Author Topic: newbies of bushcrafting  (Read 1276 times)

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Offline hayshaker

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newbies of bushcrafting
« on: January 24, 2021, 11:33:10 AM »
as of late i've been watching  quite a number of youtube prepper sites and have listend to the hosts.
as they talk about bush crafting and how they need to learn more, lol .
i need i quess to contact them and show them our family where they can learn busshcrafting.

truly it is a survival skill.  just look at the movie jerimiah jones with ronert redford, when soaking wet in a snow storm tried to make a fire.
oh my. so if anyone where does youtube  please point them here. afterall that's why where here, what say you?

Offline wsdstan

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2021, 08:27:30 AM »
I say it is okay with this caveat.  We want some new blood here (maybe) and so things posted here should keep them here.  It will take some posts on different skills and gear and can't be a one and done effort. 

Mtwoodsrunner has some great Youtube videos.  There are lots of other bushcrafters including some very good European sites and some talented women.

Here is a a good one from Dave about his five favorite woodscraft items.

 

How about laying out your fire starting stuff for instance and taking a photo of it.  Explain each item and how it is used.  Bic lighters to flints and tinder or a stick and tinder. 
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Offline boomer

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2021, 08:13:27 AM »
"We want some new blood here (maybe) and so things posted here should keep them here"


An interesting concept. Perhaps not one geared toward promoting participation but interesting none the less.

How is "bushrafting" defined anyway? Is it an idea, an approach to the outdoors as in the Victorian concept of Woods Lounging or simply a   marketing term? Is bushcrafting the province of the many or the few and who decides membership in the club? Exclusive or inclusive?  Is someone who gathers expensive gear, takes a short walk out in the woods with a bunch of food, sits on a log and cooks it up on a titanium super stove bushcrafting? Who gets to decide that? What critiques are valid or even warranted?

Is a certain political attitude required to enjoy the outdoors? Does an appreciation of nature presuppose political party adherence or acceptance of specific religious dogma? Those are self imposed restrictions which can be respected but is the imposition on others a sine qua non pf participation? Do we shun those holding a different perspective? That which does not bend breaks and few things are harder to open than a closed mind. Just saying.

Looking for politics in Nature seems more a fools errand than anything else. In my experience Nature is "Of itself so" and we exist IN Nature regardless of how humans like to pretend otherwise. Pretending otherwise isn't really our nature, of course. But it is a concpet long usefll by some. If we hold the view of existing IN Nature is reality, that which we share is greater than our differences and neither misguided environmentalism nor free market nonsense, convetional political theory or conspiracy idiocy matters for much in the final analysis.

So, does this site actually want to increase participation (maybe) or not? I don't know.

Offline crashdive123

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2021, 04:24:15 AM »
"We want some new blood here (maybe) and so things posted here should keep them here"


An interesting concept. Perhaps not one geared toward promoting participation but interesting none the less.

How is "bushrafting" defined anyway? Is it an idea, an approach to the outdoors as in the Victorian concept of Woods Lounging or simply a   marketing term? Is bushcrafting the province of the many or the few and who decides membership in the club? Exclusive or inclusive?  Is someone who gathers expensive gear, takes a short walk out in the woods with a bunch of food, sits on a log and cooks it up on a titanium super stove bushcrafting? Who gets to decide that? What critiques are valid or even warranted?

Is a certain political attitude required to enjoy the outdoors? Does an appreciation of nature presuppose political party adherence or acceptance of specific religious dogma? Those are self imposed restrictions which can be respected but is the imposition on others a sine qua non pf participation? Do we shun those holding a different perspective? That which does not bend breaks and few things are harder to open than a closed mind. Just saying.

Looking for politics in Nature seems more a fools errand than anything else. In my experience Nature is "Of itself so" and we exist IN Nature regardless of how humans like to pretend otherwise. Pretending otherwise isn't really our nature, of course. But it is a concpet long usefll by some. If we hold the view of existing IN Nature is reality, that which we share is greater than our differences and neither misguided environmentalism nor free market nonsense, convetional political theory or conspiracy idiocy matters for much in the final analysis.

So, does this site actually want to increase participation (maybe) or not? I don't know.

So, in a thread that has nothing to do with anything other than to maybe help introduce bushcrafting to others (regardless of how you define it), you felt it necessary to ............. well, say what you said?  Maybe you should look in the mirror to see where your perceived problems are coming from.

Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2021, 05:23:34 AM »
Lol.

Offline boomer

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #5 on: January 28, 2021, 11:38:48 AM »
It's likely folks coming to this site, like any other, will read through existing posts to get a sense of the environment.  Those doing so will find plenty of material, recent and historical, that is not exactly open minded or welcoming.  Posts are often laden with asides, labels and qualifiers that indicate a certain view. Some posts tend to be outright offensive to any hint of disagreement. As long as a few require virtual obeisance and promotion of their particular zeitgeist for acceptance then the potential for attracting "newbies" is necessarily restricted.

