Author Topic: Preparing for new conditions  (Read 296 times)

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Offline boomer

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Preparing for new conditions
« on: May 04, 2022, 08:28:54 AM »
Recent discussions on preparedness raised a lot of issues to consider and some good ideas.

What we have in the SW however, will likely require reconsidering some basic attitudes when planning ahead. Such as coming to terms with the fact this area is primarily desert. Higher elevations with dense forests are still subject to the demands of a desert as pics of disappearing bodies of water demonstrate.

As noted many times our water use policies are well, based on magical thinking and land use in general is basically dysfunctional. Been that way for a long time. One basic lesson for living in the arid areas is that Nature is uncompromising. Mess up too much and the desert will recycle you sooner rather than later. This has been the case for individuals and societies for as long as people have been here. I'm talking Folsom Point times onward.

Decades ago we were having discussions about integrating tried and tested design principles in building projects. Techniques useful in arid regions around the world. These days, with many folks moving to our region (understandably and aren't we all in some sense just tourists anyway?) essentially none of those design elements are in use. There are a bunch of reasons why this happens but none that seem valid.

My area is burning. Again. Air quality is bad enough that serious health warnings are a daily occurrence. Water use policy hasn't really changed except to get much worse across the board. And we still keep right on doing things we know from experience and reason cannot work.

I try to prepare as I can by stocking up and living efficiently but there is only so much that can be done when the entire region is facing ecological collapse.

I'm an old desert rat. I've run this country I love by foot, horse, motorcycle and pick up for a long time. I know the desert SW and like to think I understand it a bit. I don't know how others in different parts of the country view things but here it seems being prepped is not going to come close to enough.

Sad but true.

Offline xj35s

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Re: Preparing for new conditions
« Reply #1 on: May 04, 2022, 02:51:32 PM »
I saw the pics of lake Mead. 100 year drought? hype? I guess, bless the truck drivers, lots of water in the east....
pessimist complain about the wind. optimist expect the wind to change. realist adjusts the sails.

Offline boomer

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Re: Preparing for new conditions
« Reply #2 on: May 05, 2022, 07:29:28 AM »
The pics of Lake Mead are impressive enough but we have to extend those conditions to other reservoirs in that chain as well. It's not hype and it's not getting better even if folks here are working overtime to ignore it.

Most folks today look at our desert and think it's always looked like this. Photos from the beginning of the 20th century prove otherwise.  The have always been "dry spells", some lasting a long time. People adapted to change  and things rolled on. Not the way things are done anymore.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2022, 07:47:06 AM by boomer »

Offline Mad-max

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Re: Preparing for new conditions
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2022, 02:05:18 PM »
John Wesley Powell, the one armed badass surveyer and first to lead an expedition down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon, went back to DC and told them there just wasn't enough water in the west to sustain large populations.  Obviously,  he was ignored and now the west is dying of thirst.  Can't say we weren't warned..
huh?

Offline boomer

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Re: Preparing for new conditions
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2022, 09:31:21 AM »
Powell was right for sure. Looks like he's about to be proven right again