care much for.

  Good luck in your search OP.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #43 on: December 03, 2012, 09:25:36 AM »

  I've had a couple made by one of the best French makers, and they do make great coffee,  especially if you read the directions that come with them (which we all know is not a popular thing to do by most males) that calls for using a Fine Grind coffee.
  My only problem with french presses is that i've never seen one that can be kept on a stove top or that was avaliable with a warming tray.
  I brew at least four cups of coffee (eight european cups) every morning and have to keep it warm for at least two hours or have to deal with micro-waving the cooled coffee,  something I don't care much for.

  Good luck in your search OP.
I did find one with a stainless container, but it was tipping the scale at $99. Hardly worth it when you have to use a special grind, and you can buy a drip coffee maker for $15!
One trick we learned with our espresso machine: Take your regular grind drip coffee and run it through a spice grinder to get a powder.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline acara

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1269
  • Captain of the Blue Pig
Re: Coffee
« Reply #44 on: December 03, 2012, 09:33:29 AM »
Have you considered any of the Bruntons? They aren't as cool & trendy as tome of the other "press/cup" combos, but they've been around a couple years and work pretty well camping.

The "flip & drip" is the one I've used in the field before ..... and it makes a passable cup of coffee

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002QLY8HC/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_1?pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B004R1IURI&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=016MDVYHD37RC4CEWZCK

I could point you at some better ones .... but they run something stupid, like 120.00 - 180.00
Meet me under the pee-pee-tree

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Coffee
« Reply #45 on: December 03, 2012, 09:40:49 AM »
I could see that for pack-in camping, for sure. Portability isn't so much of an issue in our case. I think the reason she's looking at a French press is that when she wants her coffee, she wants it yesterday!
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline TACSAR

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 236
  • Staying sharp
    • Thornton Images
Coffee
« Reply #46 on: December 03, 2012, 10:27:21 AM »

  I've had a couple made by one of the best French makers, and they do make great coffee,  especially if you read the directions that come with them (which we all know is not a popular thing to do by most males) that calls for using a Fine Grind coffee.
  My only problem with french presses is that i've never seen one that can be kept on a stove top or that was avaliable with a warming tray.
  I brew at least four cups of coffee (eight european cups) every morning and have to keep it warm for at least two hours or have to deal with micro-waving the cooled coffee,  something I don't care much for.

  Good luck in your search OP.
I did find one with a stainless container, but it was tipping the scale at $99. Hardly worth it when you have to use a special grind, and you can buy a drip coffee maker for $15!
One trick we learned with our espresso machine: Take your regular grind drip coffee and run it through a spice grinder to get a powder.

I've used a press for a very long time and it does make a great cup of brew. You don't need a really fine grind though, as I've used all levels of grind in mine and if you use a very fine one, it creates a bit of a seal and is super hard to press. Haven't seen one that's steel for warming but I'll say this, I'd buy it at $99 because THAT is how important my coffee is. Hahaha. ;)


Sent from my iPhone whilst punch dancing in the woods.

Offline PetrifiedWood

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Administrator
  • Belt Grinder
  • ******
  • Posts: 11468
Re: Coffee
« Reply #47 on: December 03, 2012, 11:41:24 AM »
I think I am beginning to understand coffee more now than ever before.  I have been drinking instant coffee for a little over a month now. I love it! And this is from a guy who used to be very particular and have to have a special coffee and chicory blend, etc. The trouble is I was only drinking it a couple of times a year because the clean up hardly seemed worth it.

Now with the instant, I drink it at least every other day, and it is becoming more frequent. Now I have been lucky enough to have coffee from some pretty fancy coffee shops, and some fancy beans as well. I even dated a chick that worked at a coffee shop. But in spite of the very best beans and preparation, to my palate, once I add cream and sugar, the difference is almost indistinguishable from instant.

So what I have come to believe is that most coffee connoisseurs are drinking it black, and that the ritual of making the coffee is as important as the drink itself.  Kinda like shaving with a double edge razor. The process is as important as the end result. You can get an excellent, close shave with a disposable razor but it isnt as satisfying as a traditional shave with lather and a shiny chrome razor.

Likewise, I think some degree of the satisfaction coffee drinkers get from their cup of coffee is in the preparation of it.

For me, I like the drink far more than the ritual. 

This is all just opinion based on observation, and my admittedly unrefined coffee palate.

Offline kanukkarhu

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 5898
  • Canadian Woods Loafer & Certified Nobody
Re: Coffee
« Reply #48 on: December 03, 2012, 12:07:20 PM »
I think I am beginning to understand coffee more now than ever before.  I have been drinking instant coffee for a little over a month now. I love it! And this is from a guy who used to be very particular and have to have a special coffee and chicory blend, etc. The trouble is I was only drinking it a couple of times a year because the clean up hardly seemed worth it.

Now with the instant, I drink it at least every other day, and it is becoming more frequent. Now I have been lucky enough to have coffee from some pretty fancy coffee shops, and some fancy beans as well. I even dated a chick that worked at a coffee shop. But in spite of the very best beans and preparation, to my palate, once I add cream and sugar, the difference is almost indistinguishable from instant.

So what I have come to believe is that most coffee connoisseurs are drinking it black, and that the ritual of making the coffee is as important as the drink itself.  Kinda like shaving with a double edge razor. The process is as important as the end result. You can get an excellent, close shave with a disposable razor but it isnt as satisfying as a traditional shave with lather and a shiny chrome razor.

Likewise, I think some degree of the satisfaction coffee drinkers get from their cup of coffee is in the preparation of it.

For me, I like the drink far more than the ritual. 

This is all just opinion based on observation, and my admittedly unrefined coffee palate.
Hahahaha!  What I have some to believe is that you're becoming addicted! :lol:  Just kidding! ;)

I actually agree with lots of what you've said - much of it jives with what I've noticed too.  When I drink coffee, I keep my coffee down to about 3 max in the am, before my gut starts in on me.

But can I add that marrying into a Finnish family has taught me a few things about coffee (they're kinda fanatical about their coffee, these Finns...)?  I do believe you're right about the 'purists' (including my oldest son) drinking it black.  Although I might hasten to wonder if it might be because some are fueling an addiction/dependency?  And before I'm judged a prude and shouted down, I base this on years of work with addictions and people with addictive tendencies.  I've seen so many of my wife's relatives suffer from caffeine withdrawal not to make some of these connections.  While cream and sugar likely don't (as I understand it, anyway) inhibit caffeine uptake, almost all of the relatives I would consider to be dependent (ie, "need" a coffee to function in the am, or have headaches without it) like it "black and bitter."

Coincidence?

Just a thot FWIW.

KK

 
What if you woke up today, with only the things you thanked God for yesterday?

Offline PetrifiedWood

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Administrator
  • Belt Grinder
  • ******
  • Posts: 11468
Re: Coffee
« Reply #49 on: December 03, 2012, 12:13:49 PM »
I'll bet there are studies somewhere...

Not sure how cream and sugar affect it either way. I've had coffee black a few times but I never got into it. I like coffee flavored ice cream. And I like my coffee to taste like warm coffee flavored ice cream. :D