It may be that the bush crafting trend is waning in general. There are still and always will be folks who prefer outdoor pursuits, historical reenactments, the "old ways", the tools of the craft etc. Personally, I consider learning these things essential for a number of reasons. Not the least of which is an entry point to larger environmental issues. Sure there are other areas of satisfaction and creating a healthy experience for folks of all ages. Given our current environmental problems in so many areas however, the more folks of all persuasions introduced and encouraged in aspects of the outdoors the better.

The OP questioned how newbies could be encouraged to participate here. The current environment is not the best means of accomplishing that goal.

Offline wolfy

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #6 on: January 28, 2021, 12:38:01 PM »
GUILTY! :rolleyes: but I still think, and will argue unto death, that Velveeta is essential in reproducing Mom's Baked Mac & Cheese and will accept no substitute......con trary to what Moe or any other 'expert' says!  :shrug:
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Offline xj35s

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2021, 04:28:13 AM »
Boomer, you way over think everything. It is in fact annoying.
Crafting is that. Could be airplane and boat modeling, knitting, painting, or anything else one does for enjoyment. That fact is it's a hobby because nobody is going walkabout for 20 years leaving society entirely.
For me it is just fun to be in the woods. The only bushcrafting I do is build a small fire. I did it almost daily when Julia was still with us. It was my timer. When the small fire went out I called the dog to go home. No wood bigger than my wrist and usually only a couple of them. The only item I take is my SAK with firesteel.
,
pessimist complain about the wind. optimist expect the wind to change. realist adjusts the sails.

Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2021, 10:36:49 AM »
I've offered for many years, ya wanna practice bushcraft/wilderness survival skills?  Pot and machete in Florida.  A pot, a machete, and the clothes on your back.  3 days for the first one.  I promise you will learn the first lesson in survival... we'll go from there.  Real deal.  I have past  participants to collaborate.  Some even come back for seconds. LOL.

Free.  No strings.

Bring it.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2021, 10:48:35 AM by madmaxine »

Offline randyt

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #9 on: January 30, 2021, 10:58:05 AM »
after that go to a place a tad bit cooler, no flip flops required.






Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #10 on: January 30, 2021, 11:06:20 AM »
LOL.  Yeah randyt.  I spent a lot of time in northern MN.  Can't remember wearing flip flops.  Way different world.  I'd need some serious remediation to survive there.

Cool pics.  Down here at rendezvous the tent stove pipes were smoking at 40 degrees.  I slept with a wool blanket by the fire.  I might be too old to do a Pot and Axe up by you.

Offline randyt

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #11 on: January 30, 2021, 11:29:32 AM »
no skeeters, chiggers and ticks oh my, lol... Cody lundin will take on winter no shoes but not this kid..

Offline duxdawg

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #12 on: January 30, 2021, 03:40:36 PM »
Chuckleheads like Boomer, MnSportsman, and their ilk are the **only** reason I rarely visit this site and even more rarely comment.

Want more participation from more people?
As the US Army taught us: "Police your ranks."

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #13 on: January 30, 2021, 06:27:53 PM »
Boomer, you way over think everything. It is in fact annoying.
Crafting is that. Could be airplane and boat modeling, knitting, painting, or anything else one does for enjoyment. That fact is it's a hobby because nobody is going walkabout for 20 years leaving society entirely.
For me it is just fun to be in the woods. The only bushcrafting I do is build a small fire. I did it almost daily when Julia was still with us. It was my timer. When the small fire went out I called the dog to go home. No wood bigger than my wrist and usually only a couple of them. The only item I take is my SAK with firesteel.
,

Is the .stl for that knife scale on Thingiverse?   I recently got a 3D printer and have been looking for fun stuff to make.

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #14 on: January 30, 2021, 06:49:49 PM »
"We want some new blood here (maybe) and so things posted here should keep them here"


An interesting concept. Perhaps not one geared toward promoting participation but interesting none the less.

How is "bushrafting" defined anyway? Is it an idea, an approach to the outdoors as in the Victorian concept of Woods Lounging or simply a   marketing term? Is bushcrafting the province of the many or the few and who decides membership in the club? Exclusive or inclusive?  Is someone who gathers expensive gear, takes a short walk out in the woods with a bunch of food, sits on a log and cooks it up on a titanium super stove bushcrafting? Who gets to decide that? What critiques are valid or even warranted?

Is a certain political attitude required to enjoy the outdoors? Does an appreciation of nature presuppose political party adherence or acceptance of specific religious dogma? Those are self imposed restrictions which can be respected but is the imposition on others a sine qua non pf participation? Do we shun those holding a different perspective? That which does not bend breaks and few things are harder to open than a closed mind. Just saying.

Looking for politics in Nature seems more a fools errand than anything else. In my experience Nature is "Of itself so" and we exist IN Nature regardless of how humans like to pretend otherwise. Pretending otherwise isn't really our nature, of course. But it is a concpet long usefll by some. If we hold the view of existing IN Nature is reality, that which we share is greater than our differences and neither misguided environmentalism nor free market nonsense, convetional political theory or conspiracy idiocy matters for much in the final analysis.

