Author Topic: Greens  (Read 4285 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Greens
« on: May 07, 2014, 06:04:24 AM »

  Anyone have some good recipes for Kale,  Chard,  Collard and Mustard Greens,  etc.,  I'm thinking more along the lines of side dishes or as part of an entree,  I've used greens in soups and stews before and I cook cabbage and spinach as stand alone dishes,  but I'm looking to expand my veggie options.
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline madmax

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 10027
  • The Phoenix
Re: Greens
« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2014, 06:44:54 AM »
Pretty much onions, bacon fat, and bacon.  Boil until tender.  A southern staple.  We can eat greens as a meat.  The biggest problem with them is getting the sand off from the garden.  lol
At least it's not a femur through the pelvis.

Offline Bearhunter

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 4642
Re: Greens
« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2014, 08:29:29 AM »
Greens are my favorite :drool:
I've grown and have cooked and canned pounds!
My favorite way to prepare fresh greens is with garlic, a little onion, hot pepper sauce and most important... a nice big ham hock!!!
Add salt to taste.
I like mine very spicy, but then again I like everything spicy ;)

Sent from my SCH-S738C using Tapatalk

Don't wait until it's too late to live your dream!

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Greens
« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2014, 09:26:46 AM »

  Anyone have some good recipes for Kale,  Chard,  Collard and Mustard Greens,  etc.,  I'm thinking more along the lines of side dishes or as part of an entree,  I've used greens in soups and stews before and I cook cabbage and spinach as stand alone dishes,  but I'm looking to expand my veggie options.

We've done this with kale, chard, and mustard greens:

Cut the leaves into 2"-3" pieces.
Toss in a bowl with just enough olive oil to coat, and sprinkle in some seasoned salt, granulated garlic (or powder), a smidgen of pepper. Eventually you'll come up with your own seasonings.
Lay the leaves flat on an ungreased cookie sheet, and put in a 350 deg oven.
Bake until they are just starting to brown, look dry, or well shriveled (you'll know).
Let cool, and they should pop right off the cookie sheet. If you have trouble with them sticking, use parchment paper.

Interesting and healthy substitute for potato/corn chips.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline diogenes

  • Charred Cloth Challenge
  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 1667
  • Winding down.
Re: Greens
« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2014, 10:43:34 AM »
Something a little different, but I like Vietnamese-style water spinach a lot. Don't have a specific recipe, but this vid looks about right:



The one thing I'd add is some chilis to it. I like some heat in there. >:D

I'm sure you could do this with other greens as well.
"Go away," Chuang Tzu said. "I'm dragging my tail in the mud."

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Greens
« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2014, 11:31:47 AM »
Moe,
Ironically, my wife was just reading me a bit form a new book we got on food storage. There is a simple method of preserving chard stems (and presumably collard stems) in Mason jars, or any glass bottle. Supposedly a 2 year shelf life.  I can provide details, if you're interested.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline SIXFOOTER

  • Whetstone +
  • **
  • Posts: 963
  • Wandering Smartass
Re: Greens
« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2014, 11:34:04 AM »
I like to use a combination of greens, equal parts Mustard, Collard and Turnip with a dash of Vinager, a little garlic and bacon. Boil tip tender and your good to go.
Maker of all things Archaic, Hoarder of Gear and Fluent speaker of BS
Sixfooter got bit by a snake like that once, then after 4 agonizing days... The snake finally died....

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Greens
« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2014, 02:01:50 PM »
Moe,
Ironically, my wife was just reading me a bit form a new book we got on food storage. There is a simple method of preserving chard stems (and presumably collard stems) in Mason jars, or any glass bottle. Supposedly a 2 year shelf life.  I can provide details, if you're interested.

   Always interested.        :thumbsup:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Mannlicher

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2723
  • A Florida Cracker, and an original Kracaneuner
Re: Greens
« Reply #8 on: May 07, 2014, 03:11:15 PM »
with Kale and Chard, I like to pan fry them.  Put them in a large skillet with a bit of water, and braise them.  When the water dries out, I add a little olive oil, and cook them until well wilted.

With Collards, I have to have a ham hock and some onions.  :)

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Greens
« Reply #9 on: May 07, 2014, 08:35:00 PM »
with Kale and Chard, I like to pan fry them.  Put them in a large skillet with a bit of water, and braise them.  When the water dries out, I add a little olive oil, and cook them until well wilted.

