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1
General Discussion / Re: BRRRRR!
« Last post by wolfy on Today at 07:26:34 PM »
The 20 pounders from a grill will work, as will the larger 100 pounders and up. As long as you don't draw to much from them at any one time. A little buddy heater is OK hooked to a BBQ tank, a 150,000 BTU furnace is not.

But those little one pound canisters are pretty helpless when the temperatures drop. If you bring the canisters indoors to warm up before taking them out to use in the little Mr. heater, you'll be OK. But if your storing the one pound canisters outside in the 20 below zero weather, they'll fire up for a few seconds, and then as the pressure is bled off, the heater will quit. You can get the pilot light lit, but as the catalytic burner comes on, it glows for a few seconds and then winks out.

The people that heat their houses with propane will usually have a 500 gallon or larger propane tank to ensure adequate pressure and volume to the household furnace during those cold spells.

Cold temperatures are hard on everything. Number 2 diesel at 35 below zero attains the consistency of bacon grease at room temperature. About the same color too. Kind of a cloudy milky white.  At 40 below zero, you can stand on an oil drain pan with 80/90 weight hypoid oil in it and just leave boot prints. You won't sink to the bottom.

I heat my house with electric and have a fuel oil backup furnace. I have a 275 gallon tank of fuel in the basement, because if it was outside, the fuel would never flow through the feed pipe in cold weather. Keeping it in the basement allows me to burn number 2 diesel. If the tank were outside in the cold I would have to use number one diesel fuel in order to get it to flow. Number one costs more.

I use number one diesel in the tractor for snow removal but I only go through 25 gallons or so through the winter months. When the number two diesel gets cold, the waxes precipitate out and plugs up the fuel filters. And there you sit until you swap out the filters and dump a bunch of additive into the tank to dissolve the waxes. An all around pain in the butt at 15 or 20 below and the wind blowing. Spend the few extra dollars and burn number one.

Many, many years ago. Before the advent of modern ignition systems. If conditions were just right. A super cold night and then a warm front would move in in the morning. The engines (gasoline in cars, trucks, airplanes and tractors) would draw that warmer air in on the first crank of the starter and the moisture in the air would condense on the spark plug electrode because it was colder from the night before.

Now a warm front moving in just means that the temperature has gone from a neg 40 to a neg 10. Enough of a change to cause condensation on the spark plugs, but not warm enough to make pulling and drying out spark plugs on an engine a fun time in the morning.  Luckily it was a rare occurrence that didn't happen every year.  Since then, better ignition systems, block heaters and heated garages have made this almost a thing of the past.

This is all old news for the folks in Canada and Alaska. On the other hand, we don't run into hot weather vapor lock very often either. But, better engineering and fuel formulations have pretty much eliminated that too.

Spoken by a man with experience in these matters. 

WOLFY APPROVED! :hail:
2
General Discussion / Re: Oh Lord
« Last post by Mad-max on Today at 05:12:19 PM »
Yup.  Thanks.  The dog pack rocks the world.  We just hold on for the ride.  Lol
3
General Discussion / Re: Oh Lord
« Last post by wsdstan on Today at 04:26:30 PM »
Well that is good news.  Go get em' Max. 
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General Discussion / Re: Oh Lord
« Last post by Mad-max on Today at 02:00:49 PM »
It would be like telling Kelly she has to sleep outside.  Max is just a part of the family.  So I guess I'll just keep the bleach bottle and paper towels handy.

Update.  He's all better now.  Even asking for his ball when we go out. Albeit rolling it slowly.  He can't run anymore...
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General Discussion / Re: BRRRRR!
« Last post by Pete Bog on Today at 05:37:11 AM »
The 20 pounders from a grill will work, as will the larger 100 pounders and up. As long as you don't draw to much from them at any one time. A little buddy heater is OK hooked to a BBQ tank, a 150,000 BTU furnace is not.

But those little one pound canisters are pretty helpless when the temperatures drop. If you bring the canisters indoors to warm up before taking them out to use in the little Mr. heater, you'll be OK. But if your storing the one pound canisters outside in the 20 below zero weather, they'll fire up for a few seconds, and then as the pressure is bled off, the heater will quit. You can get the pilot light lit, but as the catalytic burner comes on, it glows for a few seconds and then winks out.

The people that heat their houses with propane will usually have a 500 gallon or larger propane tank to ensure adequate pressure and volume to the household furnace during those cold spells.