So, does this site actually want to increase participation (maybe) or not? I don't know.

This post is pretty vague.  What, exactly is the issue?  When this forum was originally founded, there were two admins, and we agreed that we weren't going to actively promote any particular political ideology here. 

That said, I think many of the long-time members here manage to get along pretty well, because problems don't crop up very often.   I scrolled to the top of the thread to see where anyone has posted anything about politics, and it looks like your post was the first one mentioning politics.  So it looks like you created a political discussion in the thread where none existed prior.   

As for attracting new members, that has advantages and disadvantages. 

The great thing about the internet is there are limitless "ports in the storm" where a person can go to discuss even the most niche of hobbies, and find a group that suits their personality and ideology just fine.  I don't understand the need people feel to change things when they could just as easily go somewhere else that is already better suited for their preferences.

I remember many decades ago in elementary school, there were different "groups" of kids, and some of them were welcoming to others, others of them, not so much.  The world didn't end, and everyone found their group.  Sort of like the sorting hat in Harry Potter.   I bet there is a social media group somewhere that has exactly what you're looking for, if you feel you can't find it here.

So, are you saying that we should require that everyone agree?  Or that we should suppress our opinions to make others feel welcome?  What should we do to fix this "problem"?

Offline wolfy

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2021, 07:14:45 PM »
Dux, I really didn't know what a 'chucklehead,' was, for sure....so, like every other moron in the universe that has access to the internet, I Googled it!   :shrug:

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chucklehead


Since I am of German/Dane/Scotch/Norwegian decent, I could be officially classified as a DUMMKOPF! :P.  Does that make me a racist, too? :shrug: :rofl: :cheers:
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Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2021, 03:49:37 AM »
LOL wolfy.  Mom signed me up for German club early on.  For no reason in particular.  Maybe to keep me out out of trouble.  Fail.
But the second we kleine kinder found out about the insult, "dummkopf", we used it on each other constantly.
Oddly,  we soon looked for better insults which improved our German. 
Thanks Mom.

Now back to your regular programing.

Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2021, 03:54:49 AM »
PW.  Those of us who remember the early days of B&B and why we came here appreciate you and the spirit of this site.

Thanks.

Offline duxdawg

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2021, 07:05:46 AM »
That synonym & antonym list made for an amusing read Wolfy.

+1 to MadMaxine's most recent post.
I'm not an oldtimer on this particular forum, (though I've been on various BB's and forums since the mid '80s.), yet I appreciate what's here.

Offline wsdstan

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2021, 12:14:34 PM »
I am glad to see that list of synonym and antonyms in that definition of Chucklehead.  I had a great childhood from a language standpoint.  There were only about six I never used or was called.  It refreshed my arsenal of great names to piss people off.

Life is good.  :)
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Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2021, 01:32:48 PM »
They missed fartface.  The incomprehensible name my lovely wife and I call each other... mostly.

Try it.  It rolls off the tongue like a good cuss word should.

Offline PetrifiedWood

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #21 on: January 31, 2021, 06:13:14 PM »
PW.  Those of us who remember the early days of B&B and why we came here appreciate you and the spirit of this site.

Thanks.

We are creeping closer to a decade since we got started.  Nice to see there is a core group of regulars that still make use of the site.  If I ever get enough passive income to cover my bills, I'll be able to devote a lot more time here.  But I did axe my facebook account, so that will help a little.  ;D

Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #22 on: February 01, 2021, 04:12:21 AM »
I can do better contributing content.  Gotta figure out the photo thing.  I'll check in with Crash.  He has that down very well.

Considering how many nights a year we spend outside and cooking in cast iron, there's no excuse for not posting more.

I'm kinda mentoring a young man in the outdoorsman tradition.  A year ago he was a bright eyed newb that could barely build a fire in dry conditions.  He is now totally immersed in the lifestyle.  From cast iron cooking to hunting.  It would be nice if this site could help those interested.  I'll try to do my part.

Tony


Offline wolfy

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #23 on: February 01, 2021, 01:00:06 PM »
Is that the 'young man' that I met at Hush's farm last March?  If I recall, he was pretty intent on learning how to knit at the time.  Something I never bothered to learn and wish I had....that, and learning how to play the piano.  Everything else, I'm really good at! :lol:
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Offline madmaxine

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Re: newbies of bushcrafting
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2021, 02:05:13 PM »
Yes it is wolfy.  He's currently in saddle making school.  i'm proud I could uplift and direct him in the right direction.  It could have gone sideways very easily. 

He has taken up shooting sports and wants to hunt next year.  He has a carry license and the pistol that I am envious of.

A natural at the keyboards.  He improvised at my piano hours a day.

Uncle Tony ain't such a slouch after all.  lol

ps.  After showing him the ropes in archery he shot a Robin Hood (Split an arrow) the first month.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2021, 03:14:48 PM by madmaxine »