With Collards, I have to have a ham hock and some onions.  :)

  Basically that's the way I cooked it,   I sweated some onions and garlic in olive oil and butter, then turned up the heat and added a 1/2 cup of chicken stock,  then put in the Kale and mixed it up to coat the greens,  then I covered it and let it steam for about five minutes,  then I uncovered it and cook it until the stock evaporated (another few minutes).
  The kale was well wilted and it tasted great,  but it was like chewing rope,  I guess I didn't cook it long enough,  man that is some tough plant material,  I have another large bunch in the fridge,  I don't know what I'm going to do with it,   Max said to Boil the crap out of it,  maybe I'll try that.   
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline PetrifiedWood

  • Friction Fire Fellowship
  • Administrator
  • Belt Grinder
  • ******
  • Posts: 11468
Re: Greens
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2014, 08:55:00 PM »
One of my friend's mom back in Louisiana used to make collards with smoked sausage in them. I wish I had paid more attention to the recipe because they were amazing.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Greens
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2014, 08:56:27 PM »
...  I have another large bunch in the fridge,  I don't know what I'm going to do with it,   Max said to Boil the crap out of it,  maybe I'll try that.   
The neighbor was just over today, and she and the wife were raving about Veggie Crisps...again.
I'd encourage you to try it with a few leaves at least.
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!

Offline Bearhunter

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 4642
Re: Greens
« Reply #12 on: May 07, 2014, 10:05:20 PM »
Another way the ex and I use to cook them...
Braised in homemade chicken stock with olive oil, hobanero and Thai chilies, whole sezuana peppercorns and fresh garlic... spicy ... :drool:
It'll set your tougn on fire ;)

Delicious :fire:

Sent from my SCH-S738C using Tapatalk
« Last Edit: May 07, 2014, 10:19:06 PM by Bearhunter »
Don't wait until it's too late to live your dream!

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Greens
« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2014, 06:43:19 AM »
...  I have another large bunch in the fridge,  I don't know what I'm going to do with it,   Max said to Boil the crap out of it,  maybe I'll try that.   
The neighbor was just over today, and she and the wife were raving about Veggie Crisps...again.
I'd encourage you to try it with a few leaves at least.

  I'll give it a try,  I've made broccoli in the oven that way and it was good,   It was a while ago but I think I cut the pieces lengthways,  then drizzled a little olive oil on them, some salt and pepper and some grated Parmesan,  I think I used the broiler to crisp them up.

  I'm surprised at how tough it was,  I don't get many fails in the kitchen,  and the way most talk about how good it is it had to be something I didn't do right,  either I didn't cook it long enough or it wasn't young Kale,  maybe it was just my expectations.
  I've used it in soups before and it wasn't that chewy,  I expected it to have about the same consistency of cooked Spinach on the tender meter,  but,  I do have another 1-1/2 pound bunch to experiment with.    ;)
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Mannlicher

  • Water Stone
  • ***
  • Posts: 2723
  • A Florida Cracker, and an original Kracaneuner
Re: Greens
« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2014, 06:53:21 AM »

Kale, being cooked in a skillet

Offline Moe M.

  • Diamond Stone
  • ****
  • Posts: 8960
Re: Greens
« Reply #15 on: May 08, 2014, 07:19:30 AM »

Kale, being cooked in a skillet

  Yup,  mine looked like that but without the stems,  the little bit I read about preparing it said to discard the stem material,  so I took it literally,  there seems to be a difference of opinion on how Kale should be cooked,  I tried the braising and frying method and it was literally like chewing balled up green grass,  other recipes suggestions were to steam it or boil it for a long time (like 15 minutes or so),  I thought doing it that way would give you green slime in the end,  now I'm rethinking that part of it,   maybe it's time for a bigger hammer.    :shrug:
In youth we learn,   with age we understand.

Offline Old Philosopher

  • Belt Grinder
  • *****
  • Posts: 16466
  • "I have an opinion about that...."
Re: Greens
« Reply #16 on: May 08, 2014, 09:52:04 AM »
We de-stem (is that a word?) our kale, too. Kale is bullet proof, even in the kitchen. It was the American leaf veggie of choice before the days of refrigerated transportation.
The only thing we use the older leaves for is dishes requiring a long cooking time. I find even some of the younger leaves are distinctly tough in a salad. The first time I got an old leaf in a salad, I thought I was chewing on a piece of plastic. :P
Don't bother walking a mile in my shoes. That would be boring. Try spending 30 seconds in my head. That will freak you right out!!