Cold temperatures are hard on everything. Number 2 diesel at 35 below zero attains the consistency of bacon grease at room temperature. About the same color too. Kind of a cloudy milky white.  At 40 below zero, you can stand on an oil drain pan with 80/90 weight hypoid oil in it and just leave boot prints. You won't sink to the bottom.

I heat my house with electric and have a fuel oil backup furnace. I have a 275 gallon tank of fuel in the basement, because if it was outside, the fuel would never flow through the feed pipe in cold weather. Keeping it in the basement allows me to burn number 2 diesel. If the tank were outside in the cold I would have to use number one diesel fuel in order to get it to flow. Number one costs more.

I use number one diesel in the tractor for snow removal but I only go through 25 gallons or so through the winter months. When the number two diesel gets cold, the waxes precipitate out and plugs up the fuel filters. And there you sit until you swap out the filters and dump a bunch of additive into the tank to dissolve the waxes. An all around pain in the butt at 15 or 20 below and the wind blowing. Spend the few extra dollars and burn number one.

Many, many years ago. Before the advent of modern ignition systems. If conditions were just right. A super cold night and then a warm front would move in in the morning. The engines (gasoline in cars, trucks, airplanes and tractors) would draw that warmer air in on the first crank of the starter and the moisture in the air would condense on the spark plug electrode because it was colder from the night before.

Now a warm front moving in just means that the temperature has gone from a neg 40 to a neg 10. Enough of a change to cause condensation on the spark plugs, but not warm enough to make pulling and drying out spark plugs on an engine a fun time in the morning.  Luckily it was a rare occurrence that didn't happen every year.  Since then, better ignition systems, block heaters and heated garages have made this almost a thing of the past.

This is all old news for the folks in Canada and Alaska. On the other hand, we don't run into hot weather vapor lock very often either. But, better engineering and fuel formulations have pretty much eliminated that too.
6
General Discussion / Re: BRRRRR!
« Last post by crashdive123 on Yesterday at 02:10:53 PM »
Minus 22oF with a 9mph wind gives a windchill of -42oF this morning. We're supposed to warm up to a -9oF today,

Whoopee (circles finger in the air with no enthusiasm)

I should go out and start my standby generator just to see if I can get it going in these temperatures. That's what I should do, But I can see that what I should do and what I actually do are going to be two different things when it's this cold.

The plan for getting the generator running in cold like this was to heat the engine with a little Mr. Heater buddy heater for a couple hours before trying to crank the engine over. But as I think about it, I'll bet the propane wouldn't vaporize enough to run that little heater. So that leaves me with sliding a pan of hot charcoal briquettes under the gen to warm it up enough to start it.

Hmmm....A pan of red hot coals under a generator with a full 5 gallon gas tank. Just to see if it can be done. Sounds like a project for a Darwin award! Not today if I don't have to.

I believe that propane will not turn back to liquid until it reaches around -40F.  At your temps you may lose some pressure, but if your tank is full it should still work.
7
General Discussion / Re: BRRRRR!
« Last post by Pete Bog on Yesterday at 06:50:40 AM »
Minus 22oF with a 9mph wind gives a windchill of -42oF this morning. We're supposed to warm up to a -9oF today,

Whoopee (circles finger in the air with no enthusiasm)

I should go out and start my standby generator just to see if I can get it going in these temperatures. That's what I should do, But I can see that what I should do and what I actually do are going to be two different things when it's this cold.

The plan for getting the generator running in cold like this was to heat the engine with a little Mr. Heater buddy heater for a couple hours before trying to crank the engine over. But as I think about it, I'll bet the propane wouldn't vaporize enough to run that little heater. So that leaves me with sliding a pan of hot charcoal briquettes under the gen to warm it up enough to start it.

Hmmm....A pan of red hot coals under a generator with a full 5 gallon gas tank. Just to see if it can be done. Sounds like a project for a Darwin award! Not today if I don't have to.

8
General Discussion / Re: Apparently Bears Like The Beach
« Last post by windy on January 23, 2022, 09:15:35 AM »
Should have gone with the "S S S" solution.
windy
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General Discussion / Re: Apparently Bears Like The Beach
« Last post by wolfy on January 22, 2022, 11:56:27 AM »
I don't believe I'd have chosen that course of action. :lol:
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General Discussion / Re: Apparently Bears Like The Beach
« Last post by wsdstan on January 22, 2022, 08:24:51 AM »
Lucky guy certainly not afraid of bears.
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